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Harriet Tubman

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Harriet Tubman

  1. 1. Harriet Tubman “Moses of her People” Kaytee Spitz Ed 205-06
  2. 2. Main Slide <ul><li>Harriet’s Early Life </li></ul><ul><li>Her Escape From Slavery </li></ul><ul><li>Saving Her Family </li></ul><ul><li>Harriet’s Role in the Underground Rail Road </li></ul><ul><li>Master of Disguise </li></ul><ul><li>People She Knew </li></ul><ul><li>Arrival of the Civil War </li></ul><ul><li>Harriet’s life in Auburn, NY </li></ul>Quit
  3. 3. Harriet’s Early Life <ul><li>Harriet Tubman was born Harriet Ross in 1819, in Dorchester County, Maryland. </li></ul><ul><li>She was born into slavery and was put to work by the age of 5. </li></ul><ul><li>She did not like to work inside, she wanted to be outside. </li></ul><ul><li>Harriet was beaten a lot by her masters. She received whippings even when she was really young. </li></ul>Quit
  4. 4. Early Life Continued <ul><li>When Harriet Tubman was 12, she refused to help tie up a slave who had attempted to escape. The white overseer was angry and hit her very hard on the head. After that, Harriet suffered from blackouts. </li></ul><ul><li>When she was 25 years old, Harriet married John Tubman. </li></ul><ul><li>At 30, she feared she would be sold to the south, so she escaped. </li></ul><ul><li>Harriet knew that if she told her husband she was leaving, he would tell on her, so the only person she told was her sister. </li></ul>Quit
  5. 5. Harriet’s Escape from Slavery <ul><li>Harriet escaped at night time. A white neighbor gave her a piece of paper with two names on it. Those names would help her get to freedom. </li></ul><ul><li>Harriet made the 90-mile trip to the Mason-Dixon Line. On her way there, she hiked through swamps and woodlands until she made it to Philadelphia. </li></ul><ul><li>In Philadelphia, Harriet worked as a dishwasher and met William Still, the Philadelphia Station Master on the Underground Rail Road. </li></ul>Quit Click to watch a movie!
  6. 6. Saving Her Family <ul><li>In 1851, Harriet began relocating her family to the North. She started with her sister’s family. Then she helped her brother’s move North. </li></ul><ul><li>Harriet went back to get her husband, but he had remarried and didn’t want anything to do with moving. </li></ul><ul><li>On a fourth trip, Harriet moved her parents. </li></ul>Quit
  7. 7. Harriet’s Role in the UGRR <ul><li>Harriet is known as the “Moses of her People.” In 19 trips south, it is believed that she freed more than 300 slaves! </li></ul>Quit
  8. 8. Master of Disguise <ul><li>Harriet was becoming more well-known and HUGE rewards were offered for her capture. </li></ul><ul><li>Harriet learned to disguise her appearance. When she was walking down a street, she ran into one of her former masters, and he did not recognize her. </li></ul>Quit
  9. 9. People Harriet Knew <ul><li>Harriet was closely associated with Abolitionist, John Brown. </li></ul><ul><li>She was also very well acquainted with Frederick Douglass, Jermain Loguen and Gerrit Smith. </li></ul>Quit
  10. 10. Arrival of the Civil War <ul><li>During the Civil War, Harriet served as a soldier, a spy for the Union Army and also as a nurse in Washington D.C. </li></ul><ul><li>She served at Fortress Monroe, where Jefferson Davis would later be imprisoned at. And while guiding a group of black soldiers in South Carolina, she met Nelson Davis. </li></ul>Quit
  11. 11. Life in Auburn, NY <ul><li>After the Civil War, Harriet married Nelson Davis and helped Auburn to remain a center of activity in support of Women’s Rights. </li></ul><ul><li>In 1896, Harriet bought land to build a home for sick and needy blacks, but could not afford to build a house. She gave the land to the African Methodist Episcopalzion Church. </li></ul><ul><li>Harriet lived happily telling the story of her life until she died at the age of 93. </li></ul>Quit
  12. 12. References <ul><li>www.nyhistory.com </li></ul><ul><li>www.incwell.com/biographies </li></ul><ul><li>www.teachertube.com </li></ul>Quit
  13. 13. Quit
  14. 14. About the Author <ul><li>Kaytee Spitz is a third year student at Grand Valley State University. She is a Mathematics Major with an Emphasis in Elementary Education. </li></ul>Quit

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