2013 Chamber ADVANCE

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Spartanburg Area Chamber of Commerce - 2013 ADVANCE

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  • Downtown: significant progress over past decade; highlight existing and new corporate headquarters, higher education institutions.
  • Christopher Peterson – a University of Michigan psychology professor and Martin Seligman - a psychology professor at the University of Pennsylvania Book- Character Strengths and Virtues: A Handbook and Classification, a three and a half pound, 800-page work. Angela Duckworth, a Ph.D. candidate at Penn, who had a different view of school reform. “The problem, I think, is not only the schools, but also the students themselves. Here’s why: learning is hard. True, learning is fun, exhilarating and gratifying but it is also often daunting, exhausting and sometimes discouraging….To help chronically low performing but intelligent students , educators and parents must first recognize that character is at least as important as intellect.”She found in her research that self-control can be more reliable as a predictor of students’ success than their I.Q.s. She discovered, that while self-control seemed a critical ingredient to basic achievement, frequently it was not as relevant for those outstanding achievers who had a passion and unrelenting dedication, regardless of obstacles or time invested in achieving their goal. She called this trait “grit.” With the assistance of Peterson, the full list of 24 character strengths was narrowed to a final list of seven: zest, grit, self-control, social intelligence, gratitude, optimism and curiosity.
  • 2013 Chamber ADVANCE

    1. 1. 2013 ADVANCE “SPARTANBURG – ENTERPRISE HUB” Presented by
    2. 2. DR. COLLEEN KEITH Spartanburg Methodist College
    3. 3. Mike Trammell
    4. 4. Sue Schneider Spartanburg Water
    5. 5. Context and Indicators 2013 ADVANCE “SPARTANBURG – ENTERPRISE HUB”
    6. 6. Over $10 million in new investment per week
    7. 7. BUILDING PERMITS In the Upstate up 22% over last year •Greenville – up 3.1% •Anderson – up 41% •Spartanburg – up 57% Driven by job creation and strong demand Source – The Market Edge
    8. 8. Manufacturing 2012 - 2013 Manufacturing Employment SC - 264,000 Greenville – 23,800 Spartanburg – 14,900 North Charleston – 11,800 Spartanburg is second in the State + 1% -½% +1.4% +1.7%
    9. 9. US REAL GMP GROWTH RATES •Spartanburg 30th of 363 metros •Columbia - 59th •Greenville/Mauldin/Easley - 80th •Myrtle Beach - 94th •Sumter - 101st •Raleigh - 105th •Charleston/N. Charleston/Summerville - 134th •Florence - 136th Source: Global Insight
    10. 10. Site Selection Award Top Ten Best Economic Development Groups EFG
    11. 11. Trade & Industry Award Corporate Investment and Community Impact Awards (CiCi) Top Ten - EFG
    12. 12. Project Activity New vs. Existing, 2011 - 2013 2012 (109) 10% 2013 (97) 18% 82% New 90% 90% Expansion s 10% New 82% Expansions 18% 2011 (99) 12% New 88% 88% Expansions 12% 16
    13. 13. 2013 Commitments 24 Projects Totaling $112,587,650 and 1,211 New Jobs Amazon Contec Trimite Laserflex Jeffrey Rader Sally Beauty Divatex AL Solutions Cooper Standard Integrity Tool, LLC Smooth-Bor Plastics Vulcan Materials Lindoerfer Steiner Heiche US Surface Technology Edgewater Automation Copac Lear Detroit Forming Inc. Syncreon/BMW Valley Grinding AVI American Credit Acceptance FedEx International Recycling Group 10 New Companies, 14 Expansions
    14. 14. COLLABORATION
    15. 15. Going Forward: High Priority in Future Workforce Updated Strategic Plan Quality of Place
    16. 16. Tammy Devine – QS/1 Jennifer Evins – Arts Partnership Sue Schneider – Spartanburg Water Katherine O’Neill - County Administrator
    17. 17. Quality of Place  Definition What have we done? Where do we go from here?
    18. 18. 3 Important Qualities  Quality of Life Quality of Message Quality of Place
    19. 19. Quality of Life  Your personal satisfaction with the physical and cultural conditions under which you live. The general sense of well being of individuals and society.
    20. 20. Quality of Message  What we say and what others say about our place.
    21. 21. Quality of Place  The unique set of characteristics that defines a place and what makes it special.
    22. 22. Quality of Place   QUALITY OF PLACE IN A CHANGING WORLD “You look at the cities in the 21st century that are going to be successful, they are doing things that make it a quality place to live. We have to have things that say ‘I want to stay here, I want to live here. Steve Ahlenius McAllen Chamber of Commerce
    23. 23. Quality of Place  How is Quality of Place and Quality of Life different? The physical characteristics of a community – the way it is planned, designed, developed and maintained – that affect the quality of life of people living and working in it, and those visiting it, both now and into the future.
    24. 24. Quality of Place Factors
    25. 25. Quality of Place  Characteristics Cosmopolitan Social Restaurants Openness Entertainment Physical Beautyenvironment Jobs Intentional built environment Land Use Standards Expectations
    26. 26. Quality of Place  What do we have?
    27. 27. 0.75 mile radius From the Chapman Center  1.00 mile radius From the Chapman Center
    28. 28. Inventory of Cultural Assets           34 Indoor Live Performance venues 15 Outdoor Performance venues and amphitheaters 43 Gallery and Exhibit Spaces 78 Public Art Sculptures 26 Public Landscape Fountains 7 Museums 21 Historic sites 156 Studios and Workshops 32 Green spaces & Arboretums  1872 Events and Festivals that are open to the public
    29. 29. Quality of Place  What is missing?
    30. 30. Quality of Place  How can we learn from others? Comparisons to Peer Communities Comparisons to Aspirational Communities
    31. 31. Quality of Place  Potential Communities for Comparison Bend, OR Durham, NC Winston-Salem, NC Santé Fe, NM Burlington, VT Provo, UT Fayetteville, AR Duluth, MN
    32. 32. Bend, OR  Winston-Salem, NC Fayetteville, AR
    33. 33. Quality of Place  What’s there – combination of built and natural Who’s there – diverse people and goals What’s going on – vibrancy and experiences
    34. 34. Quality of Place  Examples that make a difference
    35. 35. Indigo Hall Spartanburg, SC
    36. 36. Indigo Hall - today Spartanburg, SC
    37. 37. New Design for old building
    38. 38. Quality of Place  Action Plan Create an awareness for quality of place. Provide knowledge, tools, guidance, and support on quality of place. Encourage public and community engagement for quality of place. Implement quality of place principles and objectives to utilize in our community. Who wants to be part of this committee?
    39. 39. Questions 
    40. 40. ECONOMIC VISION Todd Horne – Clayton Construction Ed Memmott – City of Spartanburg
    41. 41. Downtown Spartanburg — Building the City from the inside out Todd Horne, Clayton Construction Ed Memmott, City Manager
    42. 42. What we heard a year ago….. 1) 2) 3) 4) 5) 6) 7) 8) 9) 10) 11) 12) 13) 14) 15) Welcoming Eager to improve Complacent Sleepy Cliquish Distressed Small Town Stalled-Stagnant Evolving Traditional Splintered Blue Collar Tired Bruised Evolving CityofSpartanburg.com
    43. 43. What we heard a year ago….. 1) 2) 3) 4) 5) 6) 7) 8) 9) 10) 11) 12) 13) 14) 15) Progressive- Forward thinking Multi-generational Vibrant Enthusiastic Young Proud Goal Oriented Focused Fresh Cohesive-inclusive White Collar Energized Drive towards progress Bold Cool CityofSpartanburg.com
    44. 44. What are we looking to accomplish? To determine the most productive economic uses for the central city of Spartanburg and develop a strategy to grow them. Build on previous and current work of the City, County, Chamber of Commerce, Economic Futures Group, business leaders and stakeholders. We recognize that economic development in general, and business retention, expansion, and attraction in particular, are vital to the economic growth of downtown Spartanburg. We believe that by strategically strengthening our Downtown, creating white collar jobs, and generating economic development, Spartanburg can develop into the city that businesses come to thrive in the Upstate.
    45. 45. CityofSpartanburg.com
    46. 46. Why is Downtown important? • More people work within a 1-mile radius of Morgan Square than work at BMW, Michelin, Milliken, Spartanburg Steel, RR Donnelley, Kohler and Tietex … COMBINED. • Jobs per acre within 1 mile of Morgan Square = 6.7 • Jobs per acre in the rest of the county = 0.2 • Total assessed valuation of taxable properties per acre • • • City: $10,384.20 Rest of county $1,647.73. New Downtown jobs = high ROI CityofSpartanburg.com
    47. 47. Long-term transformation • Since 2002: • Six new corporate office buildings (HWSC, QS1, Advance America, One Morgan Square, TD Bank Building, SCBT Building) • More than 200 new or renovated residential units • City investment of $25 million in three new garages (Magnolia, Dunbar, St. John) to support development • Dozens of examples of City incentives and tax credits for new businesses and renovations downtown • 2003: Marriott Hotel & Conference Center opens with multimillion dollar City support • 2006: Morgan Square renovation ($2.5 million) CityofSpartanburg.com
    48. 48. Long-term transformation • 2009: Adopted Urban Code/Downtown Master Plan • 2010: USC Upstate George Dean Johnson Jr. School of Business opens (City supported development with infrastructure improvements and construction of St. John Street Parking Garage) • 2011: VCOM opens to first class of students • 2012: West Main Streetscape Improvement Project ($325,000) • 2013: Spartanburg Community College Downtown Campus • 2013: Council approves eight downtown streetscaping/pedestrian/bicycle connectivity projects ($2.3 million) CityofSpartanburg.com
    49. 49. 2013: Good year for downtown Nearly 50 new opened/reopened, or announced business, residential, infrastructure or special event projects Downtown. (That‘s almost one new thing Downtown every week!) CityofSpartanburg.com
    50. 50. 2013 Downtown Developments OPENINGS 1. Wild Ace 2. The Back Porch 3. The Growler Haus 4. The Speakeasy 5. The Green Canary 6. Herb & Renewal 7. The Culinary Hub 8. Olive & Then Some 9. Dottie‘s Toffee 10. The Local Hiker 11. Haute Mama 12. Writefully His 13. Pure Barre Corporate Training Center 14. Clyde‘s Fitness (reopened) 15. Delaney‘s (reopened) 16. The Upstairs Bar (reopened) 17. T3 Talent 18. Katalyst 19. The Iron Yard CityofSpartanburg.com 20. The Johnson Collection Gallery 21. SCC Downtown Campus 22. The Valet UNDERWAY 23. Renato‘s Ristorante 24. Insurance company above Renato‘s 25.St. Paul‘s Catholic Church 26. Denny‘s Test Kitchen and Café 27. Cohen‘s ANNOUNCED 28. Wall Street Multi-Use Building (4 offices and 4 residential units) 29. Motte & Sons Bootlegging RESIDENTIAL 30. Lofts at 154 (3 units) 31. Magnolia Street Lofts (27 units) 32. Above former Blood Bank (1 unit) 33. Above new Renato‘s (1 unit) 34. Schuyler Building Apartments (88 units) 35. 314 South Townhomes (16 units) INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECTS 36. Signal Light Project 37. Kennedy Street Garage Refurbishment 38. New Street Trees 39. Spring Street Stage 40. Streetscape Improvement Plan NEW SPECIAL EVENTS 41. Ferris Wheel 42. Downtown Bites 43. Sunday Art Market 44. Hub City Hog Fest 45. Rock the Denim
    51. 51. 2013 Downtown Developments The Dupre House - VCOM CityofSpartanburg.com
    52. 52. Wall Street Mixed Use — 4 units each office, residential CityofSpartanburg.com
    53. 53. Schuyler Building — 88 units Today Planned to begin leasing in Spring 2014 CityofSpartanburg.com
    54. 54. Version 2.0: Launching in January 2014! CityofSpartanburg.com
    55. 55. Balancing Demands – Limited City Resources $33 million annual operating budget 400 FTE‘s Where does the City spend taxpayers‘ money? CityofSpartanburg.com
    56. 56. City Budget CITY OF SPARTANBURG FY 2013 - 2014 ADOPTED BUDGET Non-Departmental 8% Parks, Recreations & Special Events 5% Administration 4% Information Technology Policy Legal 3% 3% 1% Human Resources 3% Finance & Administrative Services 5% Development Services 8% Public Works 18% Fire 14% CityofSpartanburg.com Police 28%
    57. 57. Working ‗under the hood‘ • Closed Arkwright Dump in 2012 at cost of $6 million • Increased funding for legacy pension by $700,000 annually • Strengthened reserve fund balance by 20% since 2009 • Made difficult choices to close T.K. Gregg Community Center and Swim Center • Restructured Public Works operations • 20% smaller workforce than 4 years ago CityofSpartanburg.com
    58. 58. Making strategic investments St. John Street Parking Garage Spartanburg Community College Barnet Park Improvements Downtown Memorial Airport Northside Initiative West Main Streetscaping CityofSpartanburg.com
    59. 59. Growing The City • Continue to focus on building corporate/institutional hub • Continue to increase residential options and total units • Continue to be creative in efforts to attract and support retail, restaurants, entertainment (Main Street Challenge, Skating on the Square, WOLI) • Continue to improve streetscaping and pedestrian infrastructure. Downtown Master Plan/Urban Code is key. CityofSpartanburg.com
    60. 60. What are additional steps? • We need your embrace of strategic regional importance of focusing energy downtown. • Our homegrown private sector entrepreneurial engines (the Johnson and J.M. Smith families of companies, among others) and our non-profit partners are doing all we could ask. We need additional players. We need a major white-collar recruitment victory. • We need a privately funded deal closing fund. • We need our economic development partners to add a well-defined white-collar/downtown program of work to their very well demonstrated prowess in manufacturing and distribution. • We need all of you to help us identify opportunities. CityofSpartanburg.com
    61. 61. Opportunities — Renaissance Park Renaissance Park Development The approximately 9 acres adjacent to the Marriott Hotel & Conference Center, The George, the Chapman Cultural Center, and Barnet Park represents an enormous opportunity for the City. The Downtown Master Plan recommends a mixed-use development highlighted by an open-air plaza. CityofSpartanburg.com
    62. 62. Opportunities — Grain District Grain District Infill Redevelopment A growing center for entertainment, nightlife and creativity, the Grain District has seen significant redevelopment in recent years (HubBub, Cribb‘s Kitchen, RJ Rockers, Hub City Books, Coffee Bar, Pocket Park, Main Street Pub). The Downtown Master Plan has identified the area as ripe for new development as well. CityofSpartanburg.com
    63. 63. Opportunities — The Northside CityofSpartanburg.com
    64. 64. Opportunities — Downtown Master Plan www.cityofspartanburg.org/planning-zoning CityofSpartanburg.com
    65. 65. Questions/Discussion 1) Does downtown matter to you and your business? 2) What do you see as the most important steps moving forward with enhancing white collar development in downtown Spartanburg? 3) 4) Would a more formal structure – a coordinating group of business leaders and downtown stakeholders - help focus efforts? How do we capitalize on the current momentum and build a ―cool‖ downtown? CityofSpartanburg.com
    66. 66. PLANNING FOR GROWTH IN THE NEW SOUTH Allen Joines Mayor, Winston-Salem, NC WS Alliance
    67. 67. THOUGHTS ON THE FUTURE OF SPARTANBURG George Dean Johnson Jr. – Chairman Johnson Development Associates
    68. 68. WORKFORCE THE PATH TO ALIGNMENT Foster Chapman – Johnson Development Joy Owens – WORC LaTokia Trigg – Ready SC
    69. 69. W.O.R.C. Workforce Opportunities Resources Council Foster Chapman – Chairperson Joy Owens – Director
    70. 70. Mission To plan, create, and manage a system which “aligns” the workplace, education, training, infor mation, and community resources to facilitate job growth and economic development.
    71. 71. WORC Advisory Board A guiding board for priorities and progress CEOs K-12 HR Medical Government Broadcasting Colleges WIB Agencies Logistics Workforce Services
    72. 72. WORC Group Stakeholders Cooper Standard Circor International Kusters Zima Corp. RR Donnelley Mack Molding Duer / Carolina Coil Timken Lear BMW QS1 BASF Wells Fargo Barnet Polymers Auriga AFL Telecom Michelin Junior Achievement TFE Logistics Amazon SRMC Spartanburg County Regional Ed. Ctr. Adult Ed. Sptbg. Truancy Court College Hub SMC SCC USC Upstate Metropolitan Studies Districts 2, 4 & 6 Clemson University Swofford RD Anderson Daniel Morgan WIB SC Works Ready SC SHRA Channel 7 & ETV Boys & Girls Club
    73. 73. Questions For Us • • • • • • How do we connect the dots? What skills are truly needed? How do we let people know about good jobs? Is there a way to facilitate career changes? How do we reach students? How much training is actually necessary?
    74. 74. Our Job • Address these and many other issues and questions • Create new systems to facilitate ―alignment‖ • Lead the way to a new era of career fulfillment • Familiarize ourselves with the existing resources and create new if necessary • Establish excellent collaboration amongst us
    75. 75. Our Steps Taken • Meet regularly, pick times and frequency • Learn about each of the group members and the programs they lead • Understand that this is a long-term process and commit to that involvement • Create the dialogue amongst us
    76. 76. What Came Next • Involvement by the members • Out of the Box thinking • Non Standard Experiments by companies and stake holder groups –Cooper Standard –Boys & Girls Clubs – 30 young ladies ages 11 & 12 spent 4 days in a STEM Project at Daniel Morgan for nontraditional training
    77. 77. What We‘ve Seen • Companies & Career Centers Toured –Standard Cooper –SC ETV –SEW Eurodrive –Swofford Career Center
    78. 78. Going Forward • Education is a must for our youth, along with training for future jobs • For many students a four-year college degree many not be the best path to a job that makes the most of their skills and talents
    79. 79. WORC • The Workforce Opportunities Resource Council is on going, developing relationships, with new companies, community leaders and allowing it‘s members to experiment with ideas that bring great outcomes for today‘s and tomorrow‘s careers.
    80. 80. Workforce….The Path to Alignment Spartanburg Chamber Advance December 3, 2013
    81. 81. SC Technical College System Primary Mechanisms for Economic and Workforce Development
    82. 82. US Workforce “Fast Facts” • US Manufacturing – 3.85M potential jobs: – 600,000 unfilled manufacturing due to skill shortages – 500,000 new manufacturing jobs – 2.75M jobs created due to manufacturing growth (multiplier= 1 manufacturing job creates 2.5 additional jobs) • US 2010-2020 – all sectors – 54+M potential jobs – 33.5M openings due to baby boomer retirements – 20.5M openings due to new job creation
    83. 83. Current Statewide Snapshot Total projects: 113 • • 61 new 52 expanding Top 5 industries as of 9/2013: • • • • • Transportation Equipment Manufacturing Rubber and Miscellaneous Plastic Products Insurance Carriers Paper and Allied Products Warehousing and Storage
    84. 84. Jobs in South Carolina High - Skilled Jobs 17% People 26% Middle -Skilled Jobs 45% People 29% Low -Skilled Jobs 38% People 45%  High-Skilled is defined as requiring a bachelor‘s degree or higher  Middle-Skilled is defined as requiring a certificate or associate‘s degree  Low-Skilled is defined as a high school diploma or less Information provided by the South Carolina Department of Employment and Workforce
    85. 85. What Employers are Saying • Criticality of “soft skills” • Improved candidate throughput on pre-hire testing/assessment • Improved graduate throughput in the technical areas for 2-year and 4-year colleges and universities • Reliable candidate pipeline – K-12 through graduate school • Recognized national and international credentials integrated in the educational/workforce development process.
    86. 86. How South Carolina is Responding • South Carolina Workready Communities • Apprenticeship Carolina -- Youth Apprenticeship Programs • Manufacturing Skills Standards Council Certification (MSSC) • Technical Scholars Programs
    87. 87. Contact Information: LaTokia Trigg Area Director, readySC™ 864.592.4158 (w) trigg@sctechsystem.edu
    88. 88. Upstate Career Discovery Center A new era in career exploration
    89. 89. • If you don‘t know where you are going, you‘ll end up somewhere else – Yogi Berra
    90. 90. What? • An amazing new interactive facility to provide an extraordinary career discovery opportunity for the students and residents of Upstate South Carolina. • A showcase for Careers, Companies, Universities, Colleges, Processes, Transitions, Speakers, Products and Pathways
    91. 91. Why? • Because the current discovery process is hopelessly limited in breadth, scope, time, and resources • Because students and people seeking career changes cannot access information about the extraordinary depth and change in the emerging economy in the Upstate • Because the connections have not been made between education and the workforce
    92. 92. Why? • To provide a dynamic system of career discovery opportunities to the citizens of the Upstate • To centralize the career discovery process to consistently facilitate a quality career exploration experience • To provide a showcase for companies, education, training, jobs, and facilities
    93. 93. What HappensThere? • Company Showcases • Career Showcases • • • • • • College Showcases Job Recruitment/College Recruitment Speakers Seminars Product Demonstrations Pathway Analysis
    94. 94. Where? • A new facility at GSP Airport
    95. 95. Who Populates The Discovery Center? • Companies • Schools/Colleges • • • • Workforce Development Offices Training Entities Exhibits Classrooms
    96. 96. Who Goes There? • • • • • • • • • Students Economic Development Prospects Classes of Students People Seeking Career Guidance Companies Seeking to Recruit Companies for demonstrations People Seeking Jobs Parents Visiting Delegations
    97. 97. What Does It Look Like?
    98. 98. TRANSFORMATION AND INNOVATION IN OUR SCHOOLS Jim Reynolds – CEO – Total Comfort Solutions Dr. Darryl Owings – Spartanburg School District 6 Dr. Russell Booker – Spartanburg School District 7
    99. 99. What is TransformSC? We are a business-led coalition of educators, parents, students and community leaders actively engaged in transforming public education.
    100. 100. Good News and Bad News The Good News • South Carolina‘s graduation rates have risen from 60% to 77.5% The Bad News • 1 in 4 South Carolina Students fail to graduate. • 41% of graduates entering technical colleges require remediation.
    101. 101. Transform Our K-12 Model The current K-12 model is badly outdated and cannot produce the learning required of our students in the 21st century.
    102. 102. TransformSC PARENTS: 74% Like their school, but believe we need to re-think how public education works to improve it. 78% Believe teachers are pressured to ―teach to the test.‖
    103. 103. TransformSC Provides… A Framework • Profile of the Graduate • System of Learning Characteristics A Network • TransformED Platform and connections to experts virtually and in person • Statewide and regional transformation meetings Advocacy • Support TransformSC schools with policy makers and state leaders
    104. 104. Profile of the South Carolina Graduate World Class Knowledge • Rigorous standards in language arts and math for career and college readiness • Multiple languages, science, technology, engineering, mathem atics (STEM), arts and social sciences World Class Skills • Creativity and innovation • Critical thinking and problem solving • Collaboration and teamwork • Communication, information, medi a and technology • Knowing how to learn Life and Career Characteristics • Integrity • Self-direction • Global perspective • Perseverance • Work ethic • Interpersonal skills Approved by SCASA Superintendent‘s Roundtable and SC Chamber of Commerce
    105. 105. New Learning Models • Personalized – match to the student, not one size fits all. • Teacher as facilitator, not lecturer - Students are held accountable for their own learning. • Pace to the Individual Student – Students progress after mastering concepts. • Technology enabled – Anytime, anywhere learning with technology integrated into the curriculum. • Evidence based – new testing system that provides realtime, useful information to aid learning. • Effective partnerships with parents, families and communities.
    106. 106. Spartanburg Area Chamber of Commerce 2013 Chamber ADVANCE
    107. 107. Top Identified Priorities 2 Culture for Change 1 Readiness Indicators 3 Projectbased Learning Learning System 4 Blended Learning 5 Evidence of Learning
    108. 108. Top Identified Priorities 2 Culture for Change 1 Readiness Indicators 3 Projectbased Learning Learning System 4 Blended Learning 5 Evidence of Learning
    109. 109. Cradle College
    110. 110. Culture for Change How can we create and sustain support for the changes we believe must be made in order to create systems of learning that result in dramatically greater numbers of students who are ready for success at the next level, PKCareer?
    111. 111. A Full Service Community School
    112. 112. Extended Learning
    113. 113. Viking Early College
    114. 114. Creating a new system of teaching and learning
    115. 115. Thank You
    116. 116. Spartanburg County School District 6, where all students graduate college, career and citizenship ready with a planned path to achieve it Page  145
    117. 117. TransformSC  Work with business and industry to transform education South Carolina  Networking Opportunities with other Innovators – Professional Development  Access to world class consultants to create individualized learning models  Relief from Regulations
    118. 118. Spartanburg School District Six Dorman College and Career Focus School of Business, Management and Information Systems School of Law and Public Service School of Engineering and Industrial Technology School of Medicine School of Arts, Humanities and Communication Page  147
    119. 119. A SCHOOL FOR ALL STUDENTS  Magnet schools within a school  Diploma  Diploma + 1  Associates degree / dual credit  Arena courses  Advanced placement  RD Anderson partnership / completers  Life skills diploma Page  148
    120. 120. COLLEGE AND CAREER CULTURE Dorman Graduates 42.4% enter a 4 year university or college 38.4% enter a 2 year college 3.2% enter the military 8.4% enter the workforce 7.6% enter a certificate program
    121. 121. Measures of Success
    122. 122. Measures of Success % of ACT-Tested Students Ready for College-Level Coursework 70 67 66 62 60 52 50 46 Percent 39 41 44 National 39 40 31 33 District 32 State 30 25 22 20 10 0 English Reading Mathematics Science All Four 22
    123. 123. Measures of Success College Readiness Benchmark 25 23 22 20 ACT Score 20 19.7 22 20.6 20.8 20.8 20.3 20.6 20.3 18 15 Benchmark District State 10 5 0 English Reading Mathematics Science
    124. 124. Measures of Success  Our Assessment Plan  3rd – 8th Grades ACT Aspire  8th Grade Explore  9th Grade Asset  Compass  10th Grade Asset  Compass/Plan  Soft Skills Assessments  Quality Core  11th Grade ACT (All Students)  Workkeys  PSAT  12th Grade ACT  Workkeys
    125. 125. Measures of Success  How many students are eligible to take college courses without remediation?  How many students are career ready according to business and advisory boards? Student Workkey scores
    126. 126. Innovations Already In Place
    127. 127. 9th grade Repeater Data 60 50 # of Students 40 30 20 10 0 2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013
    128. 128. Current Innovations • CAVS class (tutoring, mentoring, making up test/quizzes, bully/career training) • School goals set every year in areas of failures, attendance, discipline, observations, end of course exams, and staff development • Teacher Academic Focus meetings (Student/teacher data discussed and compared to other teachers) • One on One Administrator conferences with failing/struggling students and phone call home • STEM cohort • PLTW classes • Year long math/English with struggling learners • Co-teach model for struggling learners • Writing Workshop
    129. 129. COLLEGE AND CAREER CULTURE • Dual Credit Scholarship Program • Current AP/Dual Credits Earned 358 students earned 642 AP college credits 177 students earned 344 dual credits Totals: 358+177 = 535 students 642+344 = 986 college credits last year
    130. 130. Next Steps • • • • • • • • Waivers…. Purpose and Process “Soft Skills” Course Development Blended Learning (Anytime/Anywhere) Personalized Learning Project Based Learning Opportunities Mastery/ Proficiency Measures Pass/Fail Career Experience Credit Learning Platform

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