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Sustainable
Sunnyvale
Kelley Luyken, Nadia Makara, Pablo
Haake, Rubi Rodriguez
Triple-Bottom Line Sustainability
Social sustainability is at
the foundation of the
concept of triple-bottom
line sustaina...
“Silicon Valley’s biggest failing is not
poor marketing of its products, or
follow-through on promises, but,
rather, the d...
Plan Bay Area: Challenges
○ Climate change
○ Air quality
○ Car dependence & transit efficiency
○ Scarce housing & displace...
Rapid growth magnifies challenges
2.1M
new residents
1.1M
new jobs
128K
new residences
Our Objective
TO CREATE A SUSTAINABLE SILICON VALLEY BY CONNECTING
COMMUNITIES WITH NATURE AND THE ARTS
Let’s start with Sunnyvale
Our Vision for Sunnyvale
A Sneak Peek
Solar PV Park
WWTP
Pedestrian bridge
A Slice of Sunnyvale
Our study area spans a square mile in
northern Sunnyvale. It starts at the 101,
continues across the ...
Bay Coast
The northern edge of our study area, the
bay coast, is marked by an elevated green
space. It encloses a wastewat...
A Closer Look: Bay Coast
A barren recreational space
The Sunnyvale bay coast is a recreational
area with trails. However, ...
A Closer Look: Commercial Blocks
Commercial Blocks
Between the coastal and 237 lies a
low-density commercial zone, marked
...
A Closer Look: Commercial Blocks
Buildings & Businesses
88 commercial buildings, including offices and warehouses
6.4M squ...
Commercial superblocks
A Closer Look: Commercial Blocks
1500’ by 1100’ 1500’ by 1100’ 1500’ by 1100’
This commercial area ...
Given SLR projections of 1.4m,
75% of the commercial zone will
be inundated by 2100
A Closer Look: Commercial Blocks
This ...
A Closer Look: Highway 237
Highway 237
237 is a divisive barrier between
commercial and residential areas,
connected only ...
To cross 237, an inadequate bridge
A Closer Look: Highway 237
A single pedestrian bridge leads
across 237. It is aesthetic...
237 and connecting roads are congested
A Closer Look: Highway 237
More than 30,000 commuters enter
northern Sunnyvale each...
Residents living near 101, 237
and connecting roads experience
air and noise pollution.
A Closer Look: Highway 237
Residential Enclave
Between 237 and 101 lies a fragmented
residential area, containing single-family
homes, upscale apartm...
A Closer Look: Residential Enclave
Inadequate walkability
Residents cannot access amenities on foot
because many streets d...
A Closer Look: Residential Enclave
A variety of housing types
The residential area includes two mobile home parks for the ...
A Closer Look: Residential Enclave
Uninspiring green spaces
The John W. Christian Greenbelt lacks charisma, feels unmainta...
A Closer Look: Residential Enclave
Lack of relevant amenities
Most points of interest in the area have closed
down much li...
The residential enclave is
experiencing “advanced
gentrification.”
A Closer Look: Residential Enclave
A Closer Look: Public Transit
Public Transit
Buses from the Caltrain station run
infrequently and only stop on the
periphe...
Caltrain
Station
A Closer Look: Public Transit
This is how far residents can
travel in 30 minutes using
public transit. Th...
Our Proposal
Risk Response(s) Limitations
SLR/Flooding -De-urbanization & wetland restoration
-Resilient infrastructure (e.g. waterfron...
Interventions
● Wetland Restoration
● Waterfront Levee/Boardwalk
● Wetland Water Treatment System
● Sustainable Buildings
...
Risk Response(s) Limitations
SLR/Flooding -De-urbanization & wetland restoration
-Resilient infrastructure (e.g. waterfron...
Objectives:
1. To protect communities from flooding and
sea level rise
2. To provide nature-based recreational
opportuniti...
Deurbanization for wetlands: Our radical proposal
Our Goal: To protect communities and infrastructure from sea level rise ...
Recall: SLR & Flooding!
SLR is projected to be 1.4m by 2100, a
scenario that corresponds to projections
for wetland migrat...
Wetlands Restoration
Wetlands protect communities from sea
level rise and flooding by providing a
permeable barrier.
Coastal Levee
A levee connects the elevated green
spaces on the coast, protecting the
wastewater treatment plant.
Wetland Recreation
An extensive network of elevated trails
allows visitors and residents to access the
wetlands and connec...
Green Spaces
In addition to the wetlands, smaller parks
and plazas inside neighborhoods allow
residents to connect with na...
Connected Green Spaces
Our extensive network of green spaces,
from the wetlands in the north to the
public parks and plaza...
SW Piping: Status Quo
The current pipe network does not extend
to all relevant green spaces, and is
ill-equipped for the w...
SW Pipe Extensions
The stormwater pipe network will be
extended to reach additional green
spaces for stormwater collection.
Perforated Pipes
The piping beneath the wetlands will be
redesigned to deliver stormwater to the
wetlands for treatment an...
Outlet Ponds
When water is delivered to the wetlands,
they’ll be directed to outlet ponding areas
where they will filter t...
Detention Ponds
Other low-lying areas in the wetlands
park can act as detention ponds to
temporarily hold flood waters.
WW...
RW Piping: Status Quo
Currently, the recycled water networks do
not extend beyond the 237, nor do they
reach all of our gr...
RW Pipe Extensions
The recycled water network will be
extended to supply residential areas and
green spaces with non-potab...
Sea Level Rise in time
Energy Infrastructure
- PV park will produce energy for the
community and WWT plant
- Existing residential buildings can
o...
Guidelines for design
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
Solar
Panels
Natural Ventilation
Daylighting
Radiant
Heating & Cooling
Green Roof
High Performance Ene...
Storm Water
Recycled Water
Potable Water
Sewage
Water Systems Proposal
Aiming for Positive Water
- New buildings will capt...
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
Building Systems
Risk Response(s) Limitations
SLR/Flooding -De-urbanization & wetland restoration
-Resilient infrastructure (e.g. waterfron...
Objectives:
1. To meet the growing demand for housing
and employment spaces
2. To prevent displacement of economically
vul...
Combating displacement: Our 5-point plan
Our Goal: To prevent displacement of vulnerable communities and provide low- to m...
Preservation & Reurbanization
The residential enclave between the highways
is preserved, while dense, mixed-use urban
area...
Vibrant Urban Spaces
Between the wetlands and 237 lies a dense
urban area with mixed cultural, retail,
residential and emp...
Social Infrastructure
Green spaces, urban gardens, farmers’ markets
and arts facilities serve as social infrastructure
to ...
Risk Response(s) Limitations
SLR/Flooding -De-urbanization & wetland restoration
-Resilient infrastructure (e.g. waterfron...
Objectives:
1. To enhance access to employment,
recreational and social opportunities
2. To meet the growing demand for
tr...
Bus Rapid Transit
Two BRT lines, one limited route directly from the
Caltrain to the light rail and another community
rout...
Pedestrian Bridges
Bridges across Borregas Ave, Morse Ave,
and Bordeaux Drive increase access to
relevant amenities for re...
Accessible Amenities
Residents, employees, and visitors access
points of interest via pedestrian bridges
across 237, BRT l...
A closer look: Our intervention site
One concept, two models
Our Concept: Creating a sustainable Sunnyvale by
connecting communities with (1) nature and (2) th...
Model 1: Connecting communities with nature
By providing residents and visitors with a variety of opportunities to engage ...
Model 1: Community Garden & Farmer’s Market
The community engages in urban
gardening projects, such as open tours
and less...
Model 1: Elevated Pollinator Pathway
A pollinator pathway provides a refuge for
native plants and pollinators while giving...
Model 1: Wetlands Parks
Small wetlands parks suggest continuity
between the urban development and the
extensive wetlands t...
Model 2: Connecting communities with the arts
By providing residents and visitors with a variety of opportunities to engag...
Model 2: Arts Plazas
The community has access to arts
facilities on the plazas connected by the
pedestrian bridge. The fac...
Model 2: Elevated Arts Bridge
An elevated bridge unifies the
neighborhood by carrying the theme of
artistry from 237 up un...
Model 2: Creative Collaboration Spaces
Creative collaboration spaces provide
affordable housing and work space for
creativ...
An ambitious timeline
2017
Bring together
stakeholders for
participatory site
planning
Begin
deurbanization
process while
...
Connected Communities
A Resilient, Sustainable Sunnyvale
Solar PV Park
WWTP
Pedestrian bridge
Sustainable Sunnyvale
Sustainable Sunnyvale
Sustainable Sunnyvale
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Sustainable Sunnyvale

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CEE 235, Winter 2017, Sustainable Urban Systems, Stanford
Students: Kelley Luyken, Nadia Makara, Pablo Haake, Rubi Rodriguez

Published in: Engineering
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Sustainable Sunnyvale

  1. 1. Sustainable Sunnyvale Kelley Luyken, Nadia Makara, Pablo Haake, Rubi Rodriguez
  2. 2. Triple-Bottom Line Sustainability Social sustainability is at the foundation of the concept of triple-bottom line sustainability, but in practice, it is rarely a core consideration in new development. “Development is about transforming the lives of people, not just transforming economies.” - Joseph Stiglitz
  3. 3. “Silicon Valley’s biggest failing is not poor marketing of its products, or follow-through on promises, but, rather, the distinct lack of empathy for those whose lives are disturbed by its technological wizardry.” -Om Malik, The New Yorker
  4. 4. Plan Bay Area: Challenges ○ Climate change ○ Air quality ○ Car dependence & transit efficiency ○ Scarce housing & displacement ○ Inequity in access ○ Economic productivity Note: SLR/Flooding is absent
  5. 5. Rapid growth magnifies challenges 2.1M new residents 1.1M new jobs 128K new residences
  6. 6. Our Objective TO CREATE A SUSTAINABLE SILICON VALLEY BY CONNECTING COMMUNITIES WITH NATURE AND THE ARTS
  7. 7. Let’s start with Sunnyvale
  8. 8. Our Vision for Sunnyvale A Sneak Peek Solar PV Park WWTP Pedestrian bridge
  9. 9. A Slice of Sunnyvale Our study area spans a square mile in northern Sunnyvale. It starts at the 101, continues across the 237, and ends at the bay coast. It represents a slice of Sunnyvale’s diversity, including commercial, residential and green spaces.
  10. 10. Bay Coast The northern edge of our study area, the bay coast, is marked by an elevated green space. It encloses a wastewater treatment plant. A Closer Look: Bay Coast
  11. 11. A Closer Look: Bay Coast A barren recreational space The Sunnyvale bay coast is a recreational area with trails. However, visitors are rare because the area is uninspiring and inaccessible.
  12. 12. A Closer Look: Commercial Blocks Commercial Blocks Between the coastal and 237 lies a low-density commercial zone, marked by vast tech campuses and warehouses. It contains large employee parking areas.
  13. 13. A Closer Look: Commercial Blocks Buildings & Businesses 88 commercial buildings, including offices and warehouses 6.4M square feet of commercial space 100+ companies, mostly in tech 30K employees
  14. 14. Commercial superblocks A Closer Look: Commercial Blocks 1500’ by 1100’ 1500’ by 1100’ 1500’ by 1100’ This commercial area is composed of superblocks. That’s 4 NYC blocks, 15 Portland blocks, and St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome. As a result, the area is inaccessible to pedestrians and lacks vibrancy.
  15. 15. Given SLR projections of 1.4m, 75% of the commercial zone will be inundated by 2100 A Closer Look: Commercial Blocks This is also where wetlands are projected to migrate by 2100 if left unimpeded.
  16. 16. A Closer Look: Highway 237 Highway 237 237 is a divisive barrier between commercial and residential areas, connected only by a small bridge. It is a major source of air and noise pollution.
  17. 17. To cross 237, an inadequate bridge A Closer Look: Highway 237 A single pedestrian bridge leads across 237. It is aesthetically unappealing, narrow, and curved in a way that makes crossing take too long. Its entrance is far from any point of interest.
  18. 18. 237 and connecting roads are congested A Closer Look: Highway 237 More than 30,000 commuters enter northern Sunnyvale each day, primarily by car. The result is severe traffic congestion as well as air and noise pollution.
  19. 19. Residents living near 101, 237 and connecting roads experience air and noise pollution. A Closer Look: Highway 237
  20. 20. Residential Enclave Between 237 and 101 lies a fragmented residential area, containing single-family homes, upscale apartment complexes and mobile home parks. A Closer Look: Residential Enclave
  21. 21. A Closer Look: Residential Enclave Inadequate walkability Residents cannot access amenities on foot because many streets do not have sidewalks and residential complexes are separated by walls. As a result, one might walk 25 minutes for a distance of 100 ft.
  22. 22. A Closer Look: Residential Enclave A variety of housing types The residential area includes two mobile home parks for the elderly, multiple apartment complexes with young families, and low-density single-family homes.
  23. 23. A Closer Look: Residential Enclave Uninspiring green spaces The John W. Christian Greenbelt lacks charisma, feels unmaintained, and is surrounded by barbed wire fences.
  24. 24. A Closer Look: Residential Enclave Lack of relevant amenities Most points of interest in the area have closed down much like Desi Plaza Supermarket. Others, like Brass Rail, are inappropriate for a family-driven community.
  25. 25. The residential enclave is experiencing “advanced gentrification.” A Closer Look: Residential Enclave
  26. 26. A Closer Look: Public Transit Public Transit Buses from the Caltrain station run infrequently and only stop on the periphery of our study area. The result is a car-centric transportation environment.
  27. 27. Caltrain Station A Closer Look: Public Transit This is how far residents can travel in 30 minutes using public transit. The Caltrain station is out of reach.
  28. 28. Our Proposal
  29. 29. Risk Response(s) Limitations SLR/Flooding -De-urbanization & wetland restoration -Resilient infrastructure (e.g. waterfront levee) -Existing commercial infrastructure -Existing wastewater treatment plant Habitat/species loss -Wetland restoration -Conservation zones Lack of access to open space & recreation -Wetland restoration -Wetland boardwalk -Additional green spaces and recreational opportunities -Connections between residential areas and green spaces Water supply & sanitation -Wetland restoration -Wetland water treatment system -Rainwater capture Energy efficiency -Low cost sustainable building design -Community energy efficiency programs -Housing affordability Population growth -Additional housing units -Dense mixed-use urban development Housing affordability -Additional (affordable) housing units -Policy interventions (e.g. rent control) Segregation & fragmentation -Spatial integration -Social cohesion through community-based, culturally appropriate social infrastructure -Desire of residents to be integrated Lack of access to points of interest -Pedestrian bridge across highway -Enhanced transit reach (BRT to Caltrain station) Traffic & noise pollution -Condensed parking lots on edges of urban area -Enhanced transit reach (BRT to Caltrain station) -Highway setbacks -Space along highway Air pollution -Wetland restoration -Highway setbacks
  30. 30. Interventions ● Wetland Restoration ● Waterfront Levee/Boardwalk ● Wetland Water Treatment System ● Sustainable Buildings ● Affordable Housing ● Parking Garages for dense areas ● Accessible Green Spaces/Parks ● Community Efficiency Program ● Spatial Integration Strategies ● Community-Based Social Infrastructure ● BRT to Caltrain ● Green highway setback ● Pedestrian Bridge over the Highway Managed retreat to this line for wetland restoration, waterfront levee/boardwalk Island for recreation and arts/wildlife opportunities Spatial/social integration strategies, community-based social infrastructure, accessible green space, community efficiency program Wetlands, integrated water treatment system Dense, walkable, mixed-use district with sustainable buildings, affordable housing, parking garages Pedestrian bridge over highway, highway setback BRT line connecting Sunnyvale Caltrain station to waterfront VTA line through district
  31. 31. Risk Response(s) Limitations SLR/Flooding -De-urbanization & wetland restoration -Resilient infrastructure (e.g. waterfront levee) -Existing commercial infrastructure -Existing wastewater treatment plant Habitat/species loss -Wetland restoration -Conservation zones Lack of access to open space & recreation -Wetland restoration -Wetland boardwalk -Additional green spaces and recreational opportunities -Connections between residential areas and green spaces Water supply & sanitation -Wetland restoration -Wetland water treatment system -Rainwater capture Energy efficiency -Low cost sustainable building design -Community energy efficiency programs -Housing affordability Population growth -Additional housing units -Dense mixed-use urban development Housing affordability -Additional (affordable) housing units -Policy interventions (e.g. rent control) Segregation & fragmentation -Spatial integration -Social cohesion through community-based, culturally appropriate social infrastructure -Cohousing -Desire of residents to be integrated Lack of access to points of interest -Pedestrian bridge across highway -Enhanced transit reach (BRT to Caltrain station) Traffic & noise pollution -Condensed parking lots on edges of urban area -Enhanced transit reach (BRT to Caltrain station) -Highway setbacks -Space along highway Air pollution -Wetland restoration -Highway setbacks
  32. 32. Objectives: 1. To protect communities from flooding and sea level rise 2. To provide nature-based recreational opportunities for residents. 3. To maintain and restore habitats for sensitive species Possible Solutions: ○ Clear commercial developments to allow wetland migration ○ Introduce designated conservation zones for sensitive species ○ Create resilient infrastructure that can be used for recreation ○ Introduce setbacks between highways and residential areas Restoration & Recreation
  33. 33. Deurbanization for wetlands: Our radical proposal Our Goal: To protect communities and infrastructure from sea level rise and reimagine problematic corporate sprawl. Strategy: Create 5M sq ft of office space for 30K employees between Java Dr and 237, and include residential, retail and cultural developments. Restore wetlands above Java Dr. Challenge: Difficult to gain corporate buy-in. Value Proposition to Companies: 1. Save future costs by guarding against flood events and sea level rise. 2. Appeal to young talent with attractive urban work environments.
  34. 34. Recall: SLR & Flooding! SLR is projected to be 1.4m by 2100, a scenario that corresponds to projections for wetland migration.
  35. 35. Wetlands Restoration Wetlands protect communities from sea level rise and flooding by providing a permeable barrier.
  36. 36. Coastal Levee A levee connects the elevated green spaces on the coast, protecting the wastewater treatment plant.
  37. 37. Wetland Recreation An extensive network of elevated trails allows visitors and residents to access the wetlands and connect with nature.
  38. 38. Green Spaces In addition to the wetlands, smaller parks and plazas inside neighborhoods allow residents to connect with nature.
  39. 39. Connected Green Spaces Our extensive network of green spaces, from the wetlands in the north to the public parks and plazas in the south, will be connected via greenways.
  40. 40. SW Piping: Status Quo The current pipe network does not extend to all relevant green spaces, and is ill-equipped for the wetlands system.
  41. 41. SW Pipe Extensions The stormwater pipe network will be extended to reach additional green spaces for stormwater collection.
  42. 42. Perforated Pipes The piping beneath the wetlands will be redesigned to deliver stormwater to the wetlands for treatment and collect treated water via perforated pipes. WWTP
  43. 43. Outlet Ponds When water is delivered to the wetlands, they’ll be directed to outlet ponding areas where they will filter through and drain across the wetlands. WWTP
  44. 44. Detention Ponds Other low-lying areas in the wetlands park can act as detention ponds to temporarily hold flood waters. WWTP
  45. 45. RW Piping: Status Quo Currently, the recycled water networks do not extend beyond the 237, nor do they reach all of our green spaces. WWTP
  46. 46. RW Pipe Extensions The recycled water network will be extended to supply residential areas and green spaces with non-potable water for irrigation. WWTP
  47. 47. Sea Level Rise in time
  48. 48. Energy Infrastructure - PV park will produce energy for the community and WWT plant - Existing residential buildings can opt in to the community energy program - Low cost retrofits of existing residential buildings Legend PV Park Energy Distribution
  49. 49. Guidelines for design
  50. 50. x x x x x x x x x x Solar Panels Natural Ventilation Daylighting Radiant Heating & Cooling Green Roof High Performance Energy Design Steps for design: - Think about orientation - Be smart on envelop design (insulation and materials) - Take advantage of natural resources - Design for mechanical equipment once passive design is optimized - Offset EUI with onsite generation through PVs
  51. 51. Storm Water Recycled Water Potable Water Sewage Water Systems Proposal Aiming for Positive Water - New buildings will capture, treat and reuse water onsite and the surplus will be send to community storm water system.
  52. 52. x x x x x x x x x x Building Systems
  53. 53. Risk Response(s) Limitations SLR/Flooding -De-urbanization & wetland restoration -Resilient infrastructure (e.g. waterfront levee) -Existing commercial infrastructure -Existing wastewater treatment plant Habitat/species loss -Wetland restoration -Conservation zones Lack of access to open space & recreation -Wetland restoration -Wetland boardwalk -Additional green spaces and recreational opportunities -Connections between residential areas and green spaces Water supply & sanitation -Wetland restoration -Wetland water treatment system -Rainwater capture Energy efficiency -Low cost sustainable building design -Community energy efficiency programs -Housing affordability Population growth -Additional housing units -Dense mixed-use urban development Housing affordability -Additional (affordable) housing units -Policy interventions (e.g. rent control) Segregation & fragmentation -Spatial integration -Social cohesion through community-based, culturally appropriate social infrastructure -Cohousing -Desire of residents to be integrated Lack of access to points of interest -Pedestrian bridge across highway -Enhanced transit reach (BRT to Caltrain station) Traffic & noise pollution -Condensed parking lots on edges of urban area -Enhanced transit reach (BRT to Caltrain station) -Highway setbacks -Space along highway Air pollution -Wetland restoration -Highway setbacks
  54. 54. Objectives: 1. To meet the growing demand for housing and employment spaces 2. To prevent displacement of economically vulnerable communities 3. To promote social cohesion and integration within the local community Possible Solutions: ○ Create dense, mixed-use urban spaces ○ Establish mixed-income housing and diverse employment opportunities ○ Introduce community-based social infrastructure into existing residential areas Density & Diversity
  55. 55. Combating displacement: Our 5-point plan Our Goal: To prevent displacement of vulnerable communities and provide low- to mid-income residents with affordable housing opportunities. Challenges: Market forces; real estate lobbies. Our Action Plan: 1. Maintain and produce affordable housing (inclusionary housing policies). 2. Improve community access to and voice in the city’s planning and implementation processes. 3. Expand neighborhood stabilization policies (i.e. rent control, just cause protections). 4. Introduce community-based social infrastructure to promote social cohesion. 5. Collaborate with technology corporations for funding.
  56. 56. Preservation & Reurbanization The residential enclave between the highways is preserved, while dense, mixed-use urban areas containing relevant amenities emerge to its north and south.
  57. 57. Vibrant Urban Spaces Between the wetlands and 237 lies a dense urban area with mixed cultural, retail, residential and employment spaces. It is mirrored by a smaller mixed-use urban area directly to north of 101.
  58. 58. Social Infrastructure Green spaces, urban gardens, farmers’ markets and arts facilities serve as social infrastructure to promote social cohesion within communities. Cohesive communities are more resilient.
  59. 59. Risk Response(s) Limitations SLR/Flooding -De-urbanization & wetland restoration -Resilient infrastructure (e.g. waterfront levee) -Existing commercial infrastructure -Existing wastewater treatment plant Habitat/species loss -Wetland restoration -Conservation zones Lack of access to open space & recreation -Wetland restoration -Wetland boardwalk -Additional green spaces and recreational opportunities -Connections between residential areas and green spaces Water supply & sanitation -Wetland restoration -Wetland water treatment system -Rainwater capture Energy efficiency -Low cost sustainable building design -Community energy efficiency programs -Housing affordability Population growth -Additional housing units -Dense mixed-use urban development Housing affordability -Additional (affordable) housing units -Policy interventions (e.g. rent control) Segregation & fragmentation -Spatial integration -Social cohesion through community-based, culturally appropriate social infrastructure -Cohousing -Desire of residents to be integrated Lack of access to points of interest -Pedestrian bridge across highway -Enhanced transit reach (BRT to Caltrain station) Traffic & noise pollution -Condensed parking lots on edges of urban area -Enhanced transit reach (BRT to Caltrain station) -Highway setbacks -Space along highway Air pollution -Wetland restoration -Highway setbacks
  60. 60. Objectives: 1. To enhance access to employment, recreational and social opportunities 2. To meet the growing demand for transportation infrastructure 3. To alleviate the burden of car-based traffic on local communities Possible Solutions: ○ Expand the public transit system ○ Build pedestrian bridges across highways ○ Expand bike paths and pedestrian walkways ○ Build condensed parking structures Connectivity & Access
  61. 61. Bus Rapid Transit Two BRT lines, one limited route directly from the Caltrain to the light rail and another community route from the Caltrain through the residential area east of Borregas Ave will make commuting more efficient for workers and residents.
  62. 62. Pedestrian Bridges Bridges across Borregas Ave, Morse Ave, and Bordeaux Drive increase access to relevant amenities for residents south of the 237.
  63. 63. Accessible Amenities Residents, employees, and visitors access points of interest via pedestrian bridges across 237, BRT lines to the Caltrain and VTA station, pedestrian walkways and bike lanes.
  64. 64. A closer look: Our intervention site
  65. 65. One concept, two models Our Concept: Creating a sustainable Sunnyvale by connecting communities with (1) nature and (2) the arts. Common Features: ● Social infrastructure plazas ● Highway setbacks ● BRT line ● Highway overpass for pedestrians and bikers ● Elevated walkways ● Dense, mixed-use urban environments ● Fruit trees and vegetation ● Green roofs and solar panels
  66. 66. Model 1: Connecting communities with nature By providing residents and visitors with a variety of opportunities to engage with nature, we strengthen social cohesion and commitment to the environment.
  67. 67. Model 1: Community Garden & Farmer’s Market The community engages in urban gardening projects, such as open tours and lessons, and hosts farmers’ markets on weekends.
  68. 68. Model 1: Elevated Pollinator Pathway A pollinator pathway provides a refuge for native plants and pollinators while giving residents a taste of nature right in the middle of a vibrant urban space.
  69. 69. Model 1: Wetlands Parks Small wetlands parks suggest continuity between the urban development and the extensive wetlands to its north.
  70. 70. Model 2: Connecting communities with the arts By providing residents and visitors with a variety of opportunities to engage with the arts, we strengthen social cohesion and creativity.
  71. 71. Model 2: Arts Plazas The community has access to arts facilities on the plazas connected by the pedestrian bridge. The facilities include a community arts gallery and an outdoor performance space.
  72. 72. Model 2: Elevated Arts Bridge An elevated bridge unifies the neighborhood by carrying the theme of artistry from 237 up until the wetlands in the north.
  73. 73. Model 2: Creative Collaboration Spaces Creative collaboration spaces provide affordable housing and work space for creative projects. The building design provides shading and insulation.
  74. 74. An ambitious timeline 2017 Bring together stakeholders for participatory site planning Begin deurbanization process while rebuilding south of 237 Extend recycled water pipes BRT Service commences; Construct and connect greenways Construction of areas between Java Drive and 237 complete; Companies and small business retail begin to move in SLR reaches 1.4 meters; Sunnyvale is equitable, vibrant, and resilient Begin enforcing inclusionary housing and neighborhood stabilization policies Construct levee north of WWTP to protect from SLR and flooding; Construct pedestrian bridges across 237 Deurbanization process complete; Construction of wetlands and Java Drive boardwalk complete. All companies and small business retail have moved in; Mixed income residents occupy housing stock north of 237 2018 2019 2020 2035 2100 2019 2030 2050
  75. 75. Connected Communities A Resilient, Sustainable Sunnyvale Solar PV Park WWTP Pedestrian bridge

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