2012 ab is-your-browser-putting-you-at-risk-pt2

1,097 views

Published on

safe browser

Published in: Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,097
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
684
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

2012 ab is-your-browser-putting-you-at-risk-pt2

  1. 1.  ANALYSIS  BRIEF  –  September  2012  IS  YOUR  BROWSER  PUTTING  YOU  AT  RISK?    PART  2  –  CLICK  FRAUD    Authors  -­‐  Francisco  Artes,  Stefan  Frei,  Ken  Baylor,  Jayendra  Pathak,  Bob  Walder    Overview   1The  US  online  advertising  market  in  2011  was  approximately  $155  billion  USD .  Fraudsters  utilize  click  fraud  to  deflect  some  of  this  money  to  them  or  to  deplete  their  competitors  marketing  budgets.  In  the  process,  millions  of  consumer  and  corporate  users  are  infected  by  malware  as  a  byproduct  of  this  war  between  ad  buyers,  ad  publishers  and  fraudsters.  Click  fraud  is  a  type  of  Internet  crime  that  abuses  pay-­‐per-­‐click  online  advertising  for  the  purpose  of  generating  a  charge  per  click,  of  which  the  criminal  is  paid  a  percentage  of  the  ad  revenue.    The  effects  of  click  fraud  can  be  devastating  for  small  business  owners  and  very  costly  for  big  budget  ad  buyers.    For  individuals  and  enterprise  users,  the  effects  of  click  fraud  itself  are  malignant,  as  click  fraudsters  fund  many  malware  campaigns.  These  campaigns  lead  to  multiple  malware  infections  such  as  banking  trojans  that  typically  accompany  each  click  fraud  software  installation.    NSS  Lab  Findings:   • Click  fraud  itself,  causes  minimal  direct  harm  to  the  typical  end  user,  as  the  ultimate  target  is  the  ad   buyer.       • Consumer  and  corporate  users  are  infected  by  additional  malware  as  a  byproduct  of  click  fraud   installation.   • Click  fraud  catch  rates  are  Chrome  1.6%,  Firefox  0.8%,  Internet  Explorer  96.6%,  and  Safari  0.7%.   • Services  are  available  that  may  help  ad  buyers  identify  click  fraud.    However,  service  contracts  with  ad   2 networks  may  contain  clauses  that  restrict  ad  buyers’  ability  to  recover  damages  for  click  fraud.     • The  average  lifespan  of  a  click  fraud  URL  was  32  hours  with  over  50%  expiring  within  54  hours.                                                                                                                                          1  http://www.marketingcharts.com/direct/internet-­‐advertising-­‐revenues-­‐continue-­‐growth-­‐20257/  2  https://www.google.com/intl/en_us/adwords/select/TCUSbilling0806.html  Section  5.  
  2. 2. NSS  Labs   Analysis  Brief  –  Is  Your  Browser  Putting  You  At  Risk?  Pt  2  –  Click  Fraud    NSS  Labs  Recommendations:  Ad  buyers  should:   • Put  pressure  on  Google  to  increase  the  click  fraud  protection  capabilities  of  Chrome  and  the  SafeBrowsing   API.   • Consider  the  use  of  click  fraud  forensics  to  reduce  the  amount  of  click  fraud  damages.   • Check  and  challenge  contract  clauses  that  may  limit  damages  or  restrict  ability  to  recover  damages.   • Prepare  for  major  growth  of  click  fraud  in  2013.      Analysis  Who  is  Affected  By  Click  Fraud?  Primary  victims:  Ad  buyers.  Ad  buyers  purchase  ads  from  ad  publishers  and  are  impacted  by  click  fraud  directly,  as  they  pay  for  the  total  number  of  clicks  (valid  clicks  and  undetected  click  fraud).    Secondary  victims:  Ad  Publishers:  The  existence  of  click  fraud  has  the  potential  to  damage  both  the  reputation  of  ad  publishers  and  general  confidence  in  the  online  advertising  economy.  Most  attempt  to  identify  click  fraud  and  actively  reduce  it  via  the  use  of  fraud  detection  engines,  thus  combating  negative  perceptions.    Consumers  and  Corporate  Users:  As  ad  publishers  fraud  detection  engines  become  more  sophisticated,  fraudsters  evolve  creative  methods  of  simulating  undetectable  traffic.  One  method  is  to  infect  millions  of  unsuspecting  consumers  and  enterprise  users  with  click  fraud  malware,  which  will  convert  their  machines  into  bots.  As  these  fraudsters  have  a  strong  cash  flow,  they  finance  many  pay-­‐per-­‐install  campaigns.  Unfortunately,  other  malware  is  frequently  packaged  with  the  click  fraud  malware,  leaving  victims  open  to  intellectual  property  and  account  theft.  Beneficiaries:      Criminals:    Authors  of  click  fraud  malware  may  benefit  through  direct  sales  of  exploits  or  via  ad  revenue  from  fraudulent  clicks.  Organized  crime  syndicates  are  known  to  establish  websites  with  the  express  intent  of  perpetrating  click  fraud.  One  common  method  is  to  infect  unsuspecting  consumers  and  enterprise  users  with  a  combination  of  click  fraud  and  other  malware,  turning  their  machines  into  bot  networks  that  serve  as  launching  pads  for  other  criminal  activities.  Web  Site  Owners:    Web  site  owners  may  perpetrate  click  fraud  as  they  get  paid  a  proportion  of  ad  revenue  when  users  click  ads  that  are  displayed  on  their  site.  This  includes  organized  crime  syndicates  that  establish  websites  with  the  express  intent  of  perpetrating  click  fraud.  Business  rivals  may  purposely  use  click  fraud  to  deplete  their  competitors  marketing  budget.    Ad  Publishers:  Ad  publishers  passively  benefit  from  click  fraud,  as  they  earn  a  portion  of  revenue  every  time  one  of  their  ads  is  clicked,  fraudulently  or  not.  They  also  benefit  as  click  fraud  artificially  inflates  click  rates,  reducing  confidence  in  their  competitors  and  causing  ad  purchasers  to  defect  to  their  ad  network.  ©  2012  NSS  Labs,  Inc.  All  rights  reserved.     2      
  3. 3. NSS  Labs   Analysis  Brief  –  Is  Your  Browser  Putting  You  At  Risk?  Pt  2  –  Click  Fraud    According  to  Adometry,  an  organization  specializing  in  click  forensics  and  click  fraud  detection,  “In  an  environment  where  more  clicks  equals  more  money,  limiting  total  clicks  implicitly  means  ad  networks  reduce  revenue.”3      Test  Results  The  average  lifespan  of  a  click  fraud  URL  was  32  hours  with  over  50%  expiring  within  54  hours.    This  shows  us  that  click  fraud  is  distributed  via  quick  strike  campaigns.    Protection  technologies  must  respond  within  this  timeframe  in  order  to  be  effective.   Decay  of  Malicious  URLs  Over  Time.   100% Percent  URLs  Expired  /  ReTred   80% 57% 60% 40% 20% 0% 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 LifeTme  in  Hours     Figure  1  -­‐  Cumulative  Distribution                                                                                                                                                          3 http://www.adometry.com/blog/?p=682©  2012  NSS  Labs,  Inc.  All  rights  reserved.     3      
  4. 4. NSS  Labs   Analysis  Brief  –  Is  Your  Browser  Putting  You  At  Risk?  Pt  2  –  Click  Fraud    Figure  2  -­‐  Block  Rate  Unique  Payload  (MD5),  highlights  the  browser  block  rates  by  class  of  malware  purpose.  Internet  Explorer  exhibits  the  highest  block  rate,  followed  by  Google  Chrome,  and  then  either  Firefox  or  Safari.    However,  there  is  significant  difference  in  the  ability  of  each  browser  to  block  the  different  types  of  malware.    This  report  applies  to  click  fraud  only,  and  should  not  be  used  as  the  sole  basis  for  browser  selection.     Block Rate Unique Payload (MD5) Firefox Chrome Internet Explorer Safari ClickFraud 0.8% 1.6% 96.6% 0.7% Not ClickFraud 6.3% 25.9% 92.4% 6.6%   0.7% Safari 6.6% 96.6% Internet Explorer 92.4% 1.6% Chrome 25.9% 0.8% Firefox 6.3% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100%   Figure  2  -­‐  Block  Rate  Unique  Payload  (MD5)    While  it  is  apparent  from  these  results  that  click  fraud  is  a  leading  purpose  of  browser  malware,  it  is  surprising  and  concerning  that  there  is  such  a  large  difference  between  blocked  rates  for  other  malware  types  vs.  click  fraud  from  browser  to  browser.    As  seen  in  Figure  2,  NSS  Labs  found  Chrome  blocked  only  1.6%  of  click  fraud  as  compared  to  its  block  rate  of  other  malware  of  25.9%.    ©  2012  NSS  Labs,  Inc.  All  rights  reserved.     4      
  5. 5. NSS  Labs   Analysis  Brief  –  Is  Your  Browser  Putting  You  At  Risk?  Pt  2  –  Click  Fraud    Impact   70%   60%   Internet  Explorer   50%   Firefox   40%   30%   Chrome   20%   Safari   10%   Opera   0%   2009-­‐09   2009-­‐11   2010-­‐01   2010-­‐05   2010-­‐07   2010-­‐09   2010-­‐11   2011-­‐01   2011-­‐05   2011-­‐07   2011-­‐09   2011-­‐11   2012-­‐01   2012-­‐05   2012-­‐07   2010-­‐03   2011-­‐03   2012-­‐03   Other     Figure  3  -­‐  Market  Share  by  Browser   4Chrome’s  adoption  rate  has  established  it  as  the  leader  in  overall  browser  market  share   as  of  the  latter  half  of  2012.    Unless  Chrome  improves  its  protection  against  click  fraud,  NSS  predicts  an  increase  in  fraudulent  click  transaction  rates  given  Chrome’s  dominant  and  increasing  market  share.   35%   30%   25%   20%   Firefox     15%   Safari     10%   Chrome     5%   Internet  Explorer     0%   2009-­‐09   2009-­‐11   2010-­‐01   2010-­‐05   2010-­‐07   2010-­‐09   2010-­‐11   2011-­‐01   2011-­‐05   2011-­‐07   2011-­‐09   2011-­‐11   2012-­‐01   2012-­‐05   2012-­‐07   2010-­‐03   2011-­‐03   2012-­‐03         Figure  4  -­‐  Click  fraud  downloads  by  browser  This  graph  represents  the  overlay  of  our  test  results  when  applied  to  the  change  in  market  share  of  each  of  the  tested  browsers  since  2009.    NSS  predicts  an  increase  in  fraudulent  click  transaction  rates  given  Chrome’s  increasing  market  share.  With  the  growth  of  online  advertising  revenues,  the  profitability  of  click  fraud,  and  the  weakness  of  leading  browsers  to  protect  end-­‐users,  NSS  Labs  predicts  major  growth  in  click  fraud  in  2013.                                                                                                                                      4  http://gs.statcounter.com    ©  2012  NSS  Labs,  Inc.  All  rights  reserved.     5      
  6. 6. NSS  Labs   Analysis  Brief  –  Is  Your  Browser  Putting  You  At  Risk?  Pt  2  –  Click  Fraud        Contact  Information  NSS  Labs,  Inc.  6207  Bee  Caves  Road,  Suite  350  Austin,  TX  78746  USA  +1  (512)  961-­‐5300  info@nsslabs.com  www.nsslabs.com      This  analysis  brief  was  produced  as  part  of  NSS  Labs’  independent  testing  information  services.  Leading  products  were  tested  at  no  cost  to  the  vendor,  and  NSS  Labs  received  no  vendor  funding  to  produce  this  analysis  brief.  ©  2012  NSS  Labs,  Inc.  All  rights  reserved.  No  part  of  this  publication  may  be  reproduced,  photocopied,  stored  on  a  retrieval    system,  or  transmitted  without  the  express  written  consent  of  the  authors.      Please  note  that  access  to  or  use  of  this  report  is  conditioned  on  the  following:    1.    The  information  in  this  report  is  subject  to  change  by  NSS  Labs  without  notice.    2.    The  information  in  this  report  is  believed  by  NSS  Labs  to  be  accurate  and  reliable  at  the  time  of  publication,  but  is  not  guaranteed.  All  use  of  and  reliance  on  this  report  are  at  the  reader’s  sole  risk.  NSS  Labs  is  not  liable  or  responsible  for  any    damages,  losses,  or  expenses  arising  from  any  error  or  omission  in  this  report.  3.    NO  WARRANTIES,  EXPRESS  OR  IMPLIED  ARE  GIVEN  BY  NSS  LABS.  ALL  IMPLIED  WARRANTIES,  INCLUDING  IMPLIED  WARRANTIES  OF  MERCHANTABILITY,  FITNESS  FOR  A  PARTICULAR  PURPOSE,  AND  NON-­‐INFRINGEMENT  ARE  DISCLAIMED  AND  EXCLUDED  BY  NSS  LABS.  IN  NO  EVENT  SHALL  NSS  LABS  BE  LIABLE  FOR  ANY  CONSEQUENTIAL,  INCIDENTAL  OR  INDIRECT  DAMAGES,  OR  FOR  ANY  LOSS  OF  PROFIT,  REVENUE,  D ATA,  COMPUTER  PROGRAMS,  OR  OTHER  ASSETS,  EVEN  IF  ADVISED  OF  THE  POSSIBILITY  THEREOF.  4.    This  report  does  not  constitute  an  endorsement,  recommendation,  or  guarantee  of  any  of  the  products  (hardware  or  software)  tested  or  the  hardware  and  software  used  in  testing  the  products.  The  testing  does  not  guarantee  that  there  are  no  errors  or  defects  in  the  products  or  that  the  products  will  meet  the  reader’s  expectations,  requirements,  needs,  or  specifications,  or  that  they  will  operate  without  interruption.    5.    This  report  does  not  imply  any  endorsement,  sponsorship,  affiliation,  or  verification  by  or  with  any  organizations  mentioned  in  this  report.    6.    All  trademarks,  service  marks,  and  trade  names  used  in  this  report  are  the  trademarks,  service  marks,  and  trade  names  of  their  respective  owners.    ©  2012  NSS  Labs,  Inc.  All  rights  reserved.     6      

×