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Citing
MAGAZINES &
JOURNALS
How to Read a
PERIODICAL Source
Citation
Once you’ve identified your article as a
MAGAZINE or JOURNAL,
where do you go from there?
Citing a source is like putting together
a jigsaw puzzle – each piece has to
come together just so in order for the
puzzle...
Locate your citation information at the end of your article.
Look for “MLA” or “Works Cited” or “How to Cite.”
Example Art...
Example Article
Some articles will have MLA citation only, APA
citation only, or BOTH for you to look at as
you are adding your informatio...
Now let’s put the pieces together …
AUTHOR(S) OF ARTICLE
(hint – it is okay if you do
not have an author)
TITLE OF ARTICLE
(hint – this title often appears
in “quotation marks” )
PAGE NUMBERS
(hint – this is the page # as it
appeared in the actual
magazine or journal)
NAME OF MAGAZINE
OR JOURNAL
(hint – this title is usually italicized)
VOLUME & ISSUE
hint – this information is often
written like the following –
6(12)
6 = Volume
(12) = Issue
PUBLICATION DATE
(hint – this is the day the
magazine/journal was published,
NOT the day you went online)
RETRIEVAL INFORMATION
(pick ONLY the ONE that applies to your article)
1. DOI - http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0002-9432.76.4.4...
Now you’re ready to create your
works cited entry in your
working bibliography in
NoodleTools.
See the Library
for Help.
All Images Provided byBy S. Penttila,
The John Cooper School
MS Librarian
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Read a periodical source citation

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Read a periodical source citation

  1. 1. Citing MAGAZINES & JOURNALS How to Read a PERIODICAL Source Citation
  2. 2. Once you’ve identified your article as a MAGAZINE or JOURNAL, where do you go from there?
  3. 3. Citing a source is like putting together a jigsaw puzzle – each piece has to come together just so in order for the puzzle to make the big picture.
  4. 4. Locate your citation information at the end of your article. Look for “MLA” or “Works Cited” or “How to Cite.” Example Article
  5. 5. Example Article
  6. 6. Some articles will have MLA citation only, APA citation only, or BOTH for you to look at as you are adding your information to your bibliography chart or NoodleTools. It can also be helpful to look at the beginning of the article for more details.
  7. 7. Now let’s put the pieces together …
  8. 8. AUTHOR(S) OF ARTICLE (hint – it is okay if you do not have an author)
  9. 9. TITLE OF ARTICLE (hint – this title often appears in “quotation marks” )
  10. 10. PAGE NUMBERS (hint – this is the page # as it appeared in the actual magazine or journal)
  11. 11. NAME OF MAGAZINE OR JOURNAL (hint – this title is usually italicized)
  12. 12. VOLUME & ISSUE hint – this information is often written like the following – 6(12) 6 = Volume (12) = Issue
  13. 13. PUBLICATION DATE (hint – this is the day the magazine/journal was published, NOT the day you went online)
  14. 14. RETRIEVAL INFORMATION (pick ONLY the ONE that applies to your article) 1. DOI - http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0002-9432.76.4.482 OR 2. DATABASE NAME + ACCESSION/DOCUMENT # OR 3. URL to the .COM
  15. 15. Now you’re ready to create your works cited entry in your working bibliography in NoodleTools.
  16. 16. See the Library for Help. All Images Provided byBy S. Penttila, The John Cooper School MS Librarian

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