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Street Sweeping

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Green Fleet Education Session - Storm Water Pollution Prevention 8.10.16

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Street Sweeping

  1. 1. The County Surveyor's Office maintains official county maps and perpetually maintains original government survey section corners, the basis for all property boundaries. In cooperation with the County Drainage Board, this office manages County's 600 mile legal drain (stormwater drainage) system, and also reviews subdivision proposals in unincorporated areas of the county for proper compliance with County ordinances. The County Surveyor coordinates the development of Lake County's computerized mapping, the Geographic Information System (GIS), along with other record and mapping responsibilities. Surveyor Departments within the Lake County Surveyor’s Office:  Surveying Department  Drainage Department  MS4 Stormwater Quality  GIS MS4 Good Housekeeping Implementation Includes: Street Sweeping Bill Emerson, Jr. Lake County Surveyor
  2. 2. Know the Rules that Govern Good Housekeeping: Part 1 Typical Compliance MeasuresMS4 Requirements Written documentation of maintenance activities Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) 327 IAC 15-13-17(b)(1) Written documentation of maintenance activities, maintenance schedules, and long term inspection procedures for BMPs to reduce floatables and other pollutants discharged from the separate storm sewers. Maintenance activities shall include, as appropriate, the following: (A) Periodic litter pick up as defined in the MS4 area SWQMP. (B) Periodic BMP structure cleaning as defined in the MS4 area SWQMP. (C) Periodic pavement sweeping as defined in the MS4 area SWQMP. (D) Roadside shoulder and ditch stabilization. (E) Planting and proper care of roadside vegetation. (F) Remediation of outfall scouring conditions.
  3. 3. Sample SOP for “Street Sweeping” Know the Rules that Govern Good Housekeeping: Part 1
  4. 4. Sample SOP for “Street Sweeping” Know the Rules that Govern Good Housekeeping: Part 1
  5. 5. Sample SOP for “Street Sweeping” Know the Rules that Govern Good Housekeeping: Part 1
  6. 6. Sample SOP for “Street Sweeping” Know the Rules that Govern Good Housekeeping: Part 1
  7. 7. Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) City of Lafayette Case study: • Example SOP  Street Sweeping Before MS4 Street Sweeping SOP SOP for Daily Sweeper Operation In order to keep streets clean, we run 4 sweepers on a daily basis, Monday thru Friday weather permitting. The City of Lafayette is broken up into 5 sweeper routes, 1 representing each day of the week. Each day of the week is divided into 4 zones (1 for each sweeper). Each sweeper will go into their assigned route and zone according to what day of the week it is. They will work in this zone the entire day. If they complete their zone before the day is over, they will contact other sweeper drivers and assist them with their zones for the rest of that day only. However if they are not able to complete their route on that given day, they will return on the same day the following week and continue where they left off the previous week, and so on until that zone is completed, at which time the process repeats itself. Empty Sweepers when full.
  8. 8. Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) City of Lafayette Case study: • Example SOP  Street Sweeping New & Improved with MS4 connection
  9. 9. • Example SOP  Street Sweeping New & Improved with MS4 connection Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) City of Lafayette Case study:
  10. 10. What type of SOP? How many? MS4’s typically have several SOPs to ‘maintain’ and ‘inspect’ their stormwater infrastructure:  Periodic litter pick up  Periodic BMP structure cleaning  Periodic pavement sweeping  Roadside shoulder and ditch stabilization  Planting/care of roadside vegetation  Remediation of outfall scouring conditions Know the Rules that Govern Good Housekeeping: Part 1
  11. 11. Typical Compliance MeasuresMS4 Requirements Written documentation of maintenance activities Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) 327 IAC 15-13-17(b)(1) Written documentation of maintenance activities, maintenance schedules, and long term inspection procedures for BMPs to reduce floatables and other pollutants discharged from the separate storm sewers. Maintenance activities shall include, as appropriate, the following: (A) Periodic litter pick up as defined in the MS4 area SWQMP. (B) Periodic BMP structure cleaning as defined in the MS4 area SWQMP. (C) Periodic pavement sweeping as defined in the MS4 area SWQMP. (D) Roadside shoulder and ditch stabilization. (E) Planting and proper care of roadside vegetation. (F) Remediation of outfall scouring conditions. Know the Rules that Govern Good Housekeeping: Part 1
  12. 12. Typical Compliance MeasuresMS4 Requirements Controls for reducing or eliminating the discharge of pollutants from operational areas Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plans (SWPPPs) for Municipal Facilities and Maintenance Yards 327 IAC 15-13-17(b)(2) Controls for reducing or eliminating the discharge of pollutants from operational areas, including roads, parking lots, maintenance and storage yards, and waste transfer stations. Know the Rules that Govern Good Housekeeping: Part 2
  13. 13. Sample Municipal/County Facility SWPPP Components Municipal Facility & Maintenance Yard SWPPPs Typically Specify Pavement Sweeping as a Best Management Practice to Reduce the Discharge of Pollution from Operational Areas Know the Rules that Govern Good Housekeeping: Part 2
  14. 14. Typical Compliance MeasuresMS4 Requirements Written documentation of maintenance activities Controls for reducing or eliminating the discharge of pollutants from operational areas Develop measurable goals; reduction percentages and timetables must be identified Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plans (SWPPPs) Stormwater Quality Management Plan Part C - Program Implementation Know the Rules that Govern Good Housekeeping: Part 3
  15. 15. Sample Stormwater Quality Management Plan Commitments MS4 Entity Chooses/Identifies Local BMPs
  16. 16. MS4 Entity Chooses/Identifies Local BMPs MS4 Entity Chooses/Identifies Local Measurable Goals Sample Stormwater Quality Management Plan Commitments
  17. 17. MS4 Entity Chooses/Identifies Local BMPs MS4 Entity Chooses/Identifies Local Measurable Goals MS4 Entity Chooses/Identifies Local Timeline Sample Stormwater Quality Management Plan Commitments
  18. 18. MS4 Entity Chooses/Identifies Local BMPs MS4 Entity Chooses/Identifies Local Measurable Goals MS4 Entity Chooses/Identifies Local Timeline Sample Stormwater Quality Management Plan Commitments
  19. 19. Typical Compliance MeasuresMS4 Requirements Written documentation of maintenance activities Controls for reducing or eliminating the discharge of pollutants from operational areas Develop measurable goals; reduction percentages and timetables must be identified Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plans (SWPPPs) The MS4 ‘Feedback Loop’ Street Sweeping Commitments from your Stormwater Quality Management Plan (Part C)
  20. 20. “Local government operations conduct numerous activities that may pose a threat to water quality if practices and procedures are not in place to prevent pollutants from entering the stormwater conveyance. These activities include winter road maintenance, minor road repairs and other infrastructure work, automobile fleet maintenance, landscaping and park maintenance, and building maintenance.” Know Your Pollution Risk Factors
  21. 21. TYPICAL PROGRAM TYPICAL ACTIVITIES THAT OCCUR THROUGHOUT AN MS4 AREA POTENTIAL POLLUTANTS (RISK FACTORS) SEDIMENT NUTRIENTS TRASH METALS BACTERIA OIL&GREASE ORGANICS PESTICIDES Street/Highway Operation & Maintenance Sweeping & Cleaning X X X X Street Repair & Maintenance X X X X X Bridge & Structure Maintenance X X X X X Drainage System Operation & Maintenance Cleaning of Conveyance Structures X X X X X Controlling Illicit Discharges X X X X X X X X Maintenance of Inlet/Outlet Structures X X X X Waste Handling & Disposal Solid Waste Collection X X X X X X Waste Reduction & Recycling X X Household Hazardous Waste Collection X X X X X Controlling Litter X X X X Controlling Illegal Dumping X X X X X Data source: California Stormwater BMP Handbook Potential Pollutants Associated with Municipal/County ACTIVITIES Know Your Pollution Risk Factors: Activities
  22. 22. TYPICAL PROGRAM TYPICAL ACTIVITIES THAT OCCUR THROUGHOUT AN MS4 AREA POTENTIAL POLLUTANTS (RISK FACTORS) SEDIMENT NUTRIENTS TRASH METALS BACTERIA OIL&GREASE ORGANICS PESTICIDES Street/Highway Operation & Maintenance Sweeping & Cleaning X X X X Street Repair & Maintenance X X X X X Bridge & Structure Maintenance X X X X X Drainage System Operation & Maintenance Cleaning of Conveyance Structures X X X X X Controlling Illicit Discharges X X X X X X X X Maintenance of Inlet/Outlet Structures X X X X Waste Handling & Disposal Solid Waste Collection X X X X X X Waste Reduction & Recycling X X Household Hazardous Waste Collection X X X X X Controlling Litter X X X X Controlling Illegal Dumping X X X X X Data source: California Stormwater BMP Handbook Potential Pollutants Associated with Municipal/County ACTIVITIES Mitigate Risk Factors with:  Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs)  Stormwater Quality Management Plan Commitments Know Your Pollution Risk Factors: Activities
  23. 23. TYPICAL ACTIVITIES THAT OCCUR AT MUNICIPAL/COUNTY FACILITIES POTENTIAL POLLUTANTS (RISK FACTORS) SEDIMENT NUTRIENTS TRASH METALS BACTERIA OIL&GREASE ORGANICS PESTICIDES Building & Grounds Maintenance & Repair X X X X X X X X Waste Handling & Disposal X X X X X X X X Vehicle & Equipment Fueling X X X X Vehicle & Equipment Maintenance & Repair X X X Vehicle & Equipment Washing X X X X X X Outdoor Loading & Unloading of Materials X X X X X X X Outdoor Container Storage of Liquids X X X X X Outdoor Container Storage of Raw Materials X X X X X X Data source: California Stormwater BMP Handbook Potential Pollutants Associated with Municipal/County FACILITIES Know Your Pollution Risk Factors: Facilities
  24. 24. TYPICAL ACTIVITIES THAT OCCUR AT MUNICIPAL/COUNTY FACILITIES POTENTIAL POLLUTANTS (RISK FACTORS) SEDIMENT NUTRIENTS TRASH METALS BACTERIA OIL&GREASE ORGANICS PESTICIDES Building & Grounds Maintenance & Repair X X X X X X X X Waste Handling & Disposal X X X X X X X X Vehicle & Equipment Fueling X X X X Vehicle & Equipment Maintenance & Repair X X X Vehicle & Equipment Washing X X X X X X Outdoor Loading & Unloading of Materials X X X X X X X Outdoor Container Storage of Liquids X X X X X Outdoor Container Storage of Raw Materials X X X X X X Data source: California Stormwater BMP Handbook Potential Pollutants Associated with Municipal/County FACILITIES Mitigate Risk Factors with:  Facility SWPPPs  Facility Good Housekeeping Inspections  Stormwater Quality Management Plan Commitments Know Your Pollution Risk Factors: Facilities
  25. 25. Annual Report Data Requirements Rule 13 Programmatic Indicators 24 to 34 Updated data for each of these indicators must be submitted in each Annual Report: 24 Number and location of MS4 entity facilities that have containment for accidental releases of stored polluting materials 25 Estimated or actual acreage or square footage, amount, and location where pesticides and fertilizers are applied by a regulated MS4 entity to places where stormwater can be exposed within the MS4 area 26 Estimated or actual linear feet or percentage and location of unvegetated swales and ditches that have an appropriate sized vegetated filter strip 27 Estimated or actual linear feet or percentage and location of MS4 conveyances cleaned or repaired 28 Estimated or actual linear feet or percentage and location of roadside shoulders and ditches stabilized, if applicable 29 Number and location of stormwater outfall areas remediated from scouring conditions, if applicable 30 Number and location of deicing salt and sand storage areas covered or otherwise improved to minimize stormwater exposure 31 Estimated or actual amount, in tons, of salt and sand used for snow and ice control 32 Estimated or actual amount of material by weight collected from catch basin, trash rack, or other structural BMP cleaning 33 Estimated or actual amount of material by weight collected from street sweeping, if utilized 34 If applicable, number or percentage and location of canine parks sited at least one hundred fifty (150) feet away from a surface waterbody Reliable Documentation
  26. 26. Compiling Annual Report Data Reliable Documentation
  27. 27. Compiling Annual Report Data Reliable Documentation
  28. 28. MS4 Coor. Fire Dept. Police Dept. Parks Dept. Public Works Street Dept. Storm Water Dept.  Training Sessions  Routine Inspections  Annual Report Data Consistent Repetitions can Foster Local Relationships Reliable Documentation
  29. 29. Purpose & Intended Use of Document This document is guidance for developing or enhancing a Pollution Prevention and Good Housekeeping Program to comply with Indiana’s Rule 13 which meets the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES), Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System (MS4), and Clean Water Act permitting requirements. It represents the collective work product of the Indiana Association for Floodplain and Stormwater Management’s (INAFSM) Stormwater Committee’s P2&GH Group. This group has 16 members representing many different Phase II MS4s entities throughout the state of Indiana. Sample Guidance Document Prepared by: Indiana Association of Floodplain & Stormwater Management Use Available Guidance Documents
  30. 30. Use Available Guidance Documents
  31. 31. Easy-to-Use Guide: 1. Provides reference to Rule 13 language
  32. 32. Easy-to-Use Guide: 1. Provides reference to Rule 13 language 2. Identifies multiple options for implementation
  33. 33. Easy-to-Use Guide: 1. Provides reference to Rule 13 language 2. Identifies multiple options for implementation 3. Identifies relevant Programmatic Indicators
  34. 34. Easy-to-Use Guide: 1. Provides reference to Rule 13 language 2. Identifies multiple options for implementation 3. Identifies relevant Programmatic Indicators 4. Options for Measurable Goals and tracking
  35. 35. Easy-to-Use Guide: 1. Provides reference to Rule 13 language 2. Identifies multiple options for implementation 3. Identifies relevant Programmatic Indicators 4. Options for Measurable Goals and tracking 5. Describes disposal procedures
  36. 36. Easy-to-Use Guide: 1. Provides reference to Rule 13 language 2. Identifies multiple options for implementation 3. Identifies relevant Programmatic Indicators 4. Options for Measurable Goals and tracking 6. Describes documentation needs 5. Describes disposal procedures
  37. 37. Easy-to-Use Guide: 1. Provides reference to Rule 13 language 2. Identifies multiple options for implementation 3. Identifies relevant Programmatic Indicators 4. Options for Measurable Goals and tracking 6. Describes documentation needs 7. Possible “next steps” for above & beyond efforts 5. Describes disposal procedures
  38. 38. Easy-to-Use Guide: 1. Provides reference to Rule 13 language 2. Identifies multiple options for implementation 3. Identifies relevant Programmatic Indicators 4. Options for Measurable Goals and tracking 6. Describes documentation needs 8. Technical Resources 7. Possible “next steps” for above & beyond efforts 5. Describes disposal procedures
  39. 39. Easy-to-Use Guide: 1. Provides reference to Rule 13 language Regulation: 327 IAC 15-13-17 (b) (1) (C) Written documentation of maintenance activities, maintenance schedules, and long term inspection procedures for BMPs to reduce floatables and other pollutants discharged from the separate storm sewers. Maintenance activities shall include, as appropriate, the following:  Periodic pavement sweeping as defined in the MS4 area SWQMP.
  40. 40. Easy-to-Use Guide: 2. Identifies multiple options for implementation Implementation Best Management Practices (BMPs)  Create and maintain written documentation or procedures describing the activity. This could be SOPs, SWPPPs, P2&GHMs, or other applicable format.  Include a frequency or schedule for street sweeping in the procedure.  Perform routine maintenance on street sweeping vehicles to prevent spills and leaks.  Implement employee training on street sweeping operations (refer to Section 2.0 for more information on training requirements).
  41. 41. Easy-to-Use Guide: 3. Identifies relevant Programmatic Indicators Programmatic Indicator for Street Sweeping Estimate of actual amount of material by weight collected from street sweeping.
  42. 42. Easy-to-Use Guide: 4. Options for Measurable Goals and tracking Possible Measurable Goals  Decrease pollutants to the storm sewer system by sweeping streets and municipally-owned paved areas.  Sweep all streets a specified number of times per year (local MS4 to decide frequency of sweeping as identified in the SWQMP Part C NPDES Permit document).  Track the amount of streets swept.
  43. 43. Easy-to-Use Guide: 5. Describes disposal procedures Disposal Describe in the procedure the disposal process and temporary storage method for street sweeping material. Materials must be:  Stored for less than six months at the municipality before disposal at a permitted landfill unless the MS4 can prove long- term storage is not intended.  Stored in 1) a covered container; or 2) on an impervious surface, covered and the runoff/run-on contained.  Stored in an area where the material will not wash into a waterway or wetland.  Refer to Section 9.2.2 for disposal measures.
  44. 44. Easy-to-Use Guide: 6. Describes documentation needs Documentation Record the amounts of debris collected on tracking logs, work orders or other means; or if the material is segregated from other debris, maintain disposal invoices with tonnage.
  45. 45. Easy-to-Use Guide: 7. Possible “next steps” for above & beyond efforts Advanced BMPs (Optional)  Designate a wash out area for the street sweeping vehicle where wash water is discharged to a sanitary sewer.  Implement a screening and reuse program for street sweeping materials.  Schedule street sweeping activities during spring snowmelt to reduce deicing pollutants to the storm sewer.  Prioritize sweeping for areas based on high-traffic areas, curb/no curb areas, observations, complaints, and proximity to waterways.  Store sweeping materials in a drying bed at the wastewater plant before disposal so runoff/run-on flows to the sanitary sewer.  Store sweeping materials under roof to prevent contact with precipitation.
  46. 46. Easy-to-Use Guide: 8. Technical Resources Additional Resources USEPA Stormwater BMPs – Parking Lot and Street Cleaning
  47. 47. Easy-to-Use Guide: 1. Provides reference to Rule 13 language 2. Identifies multiple options for implementation 3. Identifies relevant Programmatic Indicators 4. Options for Measurable Goals and tracking 6. Describes documentation needs 8. Technical Resources 7. Possible “next steps” for above & beyond efforts 5. Describes disposal procedures
  48. 48. Easy-to-Use Guide: 1. Provides reference to Rule 13 language 2. Identifies multiple options for implementation 3. Identifies relevant Programmatic Indicators 4. Options for Measurable Goals and tracking 6. Describes documentation needs 8. Technical Resources 7. Possible “next steps” for above & beyond efforts 5. Describes disposal procedures Overall, this “easy-to-use” guide has 26 Implementation Templates covering the following topic areas:  Training: 7 templates  Infrastructure: 5 templates  Flood Management: 2 templates  Facility Maintenance: 5 templates  Vehicle Maintenance/Fueling: 3 templates  Public Street O&M: 5 templates  Pesticides & Fertilizer: 2 templates  Spill Prevention: 3 templates
  49. 49. REFERENCE GUIDE: CENTER FOR WATERSHED PROTECTION
  50. 50. REFERENCE GUIDE: IDEM FACT SHEET
  51. 51. The County Surveyor's Office maintains official county maps and perpetually maintains original government survey section corners, the basis for all property boundaries. In cooperation with the County Drainage Board, this office manages County's 600 mile legal drain (stormwater drainage) system, and also reviews subdivision proposals in unincorporated areas of the county for proper compliance with County ordinances. The County Surveyor coordinates the development of Lake County's computerized mapping, the Geographic Information System (GIS), along with other record and mapping responsibilities. Surveyor Departments within the Lake County Surveyor’s Office:  Surveying Department  Drainage Department  MS4 Stormwater Quality  GIS MS4 Good Housekeeping Implementation Includes: Street Sweeping Bill Emerson, Jr. Lake County Surveyor

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