Motivational Theory: Using File Folder Games

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Ways that using file folder games in the classroom can be justified by the Motivational Theory by John Keller.

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Motivational Theory: Using File Folder Games

  1. 1. ACCORDING TO JOHN KELLER COMPILED FROM THE WEBSITE: HTTP://IDE.ED.PSU.EDU/IDDE/ARCS.HTM Motivational Theory and Using File Folder Games in the Classroom
  2. 2. Four Categories of Motivation <ul><li>1. Attention </li></ul><ul><li>2. Relevance </li></ul><ul><li>3. Confidence </li></ul><ul><li>4. Satisfaction </li></ul>
  3. 3. 1. Attention *”Who wants to play a game?” *”You can choose from these two games to play!” *”Here is a game using Mickey Mouse characters!”
  4. 4. Perceptual Arousal <ul><li>“ Let’s stop reading and play a game instead!” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Look at this game using worms!” </li></ul>
  5. 5. Inquiry Arousal <ul><li>File folder games can get a student thinking about a new concept </li></ul>
  6. 6. Variability <ul><li>File folder games give a different way to learn and practice information. </li></ul>
  7. 7. 2. Relevance *File folder games can connect students to content they enjoy and to information learning in the classroom
  8. 8. Familiarity <ul><li>File folders are great examples </li></ul><ul><li>File folders can be adapted for individual personalities and preferences. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Goal Orientation <ul><li>File folders have an achievable goal: complete the game using the directions. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Motive Matching <ul><li>File folders can motivate an unmotivated student because they are playing a game that matches their interests </li></ul>
  11. 11. 3. Confidence *Completing games can give students confidence that they are successful *Letting students self-correct lets them gain confidence in themselves
  12. 12. Expectancy for Success <ul><li>Directions on the games let students know the expectancy of the game </li></ul>
  13. 13. Challenge Setting <ul><li>File folder games can challenge students to try a new concept. </li></ul><ul><li>Goals can be set to complete a certain number of games. </li></ul>
  14. 14. Attribution Molding <ul><li>File folder games are self-satisfying for students and give a way for teachers to praise students </li></ul>
  15. 15. 4. Satisfaction *File folder games can give students a feeling of accomplishment and satisfaction with their hard work
  16. 16. Natural Consequences <ul><li>File folder games can be set up in simulated, real-world situations </li></ul>
  17. 17. Positive Consequences <ul><li>File folder games are a great way to provide feedback to students </li></ul>
  18. 18. Equity <ul><li>File folders are a great way to keep all students accomplishing work and allow all students to achieve praise </li></ul>
  19. 19. Resources <ul><li>Keller, John. (1983) ARCS – Motivational Theory. Retrieved from http://ide.ed.psu.edu/idde/ARCS.htm October 5, 2009. </li></ul>

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