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Writing Transitions

Writing Transitions

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Writing Transitions

  1. 1. Writing Smooth Transitions
  2. 2. Transitions are words or phrases that establish logical connections between sentences, paragraphs, and sections of your essays. What’s a Transition?
  3. 3. Transitions between paragraphs: • Will highlight the relationship that already exists between two paragraphs by summarizing the previous paragraph and suggesting something that will be part of the content in the paragraph that follows. What’s a Transition? Transitions between sentences: • Transitions within paragraphs act as cues by helping readers to anticipate what is coming before they read it. They can show the relationship between the idea in one sentence and the idea in the next.
  4. 4. Examples: Think of a transition sentence as a bridge that goes from one place to another. If the bridge is too short or not properly constructed, it can be a jarring experience. There are many bridges in writing. For instance, ‘warty characters’ (characters that have physical, emotional, or psychological flaws), act as a bridge to help the reader separate side characters from the main character. Imagery is another bridge, as it connects written words to the five senses. Likewise, transition sentences are a bridge that carry the reader from a previous topic or sentence to a new one.
  5. 5. Examples: Show similarity between one idea and the next: also, in the same way, just as … so too, likewise, similarly, Show a sequence or order of ideas: first, second, third, … next, then, finally, Simple Transitions
  6. 6. Examples: Show that one idea contrasts from another, or is an exception to the previous statement: but, however, in spite of, on the one hand…on the other hand, nevertheless, nonetheless, notwithstanding, in contrast, on the contrary, still, yet, Show emphasis on an idea: even, indeed, in fact, of course, Simple Transitions
  7. 7. Examples: Show how ideas are related to time: after, afterward, at last, before, currently, during, earlier, immediately, later, meanwhile, now, recently, simultaneously, subsequently, then, Simple Transitions
  8. 8. Examples: Introduce an example: for example, for instance, namely, specifically, significantly, to illustrate, Show how ideas are related to location: above, adjacent, below, beyond, here, in front, in back, nearby, there, Simple Transitions
  9. 9. Examples: Include additional support or evidence: additionally, again, also, and, as well, besides, equally important, further, furthermore, in addition, moreover, Simple Transitions
  10. 10. Examples: Show how one idea causes/ effects another: accordingly, consequently, hence, so, therefore, thus, because… Show conclusion of ideas: finally, in a word, in brief, in the end, on the whole, thus, to conclude, to summarize, Simple Transitions
  11. 11. Simple vs. Subtle Transitions Simple Transition: • Short, common words and phrases that connect ideas. This are perfectly acceptable to use, as long as you don’t rely on them too much. The danger of simple transitions is that they might sound cliche. Subtle Transition: • “Subtle” means indirect, or not obvious. A subtle transition is a link between ideas that is less obvious than making a statement like “in conclusion” or “similarly.” Subtle transitions are more difficult to write, and therefore, more interesting to read.
  12. 12. Word Link Last sentence of previous paragraph about Jedi robes: • …the Jedi robe is elegant, and would look great at state dinners. First sentences of next paragraph about Jedi light sabers: • The robe is impressive, but not half as impressive as a light saber. Many state leaders have worn ceremonial swords throughout history, so why not wear a light saber?…
  13. 13. Word Link Last sentence of previous paragraph about Jedi robes: • …the Jedi robe is elegant, and would look great at state dinners. First sentences of next paragraph about Jedi light sabers: • The robe is impressive, but not half as impressive as a light saber. Many state leaders have worn ceremonial swords throughout history, so why not wear a light saber?… Repeating a word from the last sentence of the first paragraph in the first sentence of the second paragraph creates a connection.
  14. 14. Idea Link Last sentence of previous paragraph about Jedi robes: • …the Jedi robe is elegant, and would look great at state dinners. First sentences of next paragraph about Jedi light sabers: • That would probably impress visiting heads of state, but not as much as a light saber hanging from the president’s belt.
  15. 15. Idea Link Last sentence of previous paragraph about Jedi robes: • …the Jedi robe is elegant, and would look great at state dinners. First sentences of next paragraph about Jedi light sabers: • That would probably impress visiting heads of state, but not as much as a light saber hanging from the president’s belt. “That” refers to “the elegant Jedi robe” mentioned in the previous paragraph. It does not make a connection to a single word, but to a longer idea/concept.
  16. 16. Good: Sometimes students need to spend "extra" time doing research because they are not satisfied with what they have found so far in the research process. Also, students often feel rushed during the proofreading stage of their writing process. Better: Sometimes students need to spend "extra" time doing research because they are not satisfied with what they have found so far in the research process. Not only do students need "extra" time for research, they also feel rushed during the proofreading stage of their writing process. Best: Sometimes students need to spend "extra" time doing research because they are not satisfied with what they have found so far in the research process. Because students often have to spend more time than anticipated working through earlier stages of the writing process, such as researching, they frequently feel rushed during the proofreading stage of their writing process.

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