Wk5 Presentation: Trust and Authority Online By Eric Shi and Yvonne Yuan

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This is MDIA5003 week 5 presentation slides by Eric and Yvonne.

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  • The presentation will start with briefly introduce reading for this week.The article ‘Shifting Roles, Enduring Values: The Credible Journalist in a Digital Age’ can be seen as two parts. It started by presenting how journalists are affected by new mass media technologies. The popularity of getting news from traditional media like print, broadcast are now decreased as the new media like internet become more and more popular. As every one today can publish their thoughts online as news without fear, it become complicated for publics to identify which content can trust (Hayes, 2007). This situation makes people hard to defining journalists. Hayes (2007) suggest that instead of seeking on define who are journalists by consider professional behavior, historical and legal perspective, focusing on the roles and values of the content itself will be more helpful to work out if we can trust the information the person proved. \n\nThe second part of this week’s reading is talking about three normative values, Authenticity, Accountability, and Autonomy, related to journalistic credibility that Hayes (2007) and his colleagues suggest need to be both strengthened and reinterpreted in a digital media environment. Information explosion and new online technologies have brought new challenges to the credibility of journalism. The authors argue that information providers in today’s media environment are overlapping considerations of honesty, transparency, and trust to establish their authenticity, accountability, as well as autonomy. Journalists are trying to use social media, such as blogs, to enhance credibility through personal disclosure and evidentiary support. \n
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  • Reporters need to be on Facebook, Twitter and other social networks. Taking simple steps such as crowdsourcing story ideas or encouraging feedback increases a reporter’s credibility with a digital audience, having a Twitter account that mixes appropriate personal messages along with work-related tweets can let the audience see the “person behind the news,” which also builds trust.\n
  • Reporters need to be on Facebook, Twitter and other social networks. Taking simple steps such as crowdsourcing story ideas or encouraging feedback increases a reporter’s credibility with a digital audience, having a Twitter account that mixes appropriate personal messages along with work-related tweets can let the audience see the “person behind the news,” which also builds trust.\n
  • Reporters need to be on Facebook, Twitter and other social networks. Taking simple steps such as crowdsourcing story ideas or encouraging feedback increases a reporter’s credibility with a digital audience, having a Twitter account that mixes appropriate personal messages along with work-related tweets can let the audience see the “person behind the news,” which also builds trust.\n
  • Reporters need to be on Facebook, Twitter and other social networks. Taking simple steps such as crowdsourcing story ideas or encouraging feedback increases a reporter’s credibility with a digital audience, having a Twitter account that mixes appropriate personal messages along with work-related tweets can let the audience see the “person behind the news,” which also builds trust.\n
  • Reporters need to be on Facebook, Twitter and other social networks. Taking simple steps such as crowdsourcing story ideas or encouraging feedback increases a reporter’s credibility with a digital audience, having a Twitter account that mixes appropriate personal messages along with work-related tweets can let the audience see the “person behind the news,” which also builds trust.\n
  • Reporters need to be on Facebook, Twitter and other social networks. Taking simple steps such as crowdsourcing story ideas or encouraging feedback increases a reporter’s credibility with a digital audience, having a Twitter account that mixes appropriate personal messages along with work-related tweets can let the audience see the “person behind the news,” which also builds trust.\n
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  • Wk5 Presentation: Trust and Authority Online By Eric Shi and Yvonne Yuan

    1. 1. Week 5: Trust Online Yvonne Yuan Eric Shi
    2. 2. Structure
    3. 3. Structure What we can learn from the reading of Week 5 How journalists are affected by new mass media technologies Three normative values, Authenticity, Accountability, and Autonomy, related to journalistic credibility
    4. 4. Structure What we can learn from the reading of Week 5 How journalists are affected by new mass media technologies Three normative values, Authenticity, Accountability, and Autonomy, related to journalistic credibility What we want to share with you What or whom do people trust more? How do journalists build trust online?
    5. 5. Summary “Shifting Roles, Enduring Values: 8 6 The Credible Journalist in a Digital Age” P How journalists are affected by new mass media technologies Three normative values, Authenticity, Accountability, and Autonomy, related to journalistic credibility
    6. 6. Summary “Shifting Roles, Enduring Values: 8 6 The Credible Journalist in a Digital Age” P How journalists are affected by new mass media technologies Three normative values, Authenticity, Accountability, and Autonomy, related to journalistic credibility
    7. 7. What we want to share with you What or whom do people trust more? How do journalists build trust online?
    8. 8. Source Criteria: Network factor:• Who is behind the source? • Who has recommended the source? Is it a friend, colleague or peer?• Is it a well-known institution or person? • Is it a link from  a well-known or unknown• Where does it originally come from? blog post to the source?• Does it indicate an author? • Does the source have many readers/ subscribers?• Is the article old or up-to-date? • Is it often cited? Can it be checked for• Does it have comments? How many example through a Twitter search or comments? Technorati rank, in case of a blog.• Has the website a commercial intention or Appearance: is the information service a common good? • Is the website professionally designed?• Is the article personally or objectively • Do you like the design? Would you trust an written? information source with an appalling design?• Does it have many or none citation to • Does it focus on content or rather other sources? advertisement?• How well written is the article? • Can you navigate easily or are there obstacles to find your information?• How open is the person behind a presented page? For example, does the author have a • Is it a rather closed site or does it link to a biography or a Twitter account? website?
    9. 9. Source Criteria: Network factor:• Who is behind the source? • Who has recommended the source? Is it a friend, colleague or peer?• Is it a well-known institution or person? • Is it a link from  a well-known or unknown• Where does it originally come from? blog post to the source?• Does it indicate an author? • Does the source have many readers/ subscribers?• Is the article old or up-to-date? • Is it often cited? Can it be checked for• Does it have comments? How many example through a Twitter search or comments? Technorati rank, in case of a blog.• Has the website a commercial intention or Appearance: is the information service a common good? • Is the website professionally designed?• Is the article personally or objectively • Do you like the design? Would you trust an written? information source with an appalling design?• Does it have many or none citation to • Does it focus on content or rather other sources? advertisement?• How well written is the article? • Can you navigate easily or are there obstacles to find your information?• How open is the person behind a presented page? For example, does the author have a • Is it a rather closed site or does it link to a biography or a Twitter account? website?
    10. 10. 7.23 China Bullet Train Crash
    11. 11. 7.23 China Bullet Train Crash
    12. 12. 7.23 China Bullet Train Crash
    13. 13. 7.23 China Bullet Train Crash How many deaths?
    14. 14. 7.23 China Bullet Train Crash 7.23 China train crash death toll raises to 40
    15. 15. 7.23 China Bullet Train Crash The accident has caused 300+ deaths
    16. 16. Osama Bin Laden’s Death ! http://boingboing.net/2011/05/01/obamastatement.html ! http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-13256676 ! http://www.helpfreetheearth.com/news314_binladen.html
    17. 17. News of Osama bin Ladens death was first leaked on Twitterby Keith Urbahn, the former chief of staff for Donald Rumsfeld. A tweet from a CBS news Producer (with fewer than 4500 Twitter followers) confirms a leak that Bin Laden is dead retweeted over 1000 times.
    18. 18. Finally, I’ve gotmy first Facebook!
    19. 19. Source Criteria: Network factor:• Who is behind the source? • Who has recommended the source? Is it a friend, colleague or peer?• Is it a well-known institution or person? • Is it a link from  a well-known or unknown• Where does it originally come from? blog post to the source?• Does it indicate an author? • Does the source have many readers/ subscribers?• Is the article old or up-to-date? • Is it often cited? Can it be checked for• Does it have comments? How many example through a Twitter search or comments? Technorati rank, in case of a blog.• Has the website a commercial intention or Appearance: is the information service a common good? • Is the website professionally designed?• Is the article personally or objectively • Do you like the design? Would you trust an written? information source with an appalling design?• Does it have many or none citation to • Does it focus on content or rather other sources? advertisement?• How well written is the article? • Can you navigate easily or are there obstacles to find your information?• How open is the person behind a presented page? For example, does the author have a • Is it a rather closed site or does it link to a biography or a Twitter account? website?
    20. 20. How does a journalist buildtrust online Using social networks to commit journalism Providing online bio pages with photos Producing reporter-focused short videos Bring audiences into the process Don’t forget to close the loop Balancing formal and informal tones carefully
    21. 21. How does a journalist buildtrust online Using social networks to commit journalism Providing online bio pages with photos Producing reporter-focused short videos Bring audiences into the process Don’t forget to close the loop Balancing formal and informal tones carefully
    22. 22. How does a journalist buildtrust online Using social networks to commit journalism Providing online bio pages with photos Producing reporter-focused short videos Bring audiences into the process Don’t forget to close the loop Balancing formal and informal tones carefully
    23. 23. Questions Do you trust online news sources from unknown authors? Why? News offered by the mainstream media like CNN and TIMES will be more reliable then those which released on blogs and twitter. (Agree or Disagree and why?) We all know that many rumours are spread among the public today. Do you share the rumours on your Facebook or Twitter? Why? And how to distinguish whether it is true or fake?

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