Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

The Power Law of Social Media: What CIOs Should Know

945 views

Published on

Talk to be presented at DQLive 2013, Mumbai, India, Dec 11 2013.

Published in: Social Media, Business, Travel
  • Be the first to comment

The Power Law of Social Media: What CIOs Should Know

  1. 1. The Power Law of Social Media What CIOs should know Srinath Srinivasa IIIT Bangalore sri@iiitb.ac.in DQLive 2013, Mumbai, India, Dec 11 2013
  2. 2. Recent new additions to our vocabulary Telemedicine SMS/MMS E­learning / MOOC Net Banking  E­ticketing Creative Commons Tweeting Social media Phishing Hacking Cyberstalking Virus / Spyware / Adware /  Malware Cyber squatting Identity theft Piracy Spam DQLive 2013, Mumbai, India, Dec 11 2013
  3. 3. The “Information Age” The core driving force behind the new vocabulary Comprehensive change brought by information and  communication technologies (ICT) Qualitative changes affecting the underlying mental  model or the “paradigm” Changes affecting the way we live (not just businesses) Separation of information transactions from material  transactions DQLive 2013, Mumbai, India, Dec 11 2013
  4. 4. The “Information Age” Information exchange network e, obil m net, r Inte tc s, e se aba dat Material exchange network DQLive 2013, Mumbai, India, Dec 11 2013
  5. 5. Material versus Information Information Exchange Material Exchange Constrained by the laws of physics  Conserved transactions  High cost of replication and   transportation Material affects what we have and how  we live Intangible (little or no physical constraints) Non­conserved transactions Extremely low replication costs  transportation costs with today´s ICT, leading  do formation of frictionless systems Hard to “snatch away” internalized  information Information affects  who we are! DQLive 2013, Mumbai, India, Dec 11 2013
  6. 6. Is this separation natural? Image source: Wikipedia, HSTA Note the separation between material and information logistics.  Nature is already in the information age since several millenia! DQLive 2013, Mumbai, India, Dec 11 2013
  7. 7. Networks compared.. Material networks – – Exchange of resources (and  in turn, energy) Waste disposal Information networks – – Control Semantics DQLive 2013, Mumbai, India, Dec 11 2013
  8. 8. What “flows” in an information network? Information? Well yes.. But that is not the whole story.. DQLive 2013, Mumbai, India, Dec 11 2013
  9. 9. What “flows” in an information network? Elements that “flow” on a social information  network include elements of human cognition,  like: ● Attention ● Emotional state ● Trust ● Novelty ● Acquaintance ● etc. DQLive 2013, Mumbai, India, Dec 11 2013
  10. 10. Memory Processes Declarative memory Procedural memory Reflexes Semantic Motor control Episodic Working memory Active mental model Emotional state (System 1) DQLive 2013, Mumbai, India, Dec 11 2013 Long-term memory
  11. 11. Memory Processes Skills, reflexes from Procedural memory Conscious thinking Managed by Working memory DQLive 2013, Mumbai, India, Dec 11 2013 Theoretical knowledge from Semantic memory Beliefs about intentions and risk­taking Influenced by our active  Mental model in turn influenced by our emotional state
  12. 12. What “flows” in an information network? Skills, reflexes from Procedural memory Theoretical knowledge from Semantic memory Conscious thinking Managed by Working memory DQLive 2013, Mumbai, India, Dec 11 2013 Beliefs about intentions and risk­taking Influenced by our active  Mental model in turn influenced by our emotional state
  13. 13. The Economics of “Attention”  [Goldhaber 1997] The commodity of scarcity in an  information­rich world: Attention  Takes on different forms in media studies:  Eyeballs, Immersiveness, PageRank, etc.  Attention: The process of concentrating on  one piece of information from the  environment while ignoring all others  DQLive 2013, Mumbai, India, Dec 11 2013
  14. 14. Why does attention matter? DQLive 2013, Mumbai, India, Dec 11 2013 Image Source: Wikipedia
  15. 15. Why does attention matter? Did you ever imagine you'd be thinking about Himalayas /  Tibet / Buddhism when you decided to attend this talk? Attention controls what gets loaded into conscious  (working) memory  Attention is a conserved entity unlike information,  and hence is scarce Extended attention form associations, whether or not  they represent real associations found in nature DQLive 2013, Mumbai, India, Dec 11 2013
  16. 16. Attention Properties of Attention (cf. [BH 04]) Exclusivity: increased attention on an input channel attenuates  attention on other channels Autobiographical: Reference to the subject on an attenuated  channel, increases attention content onto that channel Early selection versus late selection debates and the cocktail party problem Transitivity: Attention by a subject to a speaker can result in the  speaker transferring subject's attention onto a third topic or  speaker DQLive 2013, Mumbai, India, Dec 11 2013
  17. 17. Modalities of Attention Transfer Online Hyperlinks User clicking on a hyperlink transfers attention from  host page to target page PageRank of a page is a measure of overall attention  received by the page by random surfers on the net Twitter followers / subscriptions List of followers of a person indicates people who wish  to pay attention to a person's tweets DQLive 2013, Mumbai, India, Dec 11 2013
  18. 18. Acquaintance Social association between people, acknowledging the existence  and attributes of the other The first stage of several forms of social phenomena like  influence, trust, co­operation, etc. Increasing levels of acquaintance imply increasing levels of  knowledge about the other party Acquaintance directly affects the availability heuristic in  building mental models Acquaintance networks form the basis for several social  phenomena like hiring, dating, doing business with, etc. DQLive 2013, Mumbai, India, Dec 11 2013
  19. 19. Acquaintance Triadic closure A characteristic feature of social acquaintance networks is the property of  Triadic Closure A B C Informally: Two people who have a common friend are likely to become friends themselves. The  more closer they are to their common friend, the more likely is it that they become friends  themselves DQLive 2013, Mumbai, India, Dec 11 2013
  20. 20. Acquaintance and Entrenchment Triadic closure property creates an effect of “entrenchment” in  acquaintance networks  (Image Source: [EK 10]) Entrenched networks: low in novelty, dissonance in beliefs high in mutual familiarity, trust DQLive 2013, Mumbai, India, Dec 11 2013
  21. 21. The Strength of Weak Ties Image Source: [EK 10] Bridges are links connecting two entrenched components of a network.  In social networks, bridges are necessarily “weak links” as strong ties would  have resulted in triadic closure around the bridge. Bridges are the primary  source of novelty in an entrenched network.  A famous paper [Granovetter '73] shows the importance of weak ties in  social networks. People make major decisions of their lives (career,  marriage,...) based on connections obtained from weak ties, rather than  strong ties. DQLive 2013, Mumbai, India, Dec 11 2013
  22. 22. Mental Model A collection of consistent, declarative representations that forms  the axiomatic basis of reasoning (the “box” in which we think) Active mental model Reasoning and deduction carried out within the framework of  the currently active mental model Mental model used for reasoning, influenced by our emotional  state and the intuition sub­system (System 1) Dissonance with active mental model usually elicits an  emotional reaction (laughter, terror, etc.) DQLive 2013, Mumbai, India, Dec 11 2013
  23. 23. Emotional State A physiological configuration (joy, fear, panic, euphoria,...) based on  mental state Affected by dissonance in mental models Affects the choice of active mental model Has the property of emotional contagion – strong emotional states  are mirrored by others in the vicinity Emotional states can “flow” through an information network like  the Internet! DQLive 2013, Mumbai, India, Dec 11 2013
  24. 24. Conformance Asch Conformance Experiments DQLive 2013, Mumbai, India, Dec 11 2013
  25. 25. Diffusion of Ideas Image Source: [Sri 06] Information diffusion is faster in sparsely connected parts of a network,  rather than densely connected (entrenched) parts due to conformance effects. Node d in the above figure does not switch to the new idea because of  conformance pressures from nodes e, f and g DQLive 2013, Mumbai, India, Dec 11 2013
  26. 26. Mental Models, Weak Ties and the  Emotional Contagion DQLive 2013, Mumbai, India, Dec 11 2013
  27. 27. Mental Models, Weak Ties and the  Emotional Contagion DQLive 2013, Mumbai, India, Dec 11 2013
  28. 28. Mental Models, Weak Ties and the  Emotional Contagion DQLive 2013, Mumbai, India, Dec 11 2013
  29. 29. Mental Models, Weak Ties and the  Emotional Contagion DQLive 2013, Mumbai, India, Dec 11 2013
  30. 30. Mental Models, Weak Ties and the  Emotional Contagion DQLive 2013, Mumbai, India, Dec 11 2013
  31. 31. Mental Models, Weak Ties and the  Emotional Contagion DQLive 2013, Mumbai, India, Dec 11 2013
  32. 32. Spread of Ideas  and the  Emotional Contagion Spread of ideas hampered by entrenchment effects and conformance  pressures Spread of emotions facilitated in entrenched and tightly­knit  networks Information age interactions typically span mental models Interaction across mental­models increases dissonance and  emotionally charged conversations Emotions spread faster on the Internet than ideas! DQLive 2013, Mumbai, India, Dec 11 2013
  33. 33. Crowds, Herds and Mobs Crowds ● A shared­attention group debating about a topic ● Rich in diversity of viewpoints and argumentation ● Wisdom of the Crowd Herds ● A shared mental­model group, all possessing the same or similar beliefs ● Potent in strength of conviction of beliefs ● Unwise as a collective and potentially manipulable  ● Herd Mentality Mobs ● A shared emotional­state group, all possessing the same emotional state, but no  shared mental model or attention ● Extremely unpredictable, unwise and potent as a collective ● Mob fury DQLive 2013, Mumbai, India, Dec 11 2013
  34. 34. Takeaways for CIOs Social Media a great tool for fighting entrenchment effects and infusing  novelty Increase in novelty comes at a cost – dissonance in mental models  leading to turmoil, distrust and defensiveness Creating awareness about critical thinking, dispassionate  argumentation and emotional contagions, very important to create  wise  crowds, rather than herds or mobs Wise crowds self­regulate and offer rich outcomes, while unwise herds  or mobs not only pose hurdles, but also resist being regulated So.. get it right the first time..! DQLive 2013, Mumbai, India, Dec 11 2013
  35. 35. Takeaways for CIOs Ingredients of a great online social experience: ● Shared attention ● Diversity in mental models ● No dominant emotional state ● Dispassionate and objective argumentation DQLive 2013, Mumbai, India, Dec 11 2013
  36. 36. Thank You! DQLive 2013, Mumbai, India, Dec 11 2013
  37. 37. References [BH 04] Claus Bundesen, Thomas Habekost. Attention. In Lamberts, K.  Goldstone, R. (Eds.) Handbook of Cognition, SAGE Publications, 2004. [GoldHaber 97] Michael H. Goldhaber. The Attention Economy and the Net. First  Monday, Volume 2, Number 4 ­ 7 April 1997.  [Granovetter 73] Mark S Granovetter. The strength of weak ties. American  journal of sociology (1973): 1360­1380. [EK 10] David Easley, Jon Kleinberg. Networks, Crowds and Markets: Reasoning  about a Highly Connected World. Cambridge University Press, 2010. [Sri 06] Srinath Srinivasa. The Power­Law of Information: Life in a Connected  World. Response Books, Sage Publishers, 2006.  DQLive 2013, Mumbai, India, Dec 11 2013

×