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Presentation at NEAISL - ePortfolios and Information Literacy Assessment

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Presentation at NEAISL - ePortfolios and Information Literacy Assessment

  1. 1. Eportfolios and Information Literacy Assessment NELINET http://moodle.nelinet.net/moodle/ Connecticut • Maine • Massachusetts • New Hampshire • Vermont • Rhode Island
  2. 2. My background Connecticut • Maine • Massachusetts • New Hampshire • Vermont • Rhode Island
  3. 3. • Web-based storage for student work in all media types. • Not limited to one course or any course. • Reflections that emphasize learning/thinking processes and build connections across learning experiences. • Rubrics to assess student learning, including self- assessment. • Ability to design multiple portfolio views for difference audiences. Connecticut • Maine • Massachusetts • New Hampshire • Vermont • Rhode Island
  4. 4. Enter Generation Y... The Millennials Freedom of choice and • Collaboration and ● expression relationships Customization and • Speed of communication ● personalization • Innovation Transparency ● Values and integrity ● Play and interactivity ● Connecticut • Maine • Massachusetts • New Hampshire • Vermont • Rhode Island
  5. 5. Eportfolios and the 8 Norms Students choose the works that best highlight their ● learning. Students choose creative and playful forms of expression ● for their ideas. Teachers provide structure and guidance through explicit ● goals and rubrics. Students share portions of their portfolio with their ● friends, parents, employers... Students self-assess along with teacher assessments. ● Connecticut • Maine • Massachusetts • New Hampshire • Vermont • Rhode Island
  6. 6. The School 2.0 – 7 Tips • Don't throw technology into the • Design educational programs classroom and hope for good according to the eight norms. things. • Reinvent yourself as a teacher, • Cut back on lecturing. professor or educator. • Empower students to collaborate. • Focus on lifelong learning, not teaching to the test. • Use technology to get to know each student. Connecticut • Maine • Massachusetts • New Hampshire • Vermont • Rhode Island
  7. 7. College Readiness • Lack of critical thinking skills • Lack of citation skills and plagiarism • Failure to use credible, authoritative information sources • Lack of depth to research and analysis • Lack of writing skills Connecticut • Maine • Massachusetts • New Hampshire • Vermont • Rhode Island
  8. 8. ACRL Standards Information Literacy Defined Information literacy is a set of abilities requiring individuals to quot;recognize when information is needed and have the ability to locate, evaluate, and use effectively the needed information.quot; Connecticut • Maine • Massachusetts • New Hampshire • Vermont • Rhode Island
  9. 9. Opportunities for Assessment • Reflections on thinking, learning that expose understanding of process and connections between learning and practice. • Assessments of progress toward defined learning goals that can be measured over time. Connecticut • Maine • Massachusetts • New Hampshire • Vermont • Rhode Island
  10. 10. Reflections Connecticut • Maine • Massachusetts • New Hampshire • Vermont • Rhode Island
  11. 11. Reflections • Standard- Historical Research, Evidence, and Point of View # 5 Students construct and test hypotheses; collect, evaluate, and employ information from multiple primary and secondary sources; and apply it in oral and written presentations. (RESEARCH) • Assignment Name- Legal Eagle Research Project: Bullying • Objective- Research “bullying” and write an essay about the subject. Figure out the causes and effects bullying has on today’s society using real life examples/ situations. Come up with solutions to the problem. • Question Prompt- How could I improve this work? Connecticut • Maine • Massachusetts • New Hampshire • Vermont • Rhode Island
  12. 12. I could have improved my bullying essay. There have been many times in my life where I have been in “bullying” situations. I could have expanded the idea of bullying and also my essay more, by using my actual situations. Although I’ve overcome most of the hard times I’ve been through, I still think about the damage that’s been done to me. There could have been many more concrete details and commentary added in my essay. A couple paragraphs would have been included to show how serious bullying is to me and also teenagers all around the world. There were quite a few examples I used but mine would have displayed a better understanding to it because it would be my problems and feedback. I could have made some of my questions that I used for my essay more interesting and it would have led me to writing a better essay. I should have found a few more websites that had actual examples of bullying, therefore I could have shown how bullying happens all around the world. Finding more websites would have improved my essay because I could have added additional information on bullying. Those were all ways I could have improved my work. Connecticut • Maine • Massachusetts • New Hampshire • Vermont • Rhode Island
  13. 13. Assessment and Rubrics University of Wisconsin - Stout Connecticut • Maine • Massachusetts • New Hampshire • Vermont • Rhode Island
  14. 14. Ideas • Does the artifact demonstrate a thorough understanding of quot;audiencequot; needs. – The information presented and source consulted are audience appropriate. – The structure/information flow of the artifact effectively communicates the desired message. – The artifact addresses answers to anticipated questions. Connecticut • Maine • Massachusetts • New Hampshire • Vermont • Rhode Island
  15. 15. Ideas • The student research conducted: – Makes appropriate use authoritative library, Web and other available information sources. – Is presented using appropriate visuals and other media that enhance understanding and persuasion when appropriate. Connecticut • Maine • Massachusetts • New Hampshire • Vermont • Rhode Island
  16. 16. Ideas • Take a moment to reflect on your use of different types of information sources in your research and the preparation of this artifact. • Discuss how different types of information contributed to the successful completion of this project. • What did you learn that will help you in future projects of this type? • What related feedback do you have for your instructor or the library that would result in a better experience? Connecticut • Maine • Massachusetts • New Hampshire • Vermont • Rhode Island
  17. 17. Ideas • Reflect on the mental processes you used to determine what information you needed for your topic and audience. • Discuss how you determined which information sources to consult in relation to those needs. • What challenges did you have? • What did you learn that will help you in future courses? • How will you relate this learning to your future career? Connecticut • Maine • Massachusetts • New Hampshire • Vermont • Rhode Island
  18. 18. Questions? Thoughts? More on Library Planning, Assessment & Information Literacy? Stay in touch Stephen Spohn spohn@nelinet.net Thank you Thanks for your time! Let us know about your successes and challenges with planning and assessment. Connecticut • Maine • Massachusetts • New Hampshire • Vermont • Rhode Island

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