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Modeling Qualitative
Data
Clay Spinuzzi,
clay.spinuzzi@utexas.edu
What we’ll do
Discuss principles of systematically
analyzing qualitative data
Discuss types of models for
systematically a...
Systematically analyzing
qualitative data
“Data is not the
plural of
anecdote”
Qualitative data should...
relate to a research question or
concern
relate to each ot...
Ways to analyze qualitative data
Triangulating
Coding
Memoing
Modeling
Using models to explore
relationships
Three kinds of
models
(Depending on how you count
them)
network: for nonsequential
relationships
flow: for sequential rela...
Models in qualitative research...
Models: visual representations that allow you to abstract
relations at each level and se...
Network
diagrams
The point: Nonsequential
relationships
The payoff: You can see how
different things relate along
specific...
Flow diagrams
The point: Sequential relationships.
The payoff: You can see sequences
and decision points.
Examples from “C...
Matrixes (tables)
The point: Ordered comparisons
The payoff: You can compare things
(in rows) using the same criteria
or c...
Other sorts of
models?
Think in terms of other relationships
you could explore in your qualitative
data:
Heat maps?
Word c...
Interrelating models
Interrelating
models
Done well, this can provide
further insights
Each model lets you visualize and
test a relationship.
C...
Applying models to your
projects
Please introduce
yourselves and
your projects
Your name
Your project (in a sentence)
Your research question/concern
The ki...
As we look at
each project...
We’ll collectively answer these
questions.
What is the research
question/concern? What
relat...
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Workshop: modeling qualitative data

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"Data is not the plural of anecdote!" If you've heard this, you're probably a qualitative researcher, and you've been wondering how to inject more rigor into your methodology. This workshop, presented at Syracuse University and at ATTW 2016, discusses the principles of modeling qualitative data. It covers three main types of models and variations, discussing what they're for and how they can be used to more rigorously compare, understand, and interpret your data.

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Workshop: modeling qualitative data

  1. 1. Modeling Qualitative Data Clay Spinuzzi, clay.spinuzzi@utexas.edu
  2. 2. What we’ll do Discuss principles of systematically analyzing qualitative data Discuss types of models for systematically analyzing data Discuss how to interrelate these models Apply principles to your own data Before discussing your projects...
  3. 3. Systematically analyzing qualitative data
  4. 4. “Data is not the plural of anecdote” Qualitative data should... relate to a research question or concern relate to each other help us to draw testable inferences provide evidence for claims
  5. 5. Ways to analyze qualitative data Triangulating Coding Memoing Modeling
  6. 6. Using models to explore relationships
  7. 7. Three kinds of models (Depending on how you count them) network: for nonsequential relationships flow: for sequential relationships matrix: for ordered comparisons
  8. 8. Models in qualitative research... Models: visual representations that allow you to abstract relations at each level and see patterns. Not always used But: useful for visualizing and exploring specific types of relationships in the data Specifically, useful for spotting, testing, verifying, and elaborating patterns in the data And consequently, for developing further hypotheses
  9. 9. Network diagrams The point: Nonsequential relationships The payoff: You can see how different things relate along specific lines (e.g., where they are coordinated, where they contact each other) Examples from “Chains and Ecologies”: Genre Ecology Models (Resource Maps)
  10. 10. Flow diagrams The point: Sequential relationships. The payoff: You can see sequences and decision points. Examples from “Chains and Ecologies”: Communication Event Models (Handoff Chains)
  11. 11. Matrixes (tables) The point: Ordered comparisons The payoff: You can compare things (in rows) using the same criteria or characteristics (columns) Examples from “Chains and ecologies”: STG Tables (Triangulation Tables) Prepare for report Write report Deliver report Elizair previous month’s report, highlighting and annotations on previous month’s report, emails with client, spreadsheet of projects, IMs and talks with Craig, WikiAnswers emaiils from customer, BRILLIANCE, report template, notes, email to Sonia Final draft of report, client presentation, PowerPoint slides Craig previous month’s report, highlighting and annotations on previous month’s report, emails with client, keyword logs, text file listing projects, IMs and talks with Dani Emails from customer, BRILLIANCE, report template, notes, email to Sonia Final draft of report, client presentation, PowerPoint slides Dani previous month’s report, highlighting and annotations on previous month’s report, emails with client, notebook listing projects, IMs and talks with Craig Emails from customer, BRILLIANCE, report template, notes, email to Sonia Final draft of report, client presentation, PowerPoint slides Sonia Email from Elizair, emails with customer, talk with Elizair Final draft of report, Cover email to client, client presentation, PowerPoint slides
  12. 12. Other sorts of models? Think in terms of other relationships you could explore in your qualitative data: Heat maps? Word clouds? Traffic flow? Combinations of other models?
  13. 13. Interrelating models
  14. 14. Interrelating models Done well, this can provide further insights Each model lets you visualize and test a relationship. Can you interrelate the insights from different models? (See “Chains and Ecologies”)
  15. 15. Applying models to your projects
  16. 16. Please introduce yourselves and your projects Your name Your project (in a sentence) Your research question/concern The kind of data you’re collecting The data you brought today In a few sentences...
  17. 17. As we look at each project... We’ll collectively answer these questions. What is the research question/concern? What relationships should we explore to get to it? What relationships might we explore with network diagrams, flow diagrams, and/or matrixes? Are there relationships we can’t model with them? How might we model these? What actionable next steps should the researcher take?

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