Chapter 12 1st and 2nd Person Pronouns

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Chapter 12 1st and 2nd Person Pronouns

  1. 1. 1st and 2nd Person Pronouns<br />Chapter 12<br />
  2. 2. Use of Pronouns<br />Pronouns are used in both Latin and English to replace nouns:<br />The man watches the television show. = He watches it.<br />Will plays Mario Brothers. = He plays it.<br />Grandma and Grandpa watched Anna’s recital. They watched her recital. = They watched her recital.<br />
  3. 3. Pronouns in Latin<br />The case of a pronoun is determined by its use in the sentence.<br />A pronoun must agree with its antecedent in gender and number.<br />The antecedent is the word that the pronoun replaces.<br />Example: The boy rides his bike to school. He rides his bike to school. Boy is the antecedent of “He.”<br />
  4. 4. Pronoun Charts<br />In Latin, there are different charts for each type of pronoun.<br />Take the time to memorize these charts. You will be glad you did. They are very difficult to look up. <br />
  5. 5. Ist Person Pronouns<br />Study the following chart:<br />
  6. 6. 2nd Person Pronouns<br />Study the following chart:<br />
  7. 7. Use of 1st & 2nd Person Pronouns<br />Notice that the translations of the cases are very familiar:<br />Nominative case is still used as subject. The use of the pronoun emphasizes the subject, although you could tell the subject by looking at the ending of the verb.<br />Genitive case still uses “of” (possession).<br />Dative case still uses “to” or “for” (indirect object),<br />Accusative is still used for direct objects.<br />Ablative case is still used with prepositions.<br />
  8. 8. Examples<br />You all eat with me.<br />Vosmecum cenatis.<br />Vosis nominative, plural---subject. Although you can tell the subject by looking at the ending of the verb, the vos adds emphasis.<br />Mecum is cum + abl. Notice that when cum is used with prepositions, the cum is tacked onto the end of the preposition.<br />I gave the book to you.<br />Egolibrumtibidonavit.<br />Ego is nominative, singular---subject.<br />Tibi is dative, singiular---indirect object.<br />

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