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  1. 1. BELL RINGER: In a complete paragraph, please explore and answer the following questions. Do you believe that texting is true conversation? Why or why not? Is text conversation different than spoken conversation? Give examples from your own life or the real world to back up your opinion. Your paragraph should: • Have more than 7 sentences • State your opinion about texting • Explain why you have this opinion • Give examples from your life or the real world
  2. 2. “THE FLIGHT FROM CONVERSATION” Together, we will read and annotate the text using SQ3R. Then, we will discuss whether we agree or disagree with Ms. Turkle’s opinion about technology. SURVEY Before you read, survey the entire text. Read titles, subtitles, introductions, and conclusions and review any graphics. QUESTION Write questions for the key points you’ve identified in your survey. Turn heading and subheadings into questions. Ask who, what, where, when, and why. READ Now read through the text from beginning to end, pausing at the end of each section to answer the questions you have created. Highlight key points in the text as you read, or make brief notes. RECITE Answer the questions out loud to reinforce your learning, or teach another person what you’ve learned. Make a list of key facts or terms you need to know. Try this step after each section in the text. REVIEW Reviewing is an ongoing process. Review the concepts in the text after you are finished reading and reciting each section, and come back to it periodically over a few days. Summarize difficult passages and rewrite the major points in your own words.
  3. 3. WITH YOUR TABLE GROUP… 1. Put a big box around the main idea sentence of the entire article. 1. Draw an arrow beside 3 places that she discusses teenagers and technology 1. Put a star beside what you believe is the most interesting sentence or idea in the article. 1. Then, answer the questions that we came up with on your SQ3R sheet.
  4. 4. “THE FLIGHT FROM CONVERSATION” DISCUSSION How has technology changed the way we communicate? Are these changes good or bad, or both? Do you agree with Ms. Turkle?
  5. 5. “THE FLIGHT FROM CONVERSATION” RECITE: A summary is not a rewrite of the original piece and does not have to be long nor should it be long. To write a summary, use your own words to express briefly the main idea and relevant details of the piece you have read. Your purpose in writing the summary is to give the basic ideas of the original reading. Your summary should be 5+ sentences long.
  6. 6. “A BOOK IS A LOADED GUN IN THE HOUSE NEXT DOOR. BURN IT. TAKE THE SHOT FROM THE WEAPON. BREACH MAN’S MIND. WHO KNOWS WHO MIGHT BE THE TARGET OF A WELL-READ MAN?” (BRADBURY 58). IN A COMPLETE PARAGRAPH (7+ SENTENCES), ANSWER THE FOLLOWING: WHAT DOES THE QUOTE MEAN? DO YOU AGREE WITH THE QUOTE? WHY OR WHY NOT? HOW COULD THIS QUOTE BE TALKING ABOUT OUR WORLD?
  7. 7. WHY WOULD SOMEONE WANT TO BURN BOOKS?
  8. 8. If there is a bedrock principle underlying the First Amendment, it is that the government may not prohibit the expression of an idea simply because society finds the idea itself offensive or disagreeable. --Supreme Court Justice William J. Brennan, Jr. How does censorship relate to our first amendment rights?
  9. 9. “If we don't believe in freedom of expression for people we despise, we don't believe in it at all.” -Noam Chomsky Books and ideas are the most effective weapons against intolerance and ignorance. -Lyndon Baines Johnson, February 11, 1964 Censorship is telling a man he can't have a steak just because a baby can't chew it. -Mark Twain
  10. 10. CENSORSHIP What comes to mind when you see the word below? What do you know about this word?
  11. 11. WHAT IS CENSORSHIP? the examining of books, films, mail, etc. to remove anything that is considered offensive, morally harmful, or politically dangerous, etc.
  12. 12. Censorship is the suppression of ideas and information that certain persons -- individuals, groups or government officials -- find objectionable or dangerous. It is no more complicated than someone saying, "Don't let anyone read this book, or buy that magazine, or view that film, because I object to it!“ Censors try to use the power of the state to impose their view of what is truthful and appropriate, or offensive and objectionable, on everyone else. Censors pressure public institutions, like libraries, to suppress and remove from public access information they judge inappropriate or dangerous, so that no one else has the chance to read or view the material and make up their own minds about it. The censor wants to prejudge materials for everyone. http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/cultureshock/whodecides/definitions.html
  13. 13. WHY ARE BOOKS BANNED? The books challenge “appropriate” beliefs, threaten people in power, promote “undesirable” ideas, etc.
  14. 14. CENSORSHIP Is censorship good or bad? Who should censor things (if anyone)? Who actually does this in the real world? Should we shelter people (or groups of people) from certain ideas or thoughts? Should books, media, or the internet be censored differently? Choose one question and write a 4 sentence response on your notes sheet.
  15. 15. 1954 Burning of Comic Books in NY because they were a ‘bad influence.’ Burning of “Harry Potter” series in New Mexico. 2003
  16. 16. BOOK BURNING Nazi Book Burning On May 10, 1933 in Berlin, Nazis and Nazi youth groups burned almost 20,000 books. Many of the authors were from ‘undesirables’- Jews, Marxists (communists), and Bolsheviks (Russian revolutionaries). “Where books are burned, in the end people will be burned.” H. Heine, 1821 VIDEO
  17. 17. BANNED BOOKS WEBQUEST Go to www.mssingersclass.com • English II • 1st 9 Weeks • Scroll down to “Banned Books Webquest”
  18. 18. IN A COMPLETE PARAGRAPH, DISCUSS HOW CENSORSHIP IS RELATED TO FEAR. HOW MIGHT KNOWLEDGE OR READING ELIMINATE FEAR? HOW COULD THEY MAKE FEAR WORSE? GIVE AT LEAST ONE EXAMPLE FROM YOUR OWN WORLD OR EXPERIENCES. YOUR PARAGRAPH SHOULD: • HAVE MORE THAN 7 SENTENCES • EXPLAIN YOUR OPINION ON CENSORSHIPS RELATIONSHIP TO FEAR • ANSWER THE QUESTIONS IN COMPLETE SENTENCES • GIVE AN EXAMPLE FROM THE REAL WORLD
  19. 19. BANNED BOOKS WEBQUEST Go to www.mssingersclass.com • English II • 1st 9 Weeks • Scroll down to “Banned Books Webquest”
  20. 20. BANNED BOOKS WEBQUEST You will be sharing about your book to 3 different people in class. Each person will have 2 minutes to explain: • The title, author, and date published • What the book is about • Why it was banned • Any other interesting things you found out Do not read from your paper! Explain your book in your own words. For each person you talk to, you must fill in a row on your notes sheet. I will be walking around to listen in on your conversations.
  21. 21. IN YOUR JOURNAL, DIVIDE A PAGE INTO TWO COLUMNS (LOOK AT EXAMPLE BELOW). IN EACH COLUMN, LIST AT LEAST 10 ATTRIBUTES OF EACH WORLD. Best Possible World Worst Possible World 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Attribute: a quality or feature regarded as a characteristic or inherent part of someone or something.
  22. 22. What would be examples of Utopia? What would be examples of Dystopia? Utopia An ideal society. The ideal republic towards which we should all strive. As such, it offers a commentary on what’s wrong with society- what should be improved or changed. Dystopia A thought experiment that isolates and exaggerates certain social trends in order to highlight their most negative qualities. In so doing, it too offers a critique of society.
  23. 23. MOVIE EXAMPLES While we watch the video clips, write down what characteristics make up the PERFECT WORLD (UTOPIA) and which ones make up the TERRIBLE WORLD (DYSTOPIA) in the films. THINK ABOUT: • What does this world look like? • What do people have or not have that is different from our world? • Is technology helping or hurting- how? Best Possible World Worst Possible World Do you recognize any of these movies?
  24. 24. MAKE A PERFECT WORLD In table groups, come up with the perfect country. Use the worksheet to organize your thoughts. All table members need to contribute to the conversation about your country and you should decide on all aspects of your country together. When you are done, show Mrs. Singer your sheet before starting your poster. Make a poster that advertises your country. Think about how you need to convince people to move there. Think about what your world will look like. Describe your perfect country on the poster.
  25. 25. UTOPIA POSTER: Your poster must: • Include at least 1 drawing of your city • Include a picture or floor map of the perfect house • Describe why your city is perfect (what has it fixed?) • Describe: • your government • your schools • your society and laws • Be persuasive in explaining why someone should move there Come join us in our perfect country where you will live…. Our cities are…. Our government is like…. In our society, people… Why you should move here:
  26. 26. GOOD MORNING! I AM SO HAPPY TO SEE YOU! Please get a sheet of paper out (or get one from the front), as well as your article from last week. You need a pen or pencil. Be ready to work when the bell rings.
  27. 27. WRITING PROMPTS: Thank you for completing your work while I was away. While reading your responses, here are some things I noticed: • Everyone did a wonderful job of explaining their opinion and backing it up with real-world examples! • Many students did not make sure that they included quotes • Many students wrote less than 11 sentences (meaning it would not have been graded at all) • Many students did not cite or use information from both sources (for example, referencing the video and the article in the same paragraph)
  28. 28. FINAL WRITING PROMPT: After reading “The Flight from Conversation” and watching Sherry Turkle’s TED Talk and the “Teens React” video, write a complete paragraph in which you make at least 3 connections between article and your own world, using evidence from at least 2 of the texts to support your opinion. This means use multiple sources This means 10+ sentences This means personal/real-world This means at least 2 direct quotes
  29. 29. GRADING:
  30. 30. FINAL WRITING PROMPT: After reading “The Flight from Conversation” and watching Sherry Turkle’s TED Talk and the “Teens React” video, write a complete paragraph in which you make at least 3 connections between article and your own world, using evidence from both texts to support your opinion. Your paragraph should: • Be at least 10 sentences (adult sentences); • Contain a main idea or topic sentence; • Make at least 3 specific connections/similarities between the main idea of the article and our own world; • Use information or points from the TED Talk or Teens React; • Use at least 2 direct quotes from the article You will have 20 minutes to complete this writing task.
  31. 31. FAHRENHEIT 451 BY RAY BRADBURY “Fahrenheit 451” was published during a time of increasing technology and fear of subversive voices in American history. Television was starting to creep into many American homes and people were becoming more disconnected. The book follows a future firefighter named Guy Montag- who starts fires, rather than puts them out. Books are illegal and the fire department burns the houses of those caught with books. The main character ends up questioning this system and starts to read books for himself- we’ll find out the rest when we read! This book was banned for: cursing and going against religion
  32. 32. RAY BRADBURY (1920- 2012) As a child, Bradbury recalls an intense fascination with monsters, magicians, and adventure films. He began writing stories at the age of 12. He wrote for Alfred Hitchcock and The Twilight Zone. Bradbury is the author of more than 500 published literary works that include short stories, plays, novels, poetry, and screenplays.
  33. 33. THE LIFE OF A WRITER In 1940, Bradbury sold his first story. In 1942, he was able to quit his newspaper job and write full-time. His first novel was The Martian Chronicles, which describes humankind’s first attempt to colonize the planet Mars. This novel combines science fiction with social commentary—an approach that characterizes much of his work.
  34. 34. SOCIAL CONCERNS Bradbury’s works explored the threat of nuclear war, censorship, racism, conformity, and the dangers of technology— issues that still concern us today.
  35. 35. WHAT DO YOU THINK? Despite its benefits, technology can have unpredictable consequences on our society. What are some of these potential consequences?
  36. 36. THE NOVEL: Fahrenheit 451 was published in 1953. It is a novel of social criticism that warns against the dangers of suppressing thought through censorship. It uses the conventions of science fiction to convey a message that “oppressive government, left unchecked, can do irreparable damage to society by limiting the creativity and freedom of its people”.
  37. 37. WHAT IS SOCIAL CRITICISM? Social criticism analyzes (problematic) social structures, and aims at practical solutions by specific measures, radical reform, or even revolutionary change. Fahrenheit 451 is a social criticism that warns against the danger of suppressing thought through the censorship of books.
  38. 38. CONTEXT OF THE NOVEL: Written in 1953: • Television becomes popular!!! • 1950: 9% of households had a TV • 1955: 64% had TV • 1960: 87% had TV • 2011: (what do you think?) • World War 11: 1939-1945 • Helicopter invented 1939 • Bombing of Hiroshima: August 6, 1945 96.7 %
  39. 39. CONTEXT OF THE NOVEL: Red Scare post WWII, threat of communism destroying American democracy, nuclear bomb threat McCarthyism getting rid of supposed communists, believed communists had infiltrated the US government and media, blacklisting, turning in your friends/neighbors for suspicious activity Video Technology television, cars, computers, medicine, prescription drugs,
  40. 40. THE RED SCARE
  41. 41. THINGS TO REMEMBER: 1. Who wrote “Fahrenheit 451”? 2. Why is it called “Fahrenheit 451”? 3. What was going on in America during the time frame it was published? 4. How was America changing during this time?
  42. 42. Better Living Electrically Future Kitchen (induction) Intro to McCarthyism The Cold War Crash Couse Future Kitchens McCarthy Era Cartoon 1950’s and 60’s Commercials
  43. 43. GET A KWL CHART FROM THE FRONT OF THE ROOM AND HAVE A SEAT. (WE WILL START INDEPENDENT READING TOMORROW, SO THAT WE HAVE MORE TIME TODAY TO FINISH POSTERS) WE WILL START WHEN THE BELL RINGS.
  44. 44. UTOPIA POSTER PRESENTATIONS: Your group will have 2 minutes to ‘sell’ us on moving to your community. Everyone in your group must speak (remember- speak loudly and clearly). Your group needs to explain: • What your community is like (where it is, what it looks like, how it is run, etc.) • What problems in society you guys have fixed and how you did it • What it would be like living there (jobs, government, things to do, what community members can expect, etc.) You will have 5 minutes to organize who will say what and (if you want) make a notecard for yourself about what you will say. I can… 0 1 2 3 3.5 4 Present information clearly, concisely, and logically (SL.10.4) The class is able to hear and understand me most of the time. I can explain my topic. The class able to hear and understand me. I can explain my topic and give some examples/detail s. I speak loud enough for the class to hear. I give examples and use detail in my explanation. I speak loudly and clearly enough for the class to hear. I make eye contact and look at the audience. I give lots of examples and details in my explanation. I speak loudly and clearly enough for the class to hear. I maintain audience engagement. I give lots of examples and details in my explanation. I can elaborate without looking at the notes or poster at all.
  45. 45. WHAT DO WE ALREADY KNOW ABOUT THE NOVEL, ITS CHARACTERS, ITS WORLD, AND HOW IT WAS WRITTEN? Write at least 5 things on your chart. We will share in 2 minutes.
  46. 46. WHAT DO WE WANT TO KNOW ABOUT THE NOVEL, ITS CHARACTERS, ITS WORLD, AND HOW IT WAS WRITTEN? Write at least 5 things on your chart. We will share in 2 minutes.
  47. 47. CLOSE READING Close reading describes, in literary criticism, the careful, sustained interpretation of a brief passage of text. Such a reading places great emphasis on the single particular over the general, paying close attention to individual words, syntax, and the order in which sentences and ideas unfold as they are read. When we closely read, we: • Annotate • Read twice (or more!) • Add notes in the margins- questions, summaries, and comments • Make inferences about the passage
  48. 48. NEW SEATS Table 1: Luis, Eric, Diamond Table 2: Lena, Tyler, Jean Table 3: Adolfo, Oscar, Luke Table 4; Gay, Ricardo Table 5: Muad, Derrick Table 6, Joseph, Avery, Baravan Table 7: Lukas, Jasmine, Iden Table 8: Sherrell , Aayush, Christian Table 9: Megan, Steven, Skyler Table 10: Trevius, Pedro, Quong
  49. 49. GET YOUR KWL CHART, EXCERPT FROM F451 AND INDEPENDENT READING BOOK FROM THE FRONT OF THE ROOM AND HAVE A SEAT. WE WILL START WHEN THE BELL RINGS.
  50. 50. INDEPENDENT READING: Expectations for Independent Reading: • No phones or headphones • No talking • No sleeping (obviously) • Reading quietly the whole time If you finish your book, or read at least 1 chapter and still don’t like it, you may go up to the library and exchange it.
  51. 51. WHAT DID WE LEARN ABOUT THE NOVEL, ITS CHARACTERS, ITS WORLD, AND HOW IT WAS WRITTEN? Write at least 5 things on your chart. We will share in 2 minutes.
  52. 52. ADD MORE! WHAT DO WE WANT TO KNOW ABOUT THE NOVEL, ITS CHARACTERS, ITS WORLD, AND HOW IT WAS WRITTEN? Write at least 3 things on your chart. We will share in 2 minutes.
  53. 53. LITERARY DEVICES Literary elements are the universal constituents of literature and thus can be found in any written or oral story. Plot and character, for example, are necessary to story and are present in stories from every culture and time period. Literary techniques, however, are not universal or necessary in the sense that not all works contain instances of them. Simile and irony are examples of literary techniques. While many poems contain similes, not all do. Simile, therefore, is a literary technique instead of a literary element.
  54. 54. LITERARY DEVICES You will work independently or with a partner to create a mini-poster for your literary device. It must contain: • Your word • The definition • At least 2 examples • An illustration • (look on your sheet for the grading rubric) Name of Device Definition Example Example
  55. 55. PRESENTATIONS Stand up. Speak clearly and loudly. You are the teacher! Be sure to tell us: • What your word is • What the definition is • At least one examples Be sure to explain things in your own words!
  56. 56. WHAT DID WE LEARN ABOUT THE NOVEL, ITS CHARACTERS, ITS WORLD, AND HOW IT WAS WRITTEN? Discuss with your table gruop. Come up with at least 3 important things! We will share in 2 minutes.
  57. 57. ADD MORE! WHAT DO WE WANT TO KNOW ABOUT THE NOVEL, ITS CHARACTERS, ITS WORLD, AND HOW IT WAS WRITTEN? Write at least 3 things on your chart. We will share in 2 minutes.
  58. 58. INDEPENDENT READING: Expectations for Independent Reading: • No phones or headphones • No talking • No sleeping (obviously) • Reading quietly the whole time If you finish your book, or read at least 1 chapter and still don’t like it, you may go up to the library and exchange it.
  59. 59. GOOD MORNING! Get your folder and a copy of “Fahrenheit 451.” There is a bell ringer on the front table. Please annotate the passage and answer the question. Today, we will: • Read closely to find figurative language and devices • Identify the reasons why the author used literary devices in F451
  60. 60. GOOD MORNING! Get your folder and a copy of “Fahrenheit 451.” There is a bell ringer on the front table. Please annotate the passage and answer the question (will be graded). Today, we will: • Read closely to find figurative language and devices • Identify the reasons why the author used literary devices in F451
  61. 61. QUIZ REVIEW! Back Please have one person at your table go to Kahoot.it on their phone. Your name will be “Table ___ 5B” or “Table ___ 6B”
  62. 62. QUIZ! Please look at the grading rubric as you complete your quiz. You will have 20 minutes to complete the quiz. Headphones may be in, but phones must be out and flipped over.
  63. 63. “FAHRENHEIT 451” Open your book to page 10. We will read together for 15 minutes. Then, we will complete a comprehension organizer for what we have read so far.
  64. 64. QUIZ REVIEW! Back Please have one person at your table go to Kahoot.it on their phone. Your name will be “Table ___ 5B” or “Table ___ 6B”
  65. 65. GOOD MORNING! YOU NEED YOUR FOLDER AND A BELL RINGER (ON THE FRONT TABLE). PLEASE BE WORKING ON THE BELL RINGER WHEN THE BELL RINGS! Today, we will: • Read closely to find figurative language and literary devices • Identify the reasons why Bradbury uses specific literary devices Agenda: • Bell Ringer & Discussion • Review literary devices • Read F451 • Analyze literary devices in F451
  66. 66. Without turning on the light he imagined how this room would look. His wife stretched on the bed, uncovered and cold, like a body displayed on the lid of a tomb, her eyes fixed to the ceiling by invisible threads of steel, immovable. And in her ears the little Seashells, the thimble radios tamped tight, and an electronic ocean of sound, of music and talk and music and talk coming in, coming on the shore of her unsleeping mind. The room was indeed empty. Every night the waves came in and bore her off on their great tides of sound, floating her, wide- eyed toward morning. There had been no night in the last two years that Mildred has not swum that sea, had not gladly gone down in it for the third time.
  67. 67. QUIZ REVIEW! Back Please have one person at your table go to Kahoot.it on their phone. Your name will be “Table ___ 5B” or “Table ___ 6B”
  68. 68. TIME TO READ! Get a copy of F451 from the box on your table. Open your book to page 10. We will read together. Then, we will complete a literary device organizer. When we are reading, we should: • Be following along in the book • Be quiet • Ask questions when we have them • Contribute to conversation and questions
  69. 69. LITERARY DEVICES Cite Evidence Explain Argue its Significance “He strode in a swarm of fireflies” p. 1 (metaphor) Guy is burning a house with books in it. He is standing outside. He is enjoying the fire. The sparks from the fire are going near him and he compares them to fireflies.
  70. 70. LITERARY DEVICES Cite Evidence Explain Argue its Significance “He strode in a swarm of fireflies” p. 1 (metaphor) Guy is burning a house with books in it. He is standing outside. He is enjoying the fire. The sparks from the fire are going near him and he compares them to fireflies. This shows us that Guy finds the fire beautiful and harmless, like a firefly. It shows us that he isn’t threatened or worried about what he does at his job, but enjoys watching the homes burn. In your table group, you will find at least 2 examples of the following and complete the chart: • Metaphor • Simile • Personification
  71. 71. GOOD MORNING! YOU NEED YOUR FOLDER AND A BELL RINGER (ON THE FRONT TABLE). PLEASE BE WORKING ON THE BELL RINGER WHEN THE BELL RINGS! Today, we will: • Read closely to find figurative language and literary devices • Identify the reasons why Bradbury uses specific literary devices Agenda: • Bell Ringer & Discussion • Review literary devices • Read F451 • Analyze literary devices in F451
  72. 72. He got up and put back the drapes and opened the window wide to let the night air in. It was two o'clock in the morning. Was it only an hour ago, Clarisse McClellan in the street, and him coming in, and the dark room and his foot kicking the little crystal bottle? Only an hour, but the world had melted down and sprung up in a new and colorless form. Laughter blew across the moon-colored lawn from the house of Clarisse and her father and mother and the uncle who smiled so quietly and so earnestly. Above all, their laughter was relaxed and hearty and not forced in any way, coming from the house that was so brightly bit this late at night while all the other houses were kept to themselves in darkness. Montag heard the voices talking, talking, talking, giving, talking, weaving, reweaving their hypnotic web.
  73. 73. QUIZ REVIEW! Back Final Kahoot time! Your name will be “Table ___ 5B” or “Table ___ 6B”
  74. 74. TIME TO READ! Get a copy of F451 from the box on your table. Open your book to page 10. We will read together. Then, we will complete a literary device organizer. When we are reading, we should: • Be following along in the book • Be quiet • Ask questions when we have them • Contribute to conversation and questions
  75. 75. LITERARY DEVICES Cite Evidence Explain Argue its Significance “He strode in a swarm of fireflies” p. 1 (metaphor) Guy is burning a house with books in it. He is standing outside. He is enjoying the fire. The sparks from the fire are going near him and he compares them to fireflies. This shows us that Guy finds the fire beautiful and harmless, like a firefly. It shows us that he isn’t threatened or worried about what he does at his job, but enjoys watching the homes burn. In your table group, add at least 2 examples of the following and complete the chart for each: • Metaphor • Simile • Personification (Make sure they are correct- we will be writing about them on Monday!)
  76. 76. GOOD MORNING! YOU NEED YOUR FOLDER AND YOUR INDEPENDENT READING BOOK. IN YOUR FOLDER, BEGIN WORKING ON THE SUMMARY SHEET FOR THE READING WE HAVE COMPLETED SO FAR (THROUGH PAGE 21). USE A BOOK TO HELP YOU COMPLETE THE SHEET. Today, we will: • Read closely to find figurative language and literary devices • Identify the reasons why Bradbury uses specific literary devices Agenda: • Bell Ringer & Discussion • Independent Reading • Read F451 • Close read for literary devices in F451
  77. 77. INDEPENDENT READING: Expectations for Independent Reading: • No phones or headphones • No talking • No sleeping (obviously) • Reading quietly the whole time If you finish your book, or read at least 1 chapter and still don’t like it, you may go up to the library and exchange it.
  78. 78. TIME TO READ! Get a copy of F451 from the box on your table. Open your book to page 10. We will read together. Then, we will complete a literary device organizer. When we are reading, we should: • Be following along in the book • Be quiet • Ask questions when we have them • Contribute to conversation and questions
  79. 79. LITERARY DEVICES Cite Evidence Explain Argue its Significance “He strode in a swarm of fireflies” p. 1 (metaphor) Guy is burning a house with books in it. He is standing outside. He is enjoying the fire. The sparks from the fire are going near him and he compares them to fireflies. This shows us that Guy finds the fire beautiful and harmless, like a firefly. It shows us that he isn’t threatened or worried about what he does at his job, but enjoys watching the homes burn. In your table group, add at least 2 examples of the following and complete the chart for each: • Metaphor • Simile • Personification (Make sure they are correct- we will be writing about them on Monday!)
  80. 80. GOOD MORNING! YOU NEED YOUR FOLDER AND A BELL RINGER (ON THE FRONT TABLE). PLEASE BE WORKING ON THE BELL RINGER WHEN THE BELL RINGS! Today, we will: • Read closely to find figurative language and literary devices • Identify and track symbols within F451 Agenda: • Quiz • Symbolism • Read F451
  81. 81. What Symbols Stand For • A symbol is often an ordinary object, event, person, or animal to which we have attached extraordinary meaning and significance.
  82. 82. EASIER DEFINITION? A symbol is a concrete, real object that makes people think of an abstract, non-concrete idea.
  83. 83. FIRE! (& OTHER SYMBOLS) Your table will follow one symbol throughout the book Take 5 minutes for each person at your table to find an example of your symbol in what we have read so far. (Everyone must add one) Write the page number on your sheet. When you are done, go back and look for FIRE imagery in what we have read.
  84. 84. TIME TO READ! Get a copy of F451 from the box on your table. Open your book to page 10. We will read together. Then, we will complete a literary device organizer. When we are reading, we should: • Be following along in the book • Be quiet • Ask questions when we have them • Contribute to conversation and questions
  85. 85. GOOD MORNING! PLEASE GET YOUR INDEPENDENT READING BOOK. WE WILL BEGIN OUR QUIZ RIGHT AFTER THE BELL. NOW WOULD BE A GOOD TIME TO REVIEW AND STUDY. (FLASHCARDS ARE ON MSSINGERSCLASS.COM) Today, we will: • Read closely to find symbols within a text • Identify the meaning of various symbols in F451 Agenda: • Quiz • Ind. Reading • Symbolism • Read F451
  86. 86. QUIZ! THIS IS A RETAKE OF OUR QUIZ LAST WEEK. IT WILL REPLACE ANY GRADES THAT YOU HAD FOR THE PREVIOUS QUIZ. YOU NEED TO RETAKE ANY SKILLS THAT YOU SCORED LESS THAN 85 ON. After you have completed your quiz, silently read your Independent Reading book. Agenda: • Bell Ringer & Discussion • Review symbolism • Read F451 • Analyze literary devices in F451
  87. 87. GOOD MORNING! PLEASE GET YOUR FOLDER AND A BELL RINGER FROM THE FRONT TABLE. START WORKING ON YOUR BELL RINGER BEFORE THE BELL RINGS! Today, we will: • Read closely to find symbols within a text • Identify the meaning of various symbols in F451 Agenda: • Bell Ringer • Symbolism • Read F451 • Track symbols
  88. 88. “Books bombarded his shoulders, his arms, his upturned face. A book lit, almost obediently, like a white pigeon, in his hands, wings fluttering. In the dim, wavering light, a page hung open and it was like a snowy feather, the words delicately painted thereon. In all the rush and fervor, Montag had only an instant to read a line, but it blazed in his mind for the next minute as if stamped there with fiery steel. ‘Time has fallen asleep in the afternoon sunshine.’ He dropped the book. Immediately, another fell into his arms…. Montag’s hand closed like a mouth, crushed the book with wild devotion, with an insanity of mindlessness to his chest. The men above were hurling shovelfuls of magazines into the dusty air. They fell like slaughtered birds and the woman stood below, like a small girl, among the bodies.
  89. 89. Guided Notes on Symbolism Layers of Meaning
  90. 90. What Symbols Stand For • A symbol is often an ordinary object, event, person, or animal to which we have attached extraordinary meaning and significance.
  91. 91. EASIER DEFINITION? A symbol is a concrete, real object that makes people think of an abstract, non-concrete idea.
  92. 92. Why Create Symbols? You may ask why writers don’t just come right out and say what they mean. • Symbols allow writers to suggest layers and layers of meaning-possibilities that a simple, literal statement could never convey. • A symbol is like a pebble cast into a pond: It sends out ever widening ripples of meaning
  93. 93. We use a rectangle of dyed cloth to symbolize pride and identity for a country.
  94. 94. • We use a picture of a skull and crossbones to symbolize poison or danger. • We send red roses as a symbol of love.
  95. 95. Where Do Symbols Come From? ● Symbols can be inherited or invented-- symbols can be different within different cultures ● The most familiar symbols have been inherited, meaning, they have been handed down over time
  96. 96. WHERE DO SYMBOLS COME FROM? • For example: no one really knows who first thought of using a lion as a symbol of power, courage and domination • Once these qualities were associated with the animal, images of lions appeared on flags, banners, coats of arms and castle walls • The lion became a public symbol that shows up in art and literature, even today! • Can you think of some examples of how lions are used as a symbol of courage and power?
  97. 97. • People throughout history have endowed ordinary objects with feelings and ideas far beyond their simple meaning A crown symbolizes royalty An olive branch symbolizes peace or victory Five linked rings symbolize the Olympics and unity
  98. 98. • Symbols can also be invented. • What is the symbol for our school? “Bobcats are excellent hunters, stalking prey with stealth and patience, then capturing their meals with one great leap.”
  99. 99. SYMBOLS IN LITERATURE Some invented symbols in literature have become so widely known that they often have gained the status of public symbols. For example, Peter Pan is a symbol for eternal childhood
  100. 100. Why Create Symbols? You may ask why writers don’t just come right out and say what they mean. • Symbols allow writers to suggest layers and layers of meaning-possibilities that a simple, literal statement could never convey. • A symbol is like a pebble cast into a pond: It sends out ever widening ripples of meaning
  101. 101. Simon kicked open the door to the small shop. He looked around in the darkness until he found what he was looking for. Against the far wall, there stood a worn wooden bench with crowbars, pliers, screwdrivers and other implements. Silently, he used the tools to remove the shackles around his wrists and feet, shackles he had worn for years, shackles that had helped to keep him imprisoned for most of his life. Finally free, he left the shackles on the table and began to leave. Before he reached the door, Simon turned around and stared at the shackles on the table. He strode across the room and picked up a heavy hammer. With all his might, he brought the hammer down again and again on the shackles, until they broke and bent. Still he hammered, until the cruel chains and manacles were disfigured, unrecognizable lumps of iron. His face marked by both fatigue and satisfaction, Simon dropped the hammer and left.
  102. 102. • You may not be able to articulate fully what a certain symbol means, but you will always find that the symbol, if it is powerful and well chosen, will speak forcefully to your emotions and to your imagination. • You may also find that you will remember and think about the symbol long after you have forgotten other parts.
  103. 103. EXAMPLES What could the following concrete objects represent as abstract ideas or feelings?
  104. 104. INDEPENDENT PRACTICE Complete the remainder of your guided notes to prepare for a class discussion.
  105. 105. GOOD MORNING! PLEASE GET YOUR FOLDER AND INDEPENDENT READING BOOK FROM THE FRONT TABLE. Today, we will: • Read closely to find symbols within a text • Identify the meaning of various symbols in F451 Agenda: • Ind. Reading • Symbolism • Read F451 • Track symbols
  106. 106. INDEPENDENT READING: Expectations for Independent Reading: • No phones or headphones • No talking • No sleeping (obviously) • Reading quietly the whole time If you finish your book, or read at least 1 chapter and still don’t like it, you may go up to the library and exchange it.
  107. 107. FIRE! (& OTHER SYMBOLS) Your table will follow one symbol throughout the book Take 5 minutes for each person at your table to find an example of your symbol in what we have read so far. (Everyone must add one) Write the page number on your sheet. When you are done, go back and look for FIRE imagery in what we have read.
  108. 108. TIME TO READ! Get a copy of F451 from the box on your table. Open your book to page 10. We will read together. Then, we will complete a literary device organizer. When we are reading, we should: • Be following along in the book • Be quiet • Ask questions when we have them • Contribute to conversation and questions
  109. 109. GOOD MORNING! PLEASE GET A BELL RINGER FROM THE FRONT TABLE. BEGIN BEFORE THE BELL RINGS. Today, we will: • Read closely to find symbols within a text • Identify the meaning of various symbols in F451 Agenda: • Bell Ringer • Read F451 • Symbolism
  110. 110. TIME TO READ! Get a copy of F451 from the box on your table. Open your book to page 49. We will read together. Then, we will complete a response writing prompt to the section. When we are reading, we should: • Be following along in the book • Be quiet • Ask questions when we have them • Contribute to conversation and questions
  111. 111. The hearth is a symbol of the home. The fire in the hearth was a positive, warming, life-giving force. It was a place to relax, discuss, read or share time with loved ones and family. SYMBOL
  112. 112. ESSAY: The Hearth symbolizes the home and all that goes with it- family, connection, safety, etc. After reading “The Hearth and the Salamander,” explain the symbolism of Hearth in the novel using the guiding questions below to explain your response in a detailed, 10+ sentence paragraph that uses at least 2 quotes from the text to support your opinions. Make sure that you have a main idea sentence that you support throughout your writing. • Instead of a fireplace, what do characters have as a ‘Hearth’ in their homes- how might this change how they connect to one another? • In what ways does Montag have a home? • In what ways does he not? • Who believes or does have a home in the novel? • How has Bradbury made the idea of ‘Home’ different from our own- or does he? • What does the Hearth now symbolize? You might want to start your paragraph with: in “The Hearth and the Salamander,” Bradbury has used the symbolism of a Hearth to… Grades: 1. Use of evidence (2+ relevant quotes that support you) 2. Well written 10+ sentence paragraph with a main idea and supporting ideas. 3. Explores the symbolism and meaning of the Hearth
  113. 113. GOOD MORNING! PLEASE GET YOUR INDEPENDENT READING BOOK & FOLDER. Today, we will: • Read closely to find symbols within a text • Identify the meaning of various symbols in F451 Agenda: • Ind. Reading • Finish “Hearth & the Salamander” • Symbol analysis • Intro to poster project, if time
  114. 114. INDEPENDENT READING: Expectations for Independent Reading: • No phones or headphones • No talking • No sleeping (obviously) • Reading quietly the whole time If you finish your book, or read at least 1 chapter and still don’t like it, you may go up to the library and exchange it.
  115. 115. TIME TO READ! Get a copy of F451 from the box on your table. Open your book to page 61. We will read together. Then, we will complete a response writing prompt to the section. When we are reading, we should: • Be following along in the book • Be quiet • Ask questions when we have them • Contribute to conversation and questions
  116. 116. GOOD MORNING! PLEASE GET A BELL RINGER FROM THE FRONT TABLE. BEGIN YOUR BELL RINGER BEFORE THE BELL! Today, we will: • Read closely to find symbols within a text • Identify the meaning of various symbols in F451 Agenda: • Bell Ringer • Quiz • Finish symbolism mini-essay • Read F451 • Poster Project
  117. 117. AFTER YOUR QUIZ When you are done with your quiz, get a book and continue working on your essay. They are due today!
  118. 118. GOOD MORNING! PLEASE GET YOUR INDEPENDENT READING BOOK Today, we will: • Read closely to find symbols within a text • Identify the meaning of various symbols in F451 Agenda: • Ind. Reading • Next Week! • Read “F451” • Close Reading Poster Project
  119. 119. INDEPENDENT READING: Expectations for Independent Reading: • No phones or headphones • No talking • No sleeping (obviously) • Reading quietly the whole time If you finish your book, or read at least 1 chapter and still don’t like it, you may go up to the library and exchange it.
  120. 120. CLOSE READING POSTER • In groups, you will create a close reading poster for a passage from “The Hearth and the Salamander” that you will present to the class. • Each student will be responsible for a piece of this project and will work together to create the poster. • You will present your section to the class on Friday. Tasks: Everyone will work on annotations 1. Summary 2. Figurative Language 3. Symbolism 4. Characterization
  121. 121. YOUR POSTER: All students contribute to the annotations. Summary: at least 7 sentences Characterization: at least 7 sentences and one quote Figurative Language: at least 5 devices, with explanation of what they reveal or tell us Symbolism: at least 7 sentences and one quote Each section must have an image, drawing, or picture. Write legibly and clearly. Design your poster so it looks organized and is creative.
  122. 122. YOUR POSTER On an index card, decide who will do each part and turn it in. Page your quote is on: _______ Summary: ______________________ Characterization: ______________________ Figurative Language: ______________________ Symbolism: ______________________
  123. 123. GOOD MORNING! PLEASE GET A COPY OF F451 FROM THE BOX ON YOUR TABLE. Today, we will: • Read closely to find symbols within a text • Identify the meaning of various symbols in F451 Agenda: • Read “F451” • Close Reading Poster Project
  124. 124. GOOD MORNING! PLEASE GET A COPY OF F451 FROM THE BOX ON YOUR TABLE. Today, we will: • Read closely to find symbols within a text • Identify the meaning of various symbols in F451 Agenda: • Read “F451” • Close Reading Poster Project • Present Posters
  125. 125. YOUR POSTER: All students contribute to the annotations. Summary: at least 7 sentences Characterization: at least 7 sentences and one quote Figurative Language: at least 5 devices, with explanation of what they reveal or tell us Symbolism: at least 7 sentences and one quote Each section must have an image, drawing, or picture. Write legibly and clearly. Design your poster so it looks organized and is creative.
  126. 126. GRADING I Can… 1 2 3 3.5 4 Read close to identify essential elements of a passage I do not have a completed assignment. My analysis shows basic understanding of my passage. I attempt to use quotes and/or explain deeper ideas. My analysis shows understanding of the passages, attempts to make inferences, and is well organized and written. Quotes are effectively used. My analysis shows depth of understanding, makes inferences about the passage, and is well organized and written. Quotes are effectively used and explained in my analysis. My analysis shows depth of understanding, makes inferences about the passage, and is well organized and written. Quotes are effectively used and well explained in my analysis. Speak loudly and clearly without reading from my notes I do not share my information or may only say a few sentences. I look at my poster often, but do not read the whole part of it. I mostly speak clearly and loudly. My audience is able to understand my main points. I present my analysis and only check with my poster a few times to make sure that I am explaining what I wrote. I do not read from the poster. I speak clearly and loudly and explain my part in an organized way. I present my analysis without reading from the poster. I speak clearly and loudly and explain my part in a way that makes sense to the audience. I present my analysis without reading from the poster. I speak clearly and loudly and explain my part in a way that makes sense to the audience, including inferences about bigger concepts and ideas.
  127. 127. GOOD MORNING! PLEASE GET A BELL RINGER FROM THE FRONT TABLE. BEGIN BEFORE THE BELL RINGS! Today, we will: • Read closely to find symbols within a text • Identify the meaning of various symbols in F451 Agenda: • Bell Ringer • Read “F451” • John Green Video • Socrative Responses
  128. 128. CLOSE READING PASSAGE
  129. 129. TIME TO READ! Get a copy of F451 from the box on your table. Open your book to page 81. We will read together. Then, we will complete a response writing prompt to the section. When we are reading, we should: • Be following along in the book • Be quiet • Ask questions when we have them • Contribute to conversation and questions
  130. 130. JOHN GREEN ON F451… We will watch the short video together and then answer questions on our phones/laptops.
  131. 131. Go to Socrative.com (use your phone or a laptop) Room Number: 13331 Begin the questions and responses once you are logged in!

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