Monitoring B2B: A Different Approach to Social Media

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http://spiral16.com Social media monitoring is becoming a critical part of the equation that many businesses rely on to stay competitive but some companies are confused about how to monitor for their specific needs. B2B marketers have an especially hard time with this. Additionally, B2B monitoring is quite different from B2C social media monitoring. This presentation is designed to focus on effective B2B monitoring tactics and strategies and how you can implement them in your organization.

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  • Blogpost Average: Enough content to fill the New York Times every day for 19 years.
    1.6 million of which concerned with the Star Wars universe.
    ¾) Ah, productivity.

    Largest unstructured dataset in human history.

  • Who/What/Where/When/How
  • Businesses need to know how it impacts bottom line.
    How can information from monitoring social media and the web help your company?
    Listening, monitoring is not just for giant consumer brands or Fortune 500 corporations. Businesses of all sizes, industries can gain an edge through monitoring.
  • We can’t treat B2B like B2C, even though both sides may expect the other to behave the same.
  • When your target customer isn’t identifying themselves, you need to know what topics lead to you.
    Product language can be vague and challenging. Work with a team that can translate your language into searchable terms.
    One size does not fit all in regards to data. Find a tool that outputs information in accordance with your resources and ability to act on it.
    Understanding is very often a trick of shifting perception to look at familiar things a different way. Variety of reporting ensures there’s more than one way to reach “Ah-Ha”
  • 1)
    2)
    3) How loud is your message? How often is it repeated?
    4) Does your message or audience reside on blogs? Traditional news sources online? Social networks and communities? Or within the realm of general reference?
  • Full service marketing agency outside Chicago, IL
    The questions they wanted answered:
  • Site Type discussion (Order: HubGroup/C.H. Robinson/J.B. Hunt/Scheider National/Union Pacific)

    By examining where information resides, we can discover how well a brand is broadcasting, and whether they control their message.
    We can also use site types to predict what types of information a customer or individual is more likely to discover on their own, allowing brands to tailor their communication strategies to take advantage of where conversation already occurs.

    Note: Knowing where conversations already resides allows you to skip the often resource-intensive step of building your own portals or communities in the hopes that someone shows up.
  • Site Type discussion (Order: HubGroup/C.H. Robinson/J.B. Hunt/Scheider National/Union Pacific)

    By examining where information resides, we can discover how well a brand is broadcasting, and whether they control their message.
    We can also use site types to predict what types of information a customer or individual is more likely to discover on their own, allowing brands to tailor their communication strategies to take advantage of where conversation already occurs.

    Note: Knowing where conversations already resides allows you to skip the often resource-intensive step of building your own portals or communities in the hopes that someone shows up.
  • Site Type discussion (Order: HubGroup/C.H. Robinson/J.B. Hunt/Scheider National/Union Pacific)

    By examining where information resides, we can discover how well a brand is broadcasting, and whether they control their message.
    We can also use site types to predict what types of information a customer or individual is more likely to discover on their own, allowing brands to tailor their communication strategies to take advantage of where conversation already occurs.

    Note: Knowing where conversations already resides allows you to skip the often resource-intensive step of building your own portals or communities in the hopes that someone shows up.
  • Site Type discussion (Order: HubGroup/C.H. Robinson/J.B. Hunt/Scheider National/Union Pacific)

    By examining where information resides, we can discover how well a brand is broadcasting, and whether they control their message.
    We can also use site types to predict what types of information a customer or individual is more likely to discover on their own, allowing brands to tailor their communication strategies to take advantage of where conversation already occurs.

    Note: Knowing where conversations already resides allows you to skip the often resource-intensive step of building your own portals or communities in the hopes that someone shows up.
  • Site Type discussion (Order: HubGroup/C.H. Robinson/J.B. Hunt/Scheider National/Union Pacific)

    By examining where information resides, we can discover how well a brand is broadcasting, and whether they control their message.
    We can also use site types to predict what types of information a customer or individual is more likely to discover on their own, allowing brands to tailor their communication strategies to take advantage of where conversation already occurs.

    Note: Knowing where conversations already resides allows you to skip the often resource-intensive step of building your own portals or communities in the hopes that someone shows up.
  • Note the influence of corporate and reference communication on these charts (financials, negative language required to report, etc)
  • Transition from Union Pacific to Schneider to JB Hunt to CH Robinson and end on Hub Group (hand-transition between each one).

    By breaking down the language around each brand, we can discover what terms both the brands themselves are broadcasting, as well as the terms customers are likely to use.
  • Transition from Union Pacific to Schneider to JB Hunt to CH Robinson and end on Hub Group (hand-transition between each one).

    By breaking down the language around each brand, we can discover what terms both the brands themselves are broadcasting, as well as the terms customers are likely to use.
  • Transition from Union Pacific to Schneider to JB Hunt to CH Robinson and end on Hub Group (hand-transition between each one).

    By breaking down the language around each brand, we can discover what terms both the brands themselves are broadcasting, as well as the terms customers are likely to use.
  • Transition from Union Pacific to Schneider to JB Hunt to CH Robinson and end on Hub Group (hand-transition between each one).

    By breaking down the language around each brand, we can discover what terms both the brands themselves are broadcasting, as well as the terms customers are likely to use.
  • Transition from Union Pacific to Schneider to JB Hunt to CH Robinson and end on Hub Group (hand-transition between each one).

    By breaking down the language around each brand, we can discover what terms both the brands themselves are broadcasting, as well as the terms customers are likely to use.
  • By rendering the pages returned for brands into a 3-dimensional map, we can not only visualize influence, but we can understand how information about the brand clusters online.

    Hub Group’s communication unable to out-influence the far, far more prolific financial information being broadcast.
  • While Hub Group dominates discussion in sheer volume, in truth the message being broadcast consists of nothing but corporate communication and financial material containing little to no information around their products and services.
  • Monitoring B2B: A Different Approach to Social Media

    1. 1. Monitoring B2B: A Different Approach to Social Media Presented by Aaron Weber, Data & Analytics Manager
    2. 2. Why Social Media Matters: • An average of 900,000 blog posts a day • There are over 3.4 million English- language Wikipedia entries today • 4-6 Million tweets an hour on average • Over 30 Billion pieces of content (videos, notes, status updates, pages) shared on Facebook in a month • Google has over 1 trillion unique urls in its index
    3. 3. Not Monitoring Social Media? What are you missing? • Unfiltered feedback from potential customers via product information and reviews • Untapped communities who are passionate on your subject or service • Current and potential brand evangelists • Vital information about how your brand is perceived • Competitive business intelligence
    4. 4. Help Your Business With:
    5. 5. B2C Online: Why it Works • Adult consumers turning more and more to the Internet as a primary source of information about products and services they are interested in • Culture encourages and fosters sharing of opinions and points of view • Barrier-less communities mean more people can connect around shared passions • Consumers have come to expect engagement from brands and brand agents
    6. 6. B2B: A Different Set of Challenges • Business privacy issues may prevent potential customers from identifying themselves. • Specialized industries often mean communities are smaller and more difficult to discover. • Regulatory issues can make brands hesitant to engage consumers directly. • The discussions around B2B concerns are often anchored in language that is difficult to sift through.
    7. 7. Solving the Challenge Requires: • A monitoring solution that can measure the relevancy and influence of a topic, not just an author • Specialization in understanding the language of B2B, and how to sift content from noise • Control over how much or how little information you receive in order to tailor resource-aware strategies • Charting and visualization tools that render disparate data sets into actionable intelligence
    8. 8. What Data Matters? • Semantic Results: Are you and customers speaking the same language? • Sentiment: Is the language around your topic positive, negative, or neutral? Does that sentiment come from you? Or from your audience? • Volume/Frequency • Where does it live?
    9. 9. Case Study: 3PL Brands Arends, Inc. asked us to look at discussion around key players in the shipping and logistics space: Hub Group Union Pacific C.H. Robinson J.B. Hunt Schneider National • Where does their information live? • What is the sentiment around each brand? • What is the language being broadcast? • Do they control their message?
    10. 10. Where Do They Live? Examine where information resides. Discover how effectively a brand is broadcasting. Does the brand control their message? Use site types to predict what types of information a customer or prospect is more likely to discover on their own. Tailor communication strategies to target places where conversation already occurs. C.H. Robinson
    11. 11. Where Do They Live? Examine where information resides. Discover how effectively a brand is broadcasting. Does the brand control their message? Use site types to predict what types of information a customer or prospect is more likely to discover on their own. Tailor communication strategies to target places where conversation already occurs. J.B. Hunt
    12. 12. Where Do They Live? Examine where information resides. Discover how effectively a brand is broadcasting. Does the brand control their message? Use site types to predict what types of information a customer or prospect is more likely to discover on their own. Tailor communication strategies to target places where conversation already occurs. Schneider National
    13. 13. Where Do They Live? Examine where information resides. Discover how effectively a brand is broadcasting. Does the brand control their message? Use site types to predict what types of information a customer or prospect is more likely to discover on their own. Tailor communication strategies to target places where conversation already occurs. Union Pacific
    14. 14. Where Do They Live? Examine where information resides. Discover how effectively a brand is broadcasting. Does the brand control their message? Use site types to predict what types of information a customer or prospect is more likely to discover on their own. This allows companies to tailor communication strategies to target places where conversation already occurs. Hub Group
    15. 15. Understanding Sentiment Compare the sentiment around each brand. Understand how information may influence customers and how the brand is perceived.
    16. 16. Semantic Analysis: Break down the language around each brand. Discover what terms the brands are broadcasting and the terms customers are likely to use.
    17. 17. Semantic Analysis: Break down the language around each brand. Discover what terms the brands are broadcasting and the terms customers are likely to use.
    18. 18. Semantic Analysis: Break down the language around each brand. Discover what terms the brands are broadcasting and the terms customers are likely to use.
    19. 19. Semantic Analysis: Break down the language around each brand. Discover what terms the brands are broadcasting and the terms customers are likely to use.
    20. 20. Semantic Analysis: Break down the language around each brand. Discover what terms the brands are broadcasting and the terms customers are likely to use.
    21. 21. Visualization Render brand pages into a 3D map. • Visualize influence • Understand brand information clusters online
    22. 22. What we learned: Hub Group dominates discussion in sheer volume, but the message being broadcast consists of nothing but corporate communication and financial material. It contains little to no information around Hub Group products and services. Opportunity: Re-tool Hub Group’s communication resources to focus on useful information for clients, not just investors.
    23. 23. In Summary: As more and more customers live online, understanding your own brand’s share of voice is key to developing and growing successful • Marketing initiatives • New business development • Customer interactions Social Media Monitoring should supplement and support your traditional data sets, not replace them. Integrating Social Media into your business plan (rather than monitoring as an afterthought) ensures that your efforts support your overall strategy, not just a tactic.
    24. 24. Thank you from For more information, please visit spiral16.com or email contact@spiral16.com Special thanks to the organizers of Social Tech 2010, Arends, Inc., and Hub Group for support and permissions.

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