Nanotechnology In Finnish Industry 2006

2,462 views

Published on

The number of Finnish companies active in
nanotechnology increased by 125% in 2004-2006, from 61 to 134. This increase took place across all sectors and company sizes. 45 companies had commercial products based on nanotechnology.

Published in: Technology
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,462
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
43
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
17
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Nanotechnology In Finnish Industry 2006

  1. 1. FinNano Nanotechnology in Finnish Industry 2006 Survey Results Pekka Koponen, Laura Juvonen, Tom Crawley Spinverse Consulting
  2. 2. Summary FinNano The number of Finnish companies active in nanotechnology has increased by 125% in two years, from 61 to 134 This increase has been across all sectors and company sizes 45 companies now have commercial products based on nanotechnology
  3. 3. Agenda FinNano Methodology Developments since 2004 Sector and technology overviews Commercial products Other key findings Conclusion
  4. 4. Survey received a large number of responses FinNano 2006 survey recieved 93 complete responses plus 9 partial responses – 10 companies reported ’no plans’ Response rate of 40,3% (44,2% partial) Number of responses increased by 36% from 2004 Number of Companies/Respondents 250 Number of Companies 200 150 100 50 0 2004 2006 Companies Identified Responses Note: The response rate from 2004 took into account both e- mail and interview responses, hence the higher proportional response rate
  5. 5. Survey results were added to Tekes data, and own knowledge FinNano 83 Companies responded to the survey, indicating that they had at least vision work in nanotechnology 35 Companies are involved in the FinNano program but did not respond to the survey 16 Companies were found to be active during the 2004 survey, and are still active now 134 TOTAL
  6. 6. The number of companies involved in nanotechnology has increased from 61 to 134 FinNano 160 140 120 100 80 60 40 20 0 2004 2006 Commercial Product Product Development Research Vision
  7. 7. The increase has been seen across every industry and company size FinNano 160 160 140 140 120 120 100 100 80 80 60 60 40 40 20 20 0 0 2004 2006 2004 2006 Electronics Chemicals and Materials Large Medium Life Sciences Forest Products Small Micro Other Instruments and Tools
  8. 8. The increase is also seen at every stage of development FinNano Vision Research Product Commercial TOTAL Development Product Chemicals 1 2 2 10 5 9 10 14 18 35 and Materials Electronics 3 4 2 9 6 6 12 14 24 33 Forest 0 0 3 6 3 4 1 3 7 13 Products Life Sciences 2 5 3 14 1 3 2 2 8 24 Instruments 0 1 1 1 0 2 0 9 1 13 and Tools Other 0 2 1 8 1 3 1 3 3 16 Total 6 14 12 48 16 27 26 45 61 134 2004 2006
  9. 9. Nanotechnology companies are distributed throughout Finland FinNano Region 2006 2004 Change 1. Uusimaa 61 31 30 2. Varsinais-Suomi 13 6 7 3. Satakunta 2 1 1 4. Häme 8 3 5 5. Pirkanmaa 23 9 14 6. Kaakkois-Suomi 4 1 3 7. Etelä-Savo 2 1 1 8. Pohjois-Savo 1 0 1 9. Pohjois-Karjala 3 2 1 10. Keski-Suomi 3 1 2 11. Etelä-Pohjanmaa 1 0 1 12. Pohjanmaa 2 1 1 13. Pohjois-Pohjanmaa 8 5 3 14. Kainuu 1 0 1 Other 2 0 2 134 61 73
  10. 10. Chemicals and Materials Technology Pipeline FinNano Research Product Development Commercial Coatings •Improved catalyst Gas catalyst •Functional paints and coatings materials materials (Ecocat) •Hybrid coatings Anti-fingerprint room Nanoactive porous •Colour coated sheet metal products •plastic film surfaces temperature curing structures (Omya) •Nanocomposite UV-TiO2 Materials coatings nanoparticle •catalytic materials with nanoscale active •Nanopowder retention systems sites synthesis, functional (Kemira) •building materials coatings Self cleaning •glass colouring technology •carbon based nanomaterials •Metal-based facades •Nanocomposites in packaging materials nanoparticles (<100 (UV-Chemicals) •Special compounds;TPEs and silicone nm) Ceramic powders for •coil coated sheet thermal spraying Nanoparticles metals (Millidyne) •Nanoscale UV-TiO2 products for nano cobalt oxide cosmetics, paints and photocatalytics. •Nanoparticle binder and sizing products Conducting •Ceramic powders polymers (Panipol) •Metal-based nanoparticles Nanocomposites •Nano-sized particles added to tooling (Amroy) materials, nano-particle alloying of copper
  11. 11. Product Pipeline for electronics FinNano Research Product Development Commercial Sensors •Nanoimprint Semiconductor • Gas sensors for chemical and biological probes materials materials, display •Production of sensors by •Nanoimprint- application nanolithography based quantum materials Processes dot lasers (Braggone) •Nanoimprint techniques •Diffractive optics, Sensors •ALD for new applications plastic material, (VTI, Environics, •Photomasks •Coatings in high-temperature ovens coatings Dekati) •Surface treatments •Conductive, Lasers •Laser ablation and coating solutions transparent thin (Coherent, Lasers and Optics films for displays Modulight) •Optics/quantum-mechanical •Particle Sensors Fotomasks semiconductor lasers (Mikcell) •quantum-dot lasers •optical nanostuctures Optics (Modine, Components Heptagon) •carbon nanobud based electronics components Fibres •Battery technology (Liekki) •RF integration in cell phones
  12. 12. Forest Products Technology Pipeline FinNano Research Product Development Commercial Packaging •More complex Filter material •food freshness indicators filtration products (Ahlstrom) •barrier materials •chemicals for use O2 and H2S •active packaging materials in performance indicators materials (UPM Raflatac) New Materials •advanced paper •wood based composites products, Coatings •Composite applications, changes to the (Pikoteknik) lubrication functional properties of Papers paper •paper and surface chemistry •Improvements to paper- making process •Controlling functional properties of paper •filtration and chemical dosing
  13. 13. Life Sciences Technology Pipeline FinNano Research Product Development Commercial Diagnostics •Drug products Diagnostic tools •Nanoparticles in multitester / based on containing invitro diagnostics nanoparticles nanoparticles •miniaturisation of diagnostics, Controlled (Orion Diagnostica, improvements in analytical nanotopography of AniBiotech) sensitivity, multiplexing possibilities thin films •DNA based diagnostic applications •coatings, raw •Improved reagents, sensors materials applications Treatments •Bioabsorbable •Nanoparticulate drug carriers implants •Drug nanoparticles, primarily for •Microencapsulation inhalation administration •Controlled nanotopography of tissue adhering thin films Techniques •Nanoencapsulation
  14. 14. Instruments & Tools Technology Pipeline FinNano Research Product Development Commercial •Laserinterferometric •Bioanalytical •Langmuir- and measurement and positioning Assays Langmuir- •Realtime monitoring of •Infrared Blodgett troughs nanoscale self-assembly Spectrometers (KSV Instruments, process •Materials Kibron) •Thin films and coatings based processing with •Surface on ALD lasers Chemistry •Nanoparticle based coatings •Functional glass Instrumentation and material modifications and ceramics (KSV Instruments) •ALD Reactors (Beneq, Picosun, Planar) •nHALO equipment (Beneq Oy)
  15. 15. The Finnish nanotechnology landscape: FinNano Electronics Chemicals and Forest Life Sciences Materials Products Instruments and Tools
  16. 16. HybtoniteTM Nanocomposite material improves hockey sticks, skis and FinNano Improved stiffness and strength of composite materials Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes incorporated into a fibre matrix as a resin Value chain – from Innovation originated from Jyväskylä University Bayer supplied nanotubes incorporated in resin by Amroy Resin then sold to manufacturers, such as Montreal Hockey, Peltonen Skis, Karhu etc. Image Source: montrealhockey.com
  17. 17. Amer Sports; performance skis, tennis rackets with strong branding FinNano Carbon fibre tennis rackets and alpine skis with improved strength, stability and power Technical Solution Voids occur between carbon fibres Voids are filled with nanoscopic silicon dioxide crystals Improves stability of entire matrix
  18. 18. nGlass decorative tiles FinNano Exceptionally attractive glass tiles Technical Solution Topmost layer of glass is coloured Glass surface is heated and then coated with nanoscale particles Different colours achieved by altering composition and distribution of particles Technology can be intregrated into glass manufacturer’s production line Source: nGLASS
  19. 19. Startex Ski wax – secret behins Finnish success in Sapporo World Championships FinNano Super-hydrophobic coating enables superior sliding for skis Increases cross-country skier speed 5-10 seconds per 5 km Project done in co-operation between Startex, VTT State Research Center of Finland, ABR Innova and supported by Image Source: startex.fi Tekes funding
  20. 20. Atomic Layer Deposition FinNano Ability to apply ultra-thin films to substrates (with complex features) Technology Alternating pulses of reactants Self-limiting Business Model Production of equipment which can then be used in industrial processes Image Source: Beneq
  21. 21. Increases in research funding mean that time to market for research is from 2-4 years FinNano Projected Increase in Time to Market Research Budget Chemicals and 83% 2,3 years Materials Forest Products 75% 2,7 years Electronics 114% 3,4 years Life Sciences 43% 3,7 years
  22. 22. The key challenge is still achieving reliable mass production FinNano What have you found to be the main challenges when commercialising nanotechnology? Others (please specify) Challenges in identifying commercial applications during collaboration with universities Lack of Standards Lack of Customer/Consumer Acceptance Difficulties in Achieving Reliable Mass Production Shortages of Funding 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 Number of respondents naming this as a factor
  23. 23. Almost every firm works with research partners FinNano 44 respondents work with partners ”to develop core technologies” Only one firm conducts nanotechnology research entirely in house Respondents were asked ”What is the relative importance of the following types of partner?” Not Very Important Important 1 2 3 4 N/a Universities in Finland 8 13 20 30 0 Universities Abroad 15 23 18 5 4 Public Research Centers 13 16 21 18 2 Horizontal Collab. 28 18 10 3 6 Vertical Collab. 5 11 18 35 2
  24. 24. IP, Idenfifying Commercial Opportunities are main challenges in working with Universities FinNano We asked ”Have any of the following issues made it more difficult to generate commercially viable results when working with universities?” Not Very Important Important 1 2 3 4 N/a Basic Orientation of 15 25 17 5 6 Research Challenges in Identifying 17 14 18 5 6 Commercial Opportunities Communication Problems 27 21 10 3 7 Issues related to Ownership 14 15 18 15 7 of Intellectual Property Underdevelopment of 10 22 20 11 6 Production Technologies Insufficient Knowledge of 17 15 17 15 5 Business or Markets
  25. 25. Research is financed using own funding and Tekes support FinNano We asked ” What has been the relative importance of the following sources of funding for your research activities? Not Very Important Important 1 2 3 4 N/a Own Funding 4 11 16 43 0 Tekes 6 8 19 38 1 Academy of Finland 41 3 5 2 12 Public/Private 40 4 6 3 11 Foundations European Union 32 12 7 5 8 Other foreign public 39 3 7 1 12 sources Other Firms 29 10 10 7 7
  26. 26. Some evidence of a skills shortage in nanotechnology FinNano "Have you found it to be easy or difficult to recruit skilled people in areas connected to nanotechnology?" 30 Number of Responses 25 20 15 10 5 0 Very Easy Very Difficult 44% of respondents found recruitment to be ’difficult’ or ’very difficult’ Next step is to look at whether particular sectors are affected, and which skills are most in demand
  27. 27. Approximately half of the respondents had participated in FinNano FinNano 45 had participated in the FinNano program, 42 had not Those that had participated had done so by: Attending events (27 respondents) Participating in FinNano funded projects (28) The level of satisfaction with the FinNano project, among those that had participated, was generally good: How succesful do you think that the Tekes FinNano program has been in meeting its objectives? Completely Successful Successful Neutral Unsuccessful Completely Unsuccessful 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 Number of respondents choosing this as an option
  28. 28. Summary FinNano Number of active Finnish companies in nanotechnology has more than doubled since Tekes FinNano-program started. 45 companies have commercial products or processes. Most industries have a deep pipeline of research, to be realised in 2-4 years. Like with most emerging technologies, delays in commercialization can be expected. Reliable mass production is one of the key challenges.

×