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Inclusive Tourism Marketing Toolkit        Workbook for collecting key information on              Accommodation and Resor...
What is Inclusive Tourism?All sorts of terms have been used to describe this growingmarket from Barrier Free Tourism in th...
Customers who have specific access needs are part of every tourism “segment”. Their interestsare as wide as any other grou...
Improved accessibility – a commercial success for ScandicScandic is intensifying its successful focus on improvedaccessibi...
The Spirit of Inclusive Travel                                                  I travel because I want my mind and my hea...
BUILDING ENTRANCEIs designated disabled parking provided near the reception          Yes/Noentrance?                      ...
ACCESS TO PUBLIC AREASIs there level access (with no steps or thresholds), or access      Yes/Noby a ramp or lift to publi...
What is the width of the clear opening of the bedroom door?                     cmCan the bedroom furniture be re-arranged...
Is there is a bath?                                                 Yes/No       What is the height of the rim from the fl...
Can your catering staff provide meals for guests with special (Please tick thosedietary requirements?                     ...
Do you provide disability equipment for guest use?               (Please tick) • Commode chairs • Shower/bath chairs      ...
About TravabilityOver the last four years, Travability has been developing accessible information on tourist destinations....
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Forrester - Accommodation

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  • This useful guideline describes how to collect accessibility information and measure some key spaces and installations in accommodation premises. This is the first phase of marketing your inclusive accommodation. You must know what you've got before you can sell it! Understanding WHY all these points are important comes from observing and listening to your guests. If you think some things need fixing to improve the access or if you are not sure about how to present access information on your website, then it's a good idea to talk to an access advisor. You can get in touch with the author of this Toolkit or contact ENAT for more information.
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Forrester - Accommodation

  1. 1. Inclusive Tourism Marketing Toolkit Workbook for collecting key information on Accommodation and Resorts Prepared by Travability Pty. Ltd. Phone 0417 690 533 Email bill@travability.travel
  2. 2. What is Inclusive Tourism?All sorts of terms have been used to describe this growingmarket from Barrier Free Tourism in the United Kingdom,Accessible Tourism in Australia, Access Tourism in NewZealand. All of those terms have their foundations basedon the physical term of “access” More often than not thoseexpressions also have a narrow interpretation as people thinkof them applying only to travelers with a mobility relateddisability.More correctly what we are describing in talking aboutInclusive Tourism is an environment where people of all ages and abilities are felt welcome andwanted as customers and guests.Market SizeFor the first time Inclusive Tourism is being regarded as an economic market driven by the retirementof the baby boomer sector. Inclusive Tourism is already a major tourism sector with Australianresearch putting its value at 11% of the total industry market share. US research by McKinsey &Company predicts that by 2015, the baby boomer generation will command almost 60 percent ofnet U.S. wealth and 40 percent of spending. In many categories, like travel, boomers will representover 50 percent of consumption. The impact on the Inclusive Travel sector is significant as over 40%of them will be retiring with some form of disability, raising the total value of the Inclusive Tourismsector to over 25% of the market by 2020.There are myths in the marketplace that suggest that people with a disability travel far less than thegeneral population, however, the 2008 Australian National Visitor Survey estimated the following: • Some 88% of people with disability take a holiday each year that accounted for some 8.2 million overnight trips. • The average travel group size for people with a disability is 2.8 people for a domestic overnight trip and 3.4 for a day trip. • There is a myth that the inclusive tourism market does not spend because of economic circumstance. That is false as it is a significant proportion of each travel market segment. • They travel on a level comparable with the general population for domestic overnight and day trips. • The total tourism expenditure attributable to the group is $8bn per year or 11% of overall tourism expenditure. “American adults with disabilities or reduced mobility currently spend an average of $13. 6 billion a year on travel. Creating accessible cruise ships, accessible ship terminals, accessible ground transportation, and accessible tourist destinations is not charity. It is just good business.” Dr Scott Rains. a US expert on disability issuesEnhance your Utilisation by providing the right informationThe Victorian Competition and Efficiency Commission’s draftreport on the barriers facing Victorian Tourism expressed someconcern over the cost and lack of utilisation of accessiblerooms. A review of the accessibility requirements, however,argued business could address this low use of accessible roomsby more carefully designing accessible rooms, educating staffand better marketing to older people as well as people with adisability. Accommodation Accessibility Toolkit - Version 1.8 © Travability 2012
  3. 3. Customers who have specific access needs are part of every tourism “segment”. Their interestsare as wide as any other group of people. They may be looking for mountain adventures, concertperformances, a seat at the AFL Grand Final, a honeymoonhotel or a business lunch. In business terms, they are simply‘customers’ but they need good access – otherwise they willchoose to go elsewhere. They also travel with family and friendsso you could not just be losing one customer but potentiallymany more. It is about gaining market share.Key elements are: • Don’t assume all disabilities are the same • Don’t hide the information, put it where the rest of the facility information is. Bookings are often made by friends, family or employers. Headings such as “special facilities” or “compliance requirements” are meaningless and demeaning. • Provide enough detail • Use photographs of your accessible facilities • Include people with a disability in your general marketing and imageryPurpose of this guideDesign that caters for the needs of everyone is formally known as Universal Design or Design for All.Sometimes the smallest things like providing a walking stick holder at your reception desk, makingsure planter boxes are not placed below lift call buttons and ensuring bathroom and kitchen tapsprovide purchase for those with a poor grip, can make a huge difference to the experience of yourguests. This guide encourages owners and operators to take a fresh look at their premises from thepoint of view of someone with a disability. Further, good design for someone with a disability isbetter design for everyone and will be appreciated by young families with prams and pushers, theelderly and for businessmen with heavy suitcases. The Scandic case study, on the following page,shows how providing a design that caters for everyone results in commercial returns, by increasedutilization and customer satisfaction and loyalty.The workbook is not a statutory audit checklist, it is designedto be used as a “walkthrough” tool to enable you to collectinformation on your facilities. It collects the sort of data thatis important to a various range of disabilities and will allowpeople with a disability to make an informed decision as towhether a facility is suitable for them or not.Most of the data collected with this guide should be availableon your web site. The best facilities will remain invisible toyour potential customers if they are not promoted. Terms suchas “we have an accessible room” is largely meaningless as isthe simple use of the “wheelchair” disability symbol. Havinga tag line of “call us for accessibility information” is puttingpotential customers at a disadvantage over other customers searching on the internet and potentiallyputting your establishment at a competitive disadvantage over your competitors.Further AssistanceIf you require further assistance in conducting an audit of your facility or in putting together yourmarketing information contact us at bill@travability.info Accommodation Accessibility Toolkit - Version 1.8 © Travability 2012
  4. 4. Improved accessibility – a commercial success for ScandicScandic is intensifying its successful focus on improvedaccessibility. This year, over 100 new rooms for disabledwill be added to the portfolio and 2012 there will beeven more to meet the large and growing demand. Moreand more companies and organisations seek rooms andconference facilities that are accessible to all. At the sametime the numbers of older, active private travellers whoare attracted by improved accessibility are increasing.Improving accessibility has proven to be a commercialsuccess for Scandic, the Nordic region’s leading hotel Photographer: Jonas Hessmanchain.Design for All is a key concept in Scandic’s accessibility work. The aim is for the rooms for disabledto be just as well designed as any other room, with practical solutions that go almost unnoticed,except by those who really need them. Hooks, mirrors and keyholes at two heights are appreciatedby children, short adults and those who use a wheelchair. Height-adjustable beds and extra spaciousbathrooms are popular with all guests. Scandic’s comprehensive 110-point accessibility programmecovers everything from team member training to adapted rooms and extensive, detailed accessibilityinformation on every hotel’s website.“When we take over a hotel, we implement our accessibility programme within three months and,after just one year, we tend to notice more bookings from private guests and from companies andorganisations, thanks to our accessibility work. This gives us a clear competitive advantage and, aswell as showing our commitment to social responsibility, we see major commercial benefits in beingaccessible to all,” relates Anders Ehrling, President and CEO of Scandic.New hotels require smart new solutionsA lowered reception desk for wheelchair users, a guest computer in the lobby at a comfortable heightfor a wheelchair and an ordinary chair, a hearing loop in conference facilities and reception, andvibrating alarm clocks that also hear the fire alarms are just some examples of smart solutions thatensure a high level of accessibility. Scandic’s accessibility work remains a core focus in its new andrefurbished hotels, with numerous examples of best practice:With Scandic Victoria Tower, the new spectacular 34-floor hotel in Kista, Stockholm, Scandic showsthat it is perfectly possible to offer rooms for disabled with fantastic views high up in the building,with the help of fire-safe elevators that allow wheelchair users to evacuate the building easily.The flagship Scandic Grand Central opening soon in central Stockholm (Oct 2011) proves that it isalso possible to incorporate accessibility into a 130-year-old property.This year Scandic Sydhavnen in Copenhagen will become Scandic’s most accessible hotel inDenmark, offering 11 new rooms for disabled and reception, restaurant and conference area all on theentrance level, with easy access from the car park.“We have worked hard on accessibility for eight years and learned a great deal about these complexissues, but there is of course plenty still to do,” states Magnus Berglund, Disability Ambassador atScandic. “We have entered an exciting phase, where interest and bookings show our accessibility workis appreciated by many more people than just the guests with a disability.” Accommodation Accessibility Toolkit - Version 1.8 © Travability 2012
  5. 5. The Spirit of Inclusive Travel I travel because I want my mind and my heart and my soul to overcome the boundaries that my body now feels. I travel in spite of the fact that it is “inconvenient” in that I am unable to walk onto the plane or to simply stand up and use the bathroom when needed, or that I have to spend innumerable hours planning and seeking out where I may be able to go in a wheelchair; what I will be able to see and where will accommodate me once I reach my chosen destination. I travel because to do so puts me in the realm of saying “HA! Look at me now!” I can do and be and see and experience this wonderfulHaving fun in the Everglades world. I CAN taste, smell, delight in the people and remarkable sights and win in the battle of my bodyover my spirit.I was a dancer and I was 18 when I crashed my car in front of theMormon Chapel on the Maryland beltway. I broke my neck andwas told I will never move from the neck down again. Yet, I heard avoice as I lay alone in the night..-”you will not be able to move your legs..but it will not be permanentand there is a purpose”I accepted this, moved on and regained the use of my arms andhands…just like the voice said.So I go--and I relish in the next trip--the next challenge that I WILLover come. I am not a wheelchair sports jock-never raced in mychair or played tennis or rugby or wheelchair basketball. Traveland love is how I survive. I take my love and my will with me andI look strangers in strange lands in the eye as I roll by and I amsaying to myself and to everyone who sees me that WE are notpathetic, sad, miserable cripples…WE are here and we want to share the world with you….it is upto me to show you I will come--it is up to you to show me I am Deborah in Stockholmwelcome.Deborah DavisAs published in the New York Times. Accommodation Accessibility Toolkit - Version 1.8 © Travability 2012
  6. 6. BUILDING ENTRANCEIs designated disabled parking provided near the reception Yes/Noentrance? mWhat is the distance from the entrance?Is it under cover? Yes/NoAre there any steps to the main entrance? Yes/No Number Hand Rail No One Side Both Sides Contrast Edge marking Yes/NoIs there a ramp to the main entrance? Yes/No Width cm Slope 1/ Cross slope 1/ Handrail No One Side Both Sides Height cmWhat is the width of the clear opening space at the mainentrance door? cmDoor Type? Tick at least one Manual Automatic Revolving with alternative side-hung manual door Revolving with NO alternative side-hung manual door OtherFOYERIs there clear access to reception? Yes/NoIs the signage clear and contrasting print? Yes/NoIs there a lowered section of the reception desk? Yes/NoIs a walking stick rack provided? Yes/NoIs seating provided in the foyer? Yes/NoIs assistance with luggage available? Yes/NoLIFTIs there a lift? Yes/No If “No” please go to next section What is the width of the clear opening space at the lift- door? cm What is the internal width of the lift? cm What is the internal depth of the lift? cm Is there a verbal announcement for stops at each floor? Yes/No Do the lift buttons have raised numbers or letters? Yes/No Are the lift foyer buttons within easy reach? (ie not Yes/No obstructed by planter boxes or other floor decorations) Accommodation Accessibility Toolkit - Version 1.8 © Travability 2012
  7. 7. ACCESS TO PUBLIC AREASIs there level access (with no steps or thresholds), or access Yes/Noby a ramp or lift to public areas: • Dining Photos of each main • Bar area. • Lounge • Swimming Pool • Beach • Sports Area • Terrace • Garden • Picnic Facilities • BBQ • Other (Please List)BREAKFAST / DINING ROOMIs there level access (with no steps or thresholds), or by ramp Yes/Noor lift to the breakfast / dining-room?What is the width of the clear opening space at the entrance Photos of entrancedoor to the breakfast / dining-room? cm tables and serveryIs there a choice of dining tables with moveable chairs and Yes/Noaccess?GUEST ROOMSAre there rooms, with en-suite bathrooms, intended for Yes/Noguests who use a wheelchair?If “YES” please complete all questions in the followingtwo sections). If “No” please go to SPECIAL SERVICESsection belowIs designated disabled parking provided for each room? Yes/NoDistance from room? mIs it undercover? Yes/NoHow many rooms are available for guests who use awheelchair? • Standard • Deluxe • Executive • Suite • OtherDo these rooms have level access (including access by a Yes/Noramp or lift) from the entrance of the establishment to doorof the guest room? Accommodation Accessibility Toolkit - Version 1.8 © Travability 2012
  8. 8. What is the width of the clear opening of the bedroom door? cmCan the bedroom furniture be re-arranged, if requested by Yes/Nothe guest? Entrance from interior vestibuleWhat is the widest free space at the side of the bed? cmWhich types of beds are available in rooms for wheelchair (tick at least one)users? • One double/queen bed/king bed Photo of each layout • One single bed • Two single beds • Two double/queen • One double/queen and one single • Other (Please describe)What is the height of the bed from the floor to the top of themattress? cmWhat is the clear space height from the floor to under the bedbase? cmWhat is the height to the top of the desk? cmWhat is the clear space height from the floor to under the topof the desk? cmWhat is the height of the clothes rail in the wardrobe? cmElectrical switches • Is there a free power outlet near the bed? Yes/No • What is the height of the light switches? cm • What is the height of the power outlets? cm • Is there a master switch in the bedside unit? Yes/NoEN-SUITE BATHROOM FOR WHEELCHAIR USERSWhat is the width of the clear opening of the bathroom door? cmIs the bathroom entrance level with the adjacent floor? Yes/NoIs there a separate shower with level access (no raised Yes/No Photos showingshower tray or step-up)? shower, bath, toilet, circulation space andIf there is a raised or sunk shower tray, what is the height of basin.the step into it? cmIf it is a shower cubicle, what is the clear opening space ofthe door? cmIs a fixed shower seat or shower chair provided? Yes/NoAre there handrails for support beside the shower? Yes/NoIf there is a shower seat, what height is it from the floor? cmAre there handrails for support beside the toilet? Yes/No Fixed or HingedWhat is the width of the widest floor space at the side of thetoilet cmWhat is the length of the floor space in front of the toilet cmWhat is the height of the toilet seat from the floor? cmIs there an emergency call system in the bathroom? Yes/No Accommodation Accessibility Toolkit - Version 1.8 © Travability 2012
  9. 9. Is there is a bath? Yes/No What is the height of the rim from the floor? cm What is the depth of the bath floor from the rim? cmIf there are grab bars or handrails, at what height are they? cmWhat is the height of the sink? cmWhat is the height from the floor to the bottom of the sink? cmWhat is the height from the floor to the base of the mirror? cmIs there an adjustable magnifying mirror? Yes/NoKITCHENETTE/KITCHENDoes your accommodation have a kitchen/kitchenette? Yes/NoIf “no” go to “Special Services”All measurements are from floor level Photo/s showingWhat is the height of the bench tops? cm kitchen layout and appliancesWhat is the width of the bench tops? cmWhat is the width of the working space? cmWhat is the height is the hot plate? cmWhat are the height of the hotplate controls? cmWhat is the height of the oven if provided? cmWhat is the height of the microwave if provided? cmWhat is the height of the cupboards containing: • Cooking equipment? cm • Cutlery? cm • Crockery? cmWhat is the height of the power outlets? cmSPECIAL SERVICESIs 24-hour guest service provided? Yes/NoAre service dogs allowed in your premises? Yes/NoIf service dogs are allowed in your premises, are they Yes/Noallowed to stay in bedrooms?If not is there a special pet enclosure? Yes/NoDo you provide services for guests with hearing (Please tick)impairments? • Text telephone • Emergency call system with vibrating pads (if fire alarm is activated) • Emergency call system with flashing lights (if fire alarm is activated) • Other (please describe) • None of the above Accommodation Accessibility Toolkit - Version 1.8 © Travability 2012
  10. 10. Can your catering staff provide meals for guests with special (Please tick thosedietary requirements? that apply) • Sugar free (diabetic) • Gluten free (celiacs) • Lactose free (diary free) • Low fat and fibre with no gastric content • Low potassium • Low sodium • Nut free • Additive free • Organic • Vegetarian • Vegan • Kosher • Halal • Other (please list below) • None of the aboveDo you provide services for guests with asthma or allergies? (Please tick) • Non-smoking rooms • Rooms with non-allergic bedding (e.g. non-feather pillows) • Rooms with no fitted carpets,… • Non-smoking area in the bar/restaurant/… • Other (please describe) • None of the aboveDo you provide services for guests with visual impairments? (Please tick) • Contrast markings on glass doors and full-height windows • Guest information in large print format • Restaurant/bar menus/bar prices available in large print format • Well lit areas of restaurants and bars • Tactile route within or outside the premises • Audible alarm system • Other: • None of the aboveDo you provide other special services for elderly and/or Yes/Nodisabled guests?If yes please describe Accommodation Accessibility Toolkit - Version 1.8 © Travability 2012
  11. 11. Do you provide disability equipment for guest use? (Please tick) • Commode chairs • Shower/bath chairs Photos of each piece • Lifts of equipment. • Beach/pool wheelchairs • Pool lift • Other (please describe)Do you have information on accessible local attractions and Yes/Nothings to do? • Theatres Photos of accessible • Restaurants, cafes and bars attractions will make • Parks and Gardens your facility more • Beaches attractive to travellers • Recreation facilities with a disability • Tours • Fishing areas • Accessible/easy walks • Points of interestDo you have information on accessible local public Yes/Notransport? • Trains • Trams • Buses • Taxis Accommodation Accessibility Toolkit - Version 1.8 © Travability 2012
  12. 12. About TravabilityOver the last four years, Travability has been developing accessible information on tourist destinations.We have continually refined our presentation style and level of detail as a result of continual feedback.We are members of SATH (Society for Accessible Travel and Hospitality), ENAT (European Network forAccessible Tourism) and Tour Watch the world incubator for Accessible Tourism. We are acknowledgedas global thought leaders on inclusive tourism and the economic impact the sector will have on the travelindustry over the next ten years.We have presented at international forums including: • SATH World Congresses in 2009 and 2011 • Inaugural Access Tourism New Zealand Conference in October 2010We have developed the Accessible Information Evaluation Model for Parks Victoria and conducted theinitial pilot studies.In 2011 we are a finalist in the National Disability Awards.We will be presenting on the Economics of Accessible Tourism at Interdependence 2012 sponsored by theRick Hansen Foundation in May of this year.Bill ForresterBill was born and raised in Melbourne, Australia. As a child he was fortunateto travel to many parts of the world and to learn and appreciate culturesother than his own. That passion for learning and understanding has neverleft him. Bill spent most of his working life in the corporate field in bothfinancial and operation roles. He specialised in corporate and cultural change.He has extensive experience in facility management, major project delivery,stakeholder relations and corporate training programs. He has worked in theprivate, mutual, and government sectors. Five years ago he left the corporateworld and bought three retail travel agencies in Melbourne to pursue his loveof travel.Recognising that there was a lack of information of accessible tourismfacilities, three years ago, Bill formed Travability with a mission to changethe way the tourist industry viewed travellers with disabilities and the wayaccessible information was made available. Deborah Davis Deborah has been a founding inspiration in the creation of Travability. She was born and raised in Maryland and moved to Miami in 1984. She was involved in a car accident at the age of 18 sustaining a C6/7 spinal cord injury resulting in incomplete quadriplegia. Deborah has had a successful career in the medical sales field and was the Director of Abilities Florida. She has extensive experience in developing and conducting training programs on disability awareness and the seamless inclusion of accessible facilities. She has a wealth of experience in marketing. She is well travelled and enjoys the thrill of discovering new places. As an active and accomplished individual she is passionate about our dream of making the world accessible to all. Accommodation Accessibility Toolkit - Version 1.8 © Travability 2012

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