Fractures

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Fractures

  1. 1. fractures Types <br />By Stefana Sas<br />
  2. 2. Simple fracture <br />A bone fracture is a medical condition in which there is a break in the continuity of the bone;<br />A bone fracture can be the result of high force impact or stress, or trivial injury as a result of certain medical conditions that weaken the bones, such as osteoporosis, bone cancer etc.; <br />
  3. 3. Simple fracture <br />
  4. 4. Simple fracture<br />
  5. 5. Transverse fracture <br />Afracture that occurs at right angles to the longitudinal axis of the bone involved.<br />Often transverse fracture results from a direct blow (imagine a karate chop directly across the arm), but it can also sometimes occur when people do things repetitively, like running. When the fracture occurs, the bone may or may not line up completely. The action of the injury can cause the bone to separate, so that part of it is misaligned and needs to be reductedor re-placed together.<br />
  6. 6. Transverse fracture<br />
  7. 7. Greenstick fracture <br />Greenstick, buckle or torus fracture is a fracture in a young, soft bone in which the bone bends and partially breaks.<br />Greenstick fractures usually occur most often during infancy and childhood when one’s bones are soft. <br />There are three basic forms of greenstick fracture.<br />In the first a transverse fracture occurs in the cortex, extends into the middleportionof the bone and becomes oriented along the longitudinal axis of the bone without disrupting the opposite cortex.<br />The second form is a torus or buckling fracture, caused by impaction.<br />The third is a bow fracture in which the bone becomes curved along its longitudinal axis.<br />
  8. 8. Greenstick fracture <br />
  9. 9. Work cited<br />www.medterms.com<br />www.wikipedia.org<br />

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