Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Author Rights: Securing Future Uses of Your Work

579 views

Published on

Presentation for University of Wisconsin - Parkside Copyright Day Event.

When you or your faculty and students publish, you typically sign a copyright transfer agreement or a license agreement with the publisher. Signing this agreement without understanding it may mean that you lose control over further reproduction or distribution of your work. This session will review how to think about future uses of your work and approaches to negotiation to retain the rights that you need to make use of your work.

Published in: Education, Business, Technology
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Author Rights: Securing Future Uses of Your Work

  1. 1. Author's Rights: Securing Future Uses of Your Work Sarah L. Shreeves University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Copyright Day – UW Parkside April 16 2014 Research by Dayna Batemen https://www.flickr.com/photos/suttonhoo22/305806118/ (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)
  2. 2. IANAL
  3. 3. Goals: • Think through possible future use of your work • Understand limitations imposed by contracts (copyright transfer agreements) • Understand how to approach negotiating to retain rights you want
  4. 4. In order to publish your work, publishers need from you the right to publish your work. Usually publishers ask you to transfer your copyright to them. The work belongs to you until Springer Bookshelf in Foyle’s Bookstore by Mark Hillary https://www.flickr.com/photos/markhillary/734889139/ (CC BY-2.0)
  5. 5. Why do we care? (we being libraries)
  6. 6. new knowledge promotion tenure reputation profit supporting organization access to knowledge access to knowledge preservation curriculum research needs
  7. 7. wholesale transfer of rights creates scarcity/monopoly drives prices up (inelastic market) Copyright
  8. 8. Why do we care? (we being creators)
  9. 9. What do you want to do with your work? ‐ Share with colleagues or practitioners ‐ Make it available to public (or be required to under an institutional or funder policy) ‐ Use parts of it yourself, in future work (including a dissertation) ‐ Prepare a textbook or other collected volume of your work ‐ Others? Veere Tools by Ard Hessellink https://www.flickr.com/photos/markhillary/734889139/ (CC BY-NC 2.0)
  10. 10. So…what rights does a copyright holder have? • Reproduction • Distribution • Derivatives • Performance • Public display The right to license any of the above to third parties Absolutely necessary for publishing Arguably necessary for publishing (at least a subset of derivative rights) Mostly come into play for creative works
  11. 11. Some considerations in academic works • Joint authorship • Power dynamics in joint authorship • Who owns the work?
  12. 12. University of Wisconsin System http://www.uwsa.edu/fadmin/gapp/gapp27.htm#endnote1 It is the policy of the UW System that copyrightable instructional materials developed under the conditions identified in sections II.B.1. and 2. of this policy paper belong solely to the author. (There are some exceptions.)
  13. 13. In order to publish your work, publishers need from you the right to publish your work. Usually publishers ask you to transfer your copyright to them. The work belongs to you until Springer Bookshelf in Foyle’s Bookstore by Mark Hillary https://www.flickr.com/photos/markhillary/734889139/ (CC BY-2.0)
  14. 14. Do these agreements allow you: • To reuse portions of your work in future work • To make available the publishers pdf online • To give others the right to reprint the work in a larger collected volume
  15. 15. What rights remain to the author? 3. Copyright Transfer. In consideration of the action of the American Medical Association (AMA) in reviewing and editing this submission (manuscript, tables, and figures), I hereby transfer, assign, or otherwise convey all copyright ownership, including any and all rights incidental thereto, exclusively to the AMA, in the event that such work is published by the AMA.
  16. 16. How to Negotiate Mind the Gap by Pawel Loj https://www.flickr.com/photos/limaoscarjuliet/3305886294/ (CC BY 2.0)
  17. 17. It doesn’t have to be all or nothing! – Understand what you want! – Read the contract carefully. – Contact the publisher about changes you want. – Amend the contract.
  18. 18. If the publisher still says no… • Consider publishing your work elsewhere where you can retain the rights you want. • Publish your work as planned with the original publisher. The decision is entirely up to you.
  19. 19. “If…then” – the secrets of reuse  By the author • If full rights retained, then limitless (within confines of law, that is) • If some rights retained, then within limits of negotiated rights • If no rights retained, then fair use only  By others • If published open access, then freely accessible – think about the scoped of an implied license • If published under a Creative Commons license, then within limits defined by the license • If published traditionally, then fair use only
  20. 20. It’s your work. Understand what you want to do with your work. Read your agreements with publishers. Retain the rights you need. Research by Dayna Batemen https://www.flickr.com/photos/suttonhoo22/305806118/ (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
  21. 21. Contact Info / Attribution Sarah Shreeves IDEALS Coordinator Scholarly Commons Co-Coordinator University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign sshreeve@illinois.edu 217-244-3877 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- - Slide 1 and 20: Research by Dayna Batemen https://www.flickr.com/photos/suttonhoo22/305806118/ (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0) Slide 4 and 13: Springer Bookshelf in Foyle’s Bookstore by Mark Hillary https:// www.flickr.com/photos/markhillary/734889139/ (CC BY-2.0) Slide 16: Veere Tools by Ard Hessellink https://www.flickr.com/photos/markhillary/734889139/ (CC BY-NC 2.0) Slide 16: Mind the Gap by Pawel Loj https://www.flickr.com/photos/limaoscarjuliet/3305886294/ (CC BY 2.0) Portions of the slides above originate from the Association of College and Research Libraries “Scholarly Communication: From Understanding to Engagement” Roadshow series. http://www.ala.org/acrl/issues/scholcomm/roadshow. Authors include Kevin Smith, Sarah Shreeves, Molly Keener, Stephanie Davis-Kahl, and Joy Kirchner and are used under a CC BY License. All have been edited by Sarah Shreeves on April 15, 2014. This presentation is made available under a CC-BY-SA-NC license. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/. If you use the images in this presentation, please provide appropriate attribution and respect the
  22. 22. Questions? Comments?

×