The Life Sciences Library     125 Years ago
As the library evolved, so did its name1888–1933      Experiment Station Library1933–1968      Agricultural Library1968–19...
Agricultural Librarians1888–1918      Julia Catherine Gray1918–1934      Kathryne M. Stanford1934–1938      A. Elizabeth B...
In 1888, the Agriculture  Library began as the   Experiment Station Library on the second    floor of Old Main.
Old Main Library and Julia Catherine GrayMarch 29, 1888, Julia Catherine Gray came to work as clerk and stenographer in th...
Agricultural Experiment Station Building and       Floor Plan• first agriculture building  on the PA State College  campus...
Agricultural Experiment Station InteriorAccording to Julia Gray, "The first floor of the new building provided a      size...
"North America sylva," by   François André Michaux,      published in 1853In 1902, Penn State Libraries first  endowment, ...
"Flora boreali-americana," by André Michaux, first                     published in 1803• Blight fund provided  some 10 pe...
Armsby Building and the Agricultural Library• In1905, the agricultural organizations of PA formed a movement to  secure be...
Kathryne StanfordIn 1917 Kathryne Stanford was appointedassistant librarianBecame head librarian in 1918, when JuliaGray l...
The Agriculture Library in 1924             •   10,271 volumes             •   38 domestic periodicals             •   16 ...
In 1933, the AgriculturalLibrary opened in its new   quarters in Patterson  Hall, the old creamery.Dean Watts read a paper...
Anna E. Malone, 1938-   1966 head of the  Agricultural Library• She saw the library through  some of its rapid growth  yea...
Ferguson BuildingBy 1943, the library had 32,000 volumes with reading rooms in the Forestry Building,now the Ferguson Buil...
In 1962, the School of Forestry Library was added to the Agricultural Libraryand most collections were moved to Leete Hall...
1966 to 1977 - Vladimir Micuda, head of the Agriculture Library,began the formidable task of moving the collections from L...
1968: Name changed to Agricultural and Biological SciencesLibrary       •   87,930 volumes       •   1,461 journal titles ...
In 1972, the Agricultural and Biological Sciences Library moved to secondfloor, East Pattee          • occupied 70 percent...
Keith E. Roe – 1977 to 1990     head of Life Sciences LibraryThe 1980s were characterized byautomation, especially introdu...
At the 100th anniversary in 1988, Roe delivered"History of the Agricultural Library at Penn State 1888–1988"Then library h...
The Successful Campaign for the LibraryKatherine E. Clark, 1990 - 1995 head    of the Life Sciences Library Librarians rec...
Amy L. Paster, 1995 to present, head of the Life Science LibraryIn 1996, the Life Sciences Library created its first Inter...
In 2000:Life Sciences Library moved to the 4th floor of the new Paterno Library.In 2013:    253,000 books          • more ...
Todays library focuses on          service• Friendly staff• Colorful displays• Consultation room –  Mediascape equipment w...
Models give students vital   hands-on practiceResources include• full skeletons in the  anatomical models  collection—chec...
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Life Sciences Library - 125 Years at The Pennsylvania State University

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The Life Sciences Library at Penn State is the oldest of the University Libraries. Its name and its campus location have changed over the past 125 years, but its mission has remained to serve students, faculty, and researchers who visit in person or virtually.

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Life Sciences Library - 125 Years at The Pennsylvania State University

  1. 1. The Life Sciences Library 125 Years ago
  2. 2. As the library evolved, so did its name1888–1933 Experiment Station Library1933–1968 Agricultural Library1968–1974 Agricultural and Biological Sciences Library1974 to date Life Sciences Library
  3. 3. Agricultural Librarians1888–1918 Julia Catherine Gray1918–1934 Kathryne M. Stanford1934–1938 A. Elizabeth Beal1938–1966 Anna E. Malone1966 Miriam D. Pierce1966–1977 Vladimir Micuda1977–1990 Keith E. Roe1990—1995 Katherine E. Clark1995–present Amy L. Paster
  4. 4. In 1888, the Agriculture Library began as the Experiment Station Library on the second floor of Old Main.
  5. 5. Old Main Library and Julia Catherine GrayMarch 29, 1888, Julia Catherine Gray came to work as clerk and stenographer in the newPennsylvania Agriculture Experiment Station office, one small dorm-like room in OldMain.
  6. 6. Agricultural Experiment Station Building and Floor Plan• first agriculture building on the PA State College campus• built in 1889• founded by President George Atherton• one of America’s first centers for agricultural science research
  7. 7. Agricultural Experiment Station InteriorAccording to Julia Gray, "The first floor of the new building provided a sizeable combination office and reading room, made into compartments with double-faced bookcases on extension bases.”
  8. 8. "North America sylva," by François André Michaux, published in 1853In 1902, Penn State Libraries first endowment, the George Blight Agricultural Library Fund Endowment of $5,000, was established.The Blight endowment purchased this rare book that describes theforest trees of the United States, Canada, and Nova Scotia.
  9. 9. "Flora boreali-americana," by André Michaux, first published in 1803• Blight fund provided some 10 percent of the Agricultural Library budget even as recently as the 1950s.• Fund allowed purchase of many volumes now found in the Rare Books Room.
  10. 10. Armsby Building and the Agricultural Library• In1905, the agricultural organizations of PA formed a movement to secure better facilities for Penn State.• A year or two later the main agricultural building—now Armsby— was built• By 1908, agricultural specialists joined the college• Agricultural Experiment Station reorganized into the School of Agriculture and Experiment Station
  11. 11. Kathryne StanfordIn 1917 Kathryne Stanford was appointedassistant librarianBecame head librarian in 1918, when JuliaGray left for Washington and the war effort.In 1920 the budget:• for books and binding was $459• for magazines and papers was $114
  12. 12. The Agriculture Library in 1924 • 10,271 volumes • 38 domestic periodicals • 16 foreign periodicals • 138 exchange publicationsThe School of Agriculture Library Committee • existed at least by the late 1920s • likely the first faculty library committee on campus • continued for many years to play a key role as advocate for its library
  13. 13. In 1933, the AgriculturalLibrary opened in its new quarters in Patterson Hall, the old creamery.Dean Watts read a paperby Julia Gray on the early history of the library.
  14. 14. Anna E. Malone, 1938- 1966 head of the Agricultural Library• She saw the library through some of its rapid growth years, witnessed some of its most severe space problems• She was a most outspoken proponent of the Agricultural Library and her own views
  15. 15. Ferguson BuildingBy 1943, the library had 32,000 volumes with reading rooms in the Forestry Building,now the Ferguson Building, and the Institute of Animal Nutrition in Armsby Building. By 1949 the budget for books and journals reached $7,500; by comparison in 1987,the materials budget was $450,000; and the current 2013 budget exceeds $2 million.
  16. 16. In 1962, the School of Forestry Library was added to the Agricultural Libraryand most collections were moved to Leete HallMiriam Pierce took over as acting head librarian in1966 when Malone retiredThe Agricultural Library moved to first floor PatteeLibrary, now the Reading Room for the Leisure ReadingCollection
  17. 17. 1966 to 1977 - Vladimir Micuda, head of the Agriculture Library,began the formidable task of moving the collections from Leete Hall to Pattee Library.
  18. 18. 1968: Name changed to Agricultural and Biological SciencesLibrary • 87,930 volumes • 1,461 journal titles • site dedication of East Pattee Library, July 3, 1969 • occupied one and a half floors
  19. 19. In 1972, the Agricultural and Biological Sciences Library moved to secondfloor, East Pattee • occupied 70 percent of shelf space • 105,436 volumes • 1,789 journal subscriptionsIn 1974, the name was changed to Life Sciences Library with 125,000volumes
  20. 20. Keith E. Roe – 1977 to 1990 head of Life Sciences LibraryThe 1980s were characterized byautomation, especially introduction ofLIAS (the Library Information AccessSystem), microcomputers, and an arrayof databases.CAIN online, computerizedbibliographic data base service, beganwith a research grant from the NationalAgricultural Library.
  21. 21. At the 100th anniversary in 1988, Roe delivered"History of the Agricultural Library at Penn State 1888–1988"Then library holdings included • 270,000 volumes • 3,000 current journal subscriptions received • eight full-time library faculty and staff.
  22. 22. The Successful Campaign for the LibraryKatherine E. Clark, 1990 - 1995 head of the Life Sciences Library Librarians receive microcomputers for their offices. In 1994, Joe and Sue Paterno led a"focus campaign" that with the help of generous donors, raised $13.75 million for the University Libraries.The Board of Trustees approved thename—the Paterno Library—for the new library made possible by this campaign.
  23. 23. Amy L. Paster, 1995 to present, head of the Life Science LibraryIn 1996, the Life Sciences Library created its first Internet home page.During the 1990’s, many resources became available through the World Wide Web,some with free direct access.
  24. 24. In 2000:Life Sciences Library moved to the 4th floor of the new Paterno Library.In 2013: 253,000 books • more than 12,000 zoology titles • 10,000 neuroscience titles • 9,000 plant culture titles 7,000 journal titles 5 librarians and 3 full-time staff
  25. 25. Todays library focuses on service• Friendly staff• Colorful displays• Consultation room – Mediascape equipment with a 50-inch plasma screen
  26. 26. Models give students vital hands-on practiceResources include• full skeletons in the anatomical models collection—checked out more than 800 times per year• molecular model set for general and organic chemistry

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