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Workshop on CBCS to Faculty GDC (W) Begumpet Hyderabad

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Workshop on CBCS to Faculty GDC (W) Begumpet Hyderabad

  1. 1. WORKSHOP ON “Effective implementation of Choice Based Credit System- Advantages and Challenges”
  2. 2. Essential Considerations for Curriculum Development:  Issue/problem/need is identified (issue  what),  Characteristics and needs of learners (target audience  who),  Changes intended for learners (intended outcomes/objectives  what the learners will be able to do),  Important and relevant content (what),  Methods to accomplish intended outcomes (how),  Evaluation strategies for methods, content, and intended outcomes (What works?).
  3. 3. Key Questions to be answered before developing a curriculum:  How are the institutional vision / mission reflected in the academic programmes of the College?  How the process is initiated? (Need Assessment, Feedback, etc)  How are the following aspects ensured through curriculum design and development? ◦ Employability ◦ Innovation ◦ Research
  4. 4. Key Questions to be answered before developing a curriculum:  How does College ensure that the curriculum developed addresses the needs of the society and have relevance to the regional / national developmental needs?  Whether the Curriculum is encouraging active adoption of innovative approaches of curricula design that are aimed at equipping learners with the necessary skills to access and manage knowledge rather than just assimilate knowledge.  The curriculum should integrate academic excellence, humanistic education and entrepreneurial education.
  5. 5. Key Questions to be answered before developing a curriculum:  Undergraduate curricula may require learners to undergo two types of attachment/internship: community attachment, to provide the students with an opportunity to learn as they serve; and industrial internship to provide the students with the opportunity to learn as they work.  All graduate curricula should require learners to undertake research and write a dissertation or thesis as part of the study programme.
  6. 6. Key Questions to be answered before developing a curriculum:  Before a programme is designed the needs of the learners and society should be ascertained  In the development of curricula should specify clearly the aims as well as the learning outcomes of the programme.  Curricula should be learner-centered and describe content, skills to be mastered, teaching methods and learning activities, forms of assessment, course texts and other teaching materials. Reviewing processes should be part of a curriculum plan in order to accommodate new ideas and knowledge.
  7. 7. What is Choice Based Credit System?  Giving due credit to the various components of a learning system;  Student-centred approach to learning is emphasized;  Opportunities for students to pursue an integrated programme with courses of their choice;  Academics attribute or assign certain number of credits to each subject depending on their level of learning and placement in a curriculum.
  8. 8.  This is not to undermine any subject as ‘easy’ or ‘hard’ to understand but it’s relative level to be imparted at that point of study of the student for a subject, is given due consideration.  Flexibility of choice of subjects by the student in a given duration.  Flexibility allows a student to choose from a pool(s) of subject(s) which he/she wishes to specialize in, besides acquiring exposure to other related and even not-so-related subjects of his/her choice. What is Choice Based Credit System ?
  9. 9. Why Choice Based Credit System? The main objective of the CBCS  To provide broad based education;  To provide students with greater flexibility in choice of courses;  To provide students multidisciplinary curriculum;  To enable students to choose courses at basic/advanced level;  To enable students to acquire job oriented skills;  To enable students to progress at their own pace and  To enable highly motivated students gain extra credits.
  10. 10. ◦It will be too ambitious at this juncture to emulate the real CBCS which enables students to progress at their own pace and enable highly motivated students to gain extra credits. ◦POSSIBLITIES..?
  11. 11. WHAT IS A CREDIT?  The term ‘Credit’ describes the quantum of syllabi for various programmes in terms of hours of study.  It indicates differential weightage given according to the content and duration of the course in the curriculum design.  Any given degree programme should have a minimum number of credit requirement, e.g., a Bachelor’s Degree could have approximately 150 – 200 credits.  Institutions should afford students an opportunity to earn extra credits.
  12. 12. Courses Each course designed may comprise lectures/ tutorials/ laboratory work/ seminar/ project work/on the job training, etc, to meet effective teaching and learning needs and credits are assigned suitably.
  13. 13. Attributing Credits The central point of the credit system lies in attributing credit to the subjects of learning. In general, credits are assigned based on two core issues. One for the number of hours of instructions (class contact hours) given to the student and two, for other components of the subjects, such as library work, seminars, assignments, etc.
  14. 14. Thus, the term ‘credit’ describes the quantum of syllabi for various programmes in terms of hours of study. It indicates differential weightage given according to the content and duration of the course in the curriculum design. Generally one hour per week has one credit. However, there could be some flexibility because of the practicals, field visits, and tutorials comprising a course.
  15. 15. Credits  The credits cannot be greater than the hours.  Credits for certain programmes like extension activities, Computer Literacy and NCC/NSS/Sports/Extra Curricular activities, etc., are not considered for computation of class/grade at the end of the Degree Course. It is only to recognize students’ involvement in these. The credits in these, in no way, match the hours spent.
  16. 16. ALC CREDIT SYSTEM AT UNDERGRADUATE LEVEL
  17. 17. General Objectives 1. To develop language skills in students both in English and in a Second Language of his/her choice; 2. To develop the personality of the students to be able to realize his/her full potential; 3. To open the students to the social realities with a view to making him/her a responsible citizen and other-centred;
  18. 18. 4. To develop an in-depth knowledge in a selected area of his/her study; 5. To train a student in a specific skill, to equip him/her for the job market; 6. To broaden the outlook of the student through interdisciplinary approach, to be able to access knowledge and use the same meaningfully. General Objectives
  19. 19. B.SC/BA/B COM Courses Part I: I language English Part II: II language – Telugu / Hindi / Sanskrit / Any other language Part III: Foundation Courses – Indian Heritage & Culture, Science & Civilization, Environmental Education, Fundamentals in IT, Value Education. Part IV: ALERT Part V: NCC/NSS/Sports & Games/Extra Curricular Activities
  20. 20. Courses Part VI: Project Work Part VII: I General Elective II General Elective Part VIII: I Major II Major III Major  Subject Elective (Special) in each of the major in V Semester  Subject Elective (Skill-based) in each of the major in VI Semester
  21. 21. Foundation courses  The foundation courses aim at ◦ giving the students an appreciation of our Heritage, Culture and Religions; ◦ to develop in the students a sense of scientific temperament and logical and analytical reasoning; ◦ re-orient them towards values in life; ◦ their societal commitment and other related areas like Personality Development, ◦ Communication Skills, etc. ◦ ALERT and NCC / NSS / Sports & Games/ Extra curricular activities are to be given specific weightage.
  22. 22.  In the three Majors, the students will be introduced to understand and master his area of subjects that are related to his/her area of specialisation. MAJORS (CORE COURSES)
  23. 23.  In Semester V in each of the Major there will be a Subject elective (special) that focuses on an area of higher learning in that particular subject  In Semester VI each of Major could have a Subject elective (skill-based) that focuses on acquiring a particular skill in that major.  In Semester VI each student should do a Project Work in one major.
  24. 24.  Apart from the three majors, a student is required to do two General Electives. in Semesters III and IV, which will be of multidisciplinary nature. These General Electives are career and market oriented, skill enhancing add-on courses that have utility for job and self-employment of students.
  25. 25. Subject Semester I Semester II Semester III Semester IV Semester V Semester VI English 04 (2) 04 (2) 04 (2) 04 (2) Language 04 (2) 04 (2) 04 (2) 04 (2) Foundation Course Indian Heritage & Culture 1 1 (1) - - Science & Civilization - - 1 1 (1) Environmental Education 1 1 1 1 (1) Fundamentals in IT (FIT) 1+2 1+2 (1) - - Value Education 1 1 1 1 (1) ALERT (2) NCC/NSS/SPORTS/EXTRA CURRICULAR (1) Major 1 4+3 (4+2) 4+3 (4+2) 4+3 (4+2) 4+3 (4+2) 4+3 (4+2) 4+3 (4+2) Major 2 4+3 (4+2) 4+3 (4+2) 4+3 (4+2) 4+3 (4+2) 4+3 (4+2) 4+3 (4+2) Major 3 4+3 (4+2) 4+3 (4+2) 4+3 (4+2) 4+3 (4+2) 4+3 (4+2) 4+3 (4+2) Subject Elective (Special) Major 1 2+3 (2+2) Subject Elective (Special) Major 2 2+3 (2+2) Subject Elective (Special) Major 3 2+3 (2+2) Subject Elective (Skill based) Major 1 2+3 (2+2) Subject Elective (Skill based) Major 2 2+3 (2+2) Subject Elective (Skill based) Major 3 2+3 (2+2) General Elective 3+2* (1) General Elective 3+ 2*(1) Project Work (2) TOTAL NO OF HOURS(CREDITS) 35 (22) 35 (26) 35+2* (23) 35+2* (26) 36 (30) 36 (33)
  26. 26. Subject Semester I Semester II Semester III Semester IV Semester V Semester VI English 04 (2) 04 (2) 04 (2) 04 (2) Language 04 (2) 04 (2) 04 (2) 04 (2) Foundation Course Indian Heritage & Culture 1 1 (1) - - Science & Civilization - - 1 1 (1) Environmental Education 1 1 1 1 (1) Fundamentals in IT (FIT) 1+2 1+2 (1) - - Value Education 1 1 1 1 (1) ALERT (2) NCC/NSS/SPORTS/EXTRA CURRICULAR (1) Major 1 6 (6) 6 (6) 6 (6) 6 (6) 5 (5) 5 (5) Major 2 6 (6) 6 (6) 6 (6) 6 (6) 5 (5) 5 (5) Major 3 6 (6) 6 (6) 6 (6) 6 (6) 5 (5) 5 (5) Subject Elective (Special) Major 1 5 (5) Subject Elective (Special) Major 2 5 (5) Subject Elective (Special) Major 3 5 (5) Subject Elective (Skill based) Major 1 5 (5) Subject Elective (Skill based) Major 2 5 (5) Subject Elective (Skill based) Major 3 5 (5) General Elective 5 (1) General Elective 5 (1) Project Work (2) TOTAL NO OF HOURS(CREDITS) 32 (22) 32 (26) 34 (23) 34 (26) 30 (30) 30 (33)
  27. 27. Subject Semester I Semester II Semester III Semester IV Semester V Semester VI English 04 (2) 04 (2) 04 (2) 04 (2) Language 04 (2) 04 (2) 04 (2) 04 (2) Foundation Course Indian Heritage & Culture 1 1 (1) - - Science & Civilization - - 1 1 (1) Environmental Education 1 1 1 1 (1) Fundamentals in IT (FIT) 1+2 1+2 (1) - - Value Education 1 1 1 1 (1) ALERT (2) NCC/NSS/SPORTS/EXTRA CURRICULAR (1) No. of Papers( 4+4+4+4+5+5) 18(18) 18(18) 18(18) 18(18) 20(20) 20(20) Subject Elective (Special) - 1 5(5) Subject Elective (Special) 2 5(5) Subject Elective (Skill based) 1 5 (5) Subject Elective (Skill based) 2 5 (5) General Elective 5 (1) General Elective 5 (1) Project Work (2) TOTAL NO OF HOURS(CREDITS) 32 (22) 32 (26) 32(23) 34 (26) 30 (30) 30 (33) OVERALL CREDITS 160
  28. 28. Register No.: XXXXXX Subject 1 Theory courses (800 Marks) T-Total Lab Courses (400 Max. Marks)P-Total Overall 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2 3 4 Credits (C) 4 3 4 4 3 4 3 3 1 2 1 1 Marks (M)X 80 75 80 70 71 75 75 60 586 60 60 65 70 255 70.08% Percentage 73.25% 63.75 G. Point(G) 8 8 8 7 8 8 8 6 6 6 7 7 Grade scale OWAM = ∑(CM)/∑(C) % Range G-Points 91-100 10 81-90 9 71-80 8 61-70 7 CGPA = ∑(CxG) / ∑(C) 51-60 6 40-50 5   06.72 33 2378 33 706512060180225300213280320225320     CGPA45.7 33 246 33 771261824322428322432   Calculation of CGPA 10 Point Scale
  29. 29. Register No.: YYYYYY Subject 1 Theory courses (800 Marks) T-Total Lab Courses (400 Max. Marks)P-Total Overall 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2 3 4 Credits (C) 4 3 4 4 3 4 3 3 1 2 1 1 Marks (M)Y 60 65 60 70 72 72 70 67 536 85 80 75 72 312 70.66% Percentage 67% 78% G. Point(G) 6 7 6 7 8 8 7 7 9 8 8 8 Grading scale OWAM = ∑(CM)/∑(C) % Range G-Points 91-100 10 81-90 9 71-80 8 61-70 7 CGPA = ∑(CxG) / ∑(C) 51-60 6 40-50 5   54.68 33 2262 33 727516085201210288216280240195240     CGPA15.7 33 263 33 881692121322428242124   Calculation of CGPA 10 Point Scale
  30. 30. Register No.: XXXXXX Theory courses (800 Marks) T-Total Lab Courses (400 Max. Marks)P-Total Overall 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2 3 4 Credits (C) 4 3 4 4 3 4 3 3 1 2 1 1 Marks (M)X 80 75 80 70 71 75 75 60 586 60 60 65 70 255 70.08% Percentage 73.25% 63.75 G. Point(G) 8 8 8 7 8 8 8 6 6 6 7 7 Register No.: YYYYYY 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2 3 4 Credits (C) 4 3 4 4 3 4 3 3 1 2 1 1 Marks (M)Y 60 65 60 70 72 72 70 67 536 85 80 75 72 312 70.66% Percentage 67% 78% G. Point(G) 6 7 6 7 8 8 7 7 9 8 8 8 Grade scale % Range G-Points 91-100 10 81-90 9 71-80 8 61-70 7 51-60 6 40-50 5 Calculation of CGPA 10 Point Scale
  31. 31. OWAM = ∑(CM)/∑(C) XXXXX CGPA = ∑(CxG) / ∑(C) XXXXX OWAM = ∑(CM)/∑(C) YYYYY CGPA = ∑(CxG) / ∑(C) YYYYY   54.68 33 2262 33 727516085201210288216280240195240     CGPA15.7 33 263 33 881692121322428242124     CGPA45.7 33 246 33 771261824322428322432     06.72 33 2378 33 706512060180225300213280320225320   Calculation of CGPA 10 Point Scale
  32. 32. THANK YOU

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