Publishing in Higher Education:(some) Practical Advice                    Stuart Palmer                                    1
Writing for publication – why?   it’s fun – or is that just me?   it’s an essential part of a scholarly approach   it f...
Writing for publication – where?   a journal   a book   a book chapter   a conference paper   a performance   an exh...
‘Counting’ publications    RESEARCH OUTPUT CATEGORIES AND WEIGHTINGS    Category                                          ...
Research Publications Collection            RESEARCH OUTPUT CATEGORIES AND WEIGHTINGS                                     ...
Journals – where to publish? seek the advice of an experienced colleague check the journals listed in the references of ...
http://ulrichsweb.com/UlrichsWeb/                                    7
Journals – where to publish? seek the advice of an experienced colleague check the journals listed in the references of ...
Journal impact/ranking factors refereed is considered better than not certain journals develop a reputation for  ‘qualit...
http://admin-apps.isiknowledge.com/JCR/JCR                                             10
http://www.scimagojr.com/journalrank.php                                           11
Journal impact factors – imperfectImpact factors and rankings derived from themare not a perfect science! But… a convenie...
Journals – where to publish? seek the advice of an experienced colleague check the journals listed in the references of ...
ERA journal ranking (still relevant!)Excellence in Research for Australiahttp://www.arc.gov.au/era/default.htmDraft journa...
ERA journal ranking - Education1300 Education1301 Education Systems1302 Curriculum and Pedagogy1303 Specialist Studies in ...
Journal rankings - generalNot all ‘good’ journals are high rankedBut ‘all’ high ranked journals are ‘good’Ranking is impor...
Conferences – general(isations)Good for profile and networkingBut, expensive in money and timeFully refereed only (unless ...
Books / book chapters                        18
The call for papers                      19
Work already done                    20
The love job – yes, but not too many                                       21
The publication syndicatePalmer, S. and Holt, D. (online early), Examining student satisfaction with wholly onlinelearning...
Two different reviews – same paper“I picked up this paper expecting to find a detailedinvestigation of the issues surround...
You can challenge reviewers“Reviewer 1 questions why learning outcomes/achievement wasnot used as an outcome/output indica...
Be strategic plan to write start with quantity, but move to quality                                             25
Making a start – just do it                              26
Be strategic   plan to write   start with quantity, but move to quality   work hard   pounce on opportunities   take ...
Research Pubs Collection – Now DRO!                                      28
Keep in touch with editors chase the status of submitted manuscripts don’t burn your bridges ERA has been a good ‘talki...
Writing write with a publication target in mind know their manuscript requirements EndNote (or whatever) is your friend...
Thank you for your time                          31
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  1. 1. Publishing in Higher Education:(some) Practical Advice Stuart Palmer 1
  2. 2. Writing for publication – why? it’s fun – or is that just me? it’s an essential part of a scholarly approach it forces you to reflect on your thinking it’s an avenue for dissemination of your work it creates a track record for grant applications it earns research income for Deakin it’s an avenue for collaboration etc. 2
  3. 3. Writing for publication – where? a journal a book a book chapter a conference paper a performance an exhibition a letter to the editor a book review etc. 3
  4. 4. ‘Counting’ publications RESEARCH OUTPUT CATEGORIES AND WEIGHTINGS Category Internal Weight ‘DEST’ Score A. AUTHORED BOOKS A1 Books - Authored – research 7.0 5.0 A2 Authored – other 2.0 A3 Revision/ new edition 0.2 A4 Major research monograph 1.0 A5 Minor research monograph 0.2 A6 Research report / technical paper 0.1 A7 Edited Book 0.5 AN Other book, or book not attributed to 0.5 B. BOOK CHAPTERS B1 Book chapter 1.0 1.0* B2 Book chapter in non-commercially published book 0.5 BN Other book chapter, or book chapter not attributed to 0‡ C. JOURNAL ARTICLES C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal 1.0 1.0 C2 Other contribution to refereed journal 0.3 C3 Non-refereed articles in a professional journal 0.1 C4 Letter or note 0.1 CN Other journal article 0‡ D. REVIEWS D1 Major Review 1.0 D2 Reference Materials 0.1 E. CONFERENCE PUBLICATIONS E1 Full written paper – refereed 1.0 1.0 E2 Full written paper - non-refereed / Abstract reviewed 0.2 E3 Extract of paper 0.1 E4 Edited Volume of Conference Proceedings 0‡ F. AUDIO-VISUAL RECORDINGS 0.5 G. COMPUTER SOFTWARE 1.0 H. TECHNICAL DRAWING /ARCHITECTURAL & INDUSTRIAL DESIGN 1.0 I. PATENTS 2.0 J. CREATIVE WORKS J1 Major original creative work 1.0 J2 Minor original creative work 0.2 J3 Poems 0.1 K. OTHER REPORT 0‡ L. CONFERENCE PUBLICATIONS – Distributed / minor conferences L1 Full written paper – refereed 0‡ L2 Full written paper - non-refereed / abstract reviewed 0‡ L3 Extract of paper 0‡ L4 Edited Volume of Conference Proceedings 0‡ M. MEDIA ARTICLE 0‡ ‡Submissions not audited *Score of 1.0 for the first chapter in a book. Subsequent chapters score less. 4
  5. 5. Research Publications Collection RESEARCH OUTPUT CATEGORIES AND WEIGHTINGS Internal DIISRCategory Weight ScoreA1 Books - Authored – research 7.0 5.0B1 Book chapter 1.0 1.0*C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal 1.0 1.0E1 Full written paper – refereed 1.0 1.0*Score of 1.0 for the first chapter in a book. Subsequent chapters score less. http://www.deakin.edu.au/research/admin/pubs/ 5
  6. 6. Journals – where to publish? seek the advice of an experienced colleague check the journals listed in the references of articles you already have search the Ulrich’s Periodicals Directory 6
  7. 7. http://ulrichsweb.com/UlrichsWeb/ 7
  8. 8. Journals – where to publish? seek the advice of an experienced colleague check the journals listed in the references of articles you already have search the Ulrich’s Periodicals Directory consider journal impact/ranking factors 8
  9. 9. Journal impact/ranking factors refereed is considered better than not certain journals develop a reputation for ‘quality’ journal quality is an illusive/elusive characteristic journal impact/ranking factors are one attempt to quantify journal quality 9
  10. 10. http://admin-apps.isiknowledge.com/JCR/JCR 10
  11. 11. http://www.scimagojr.com/journalrank.php 11
  12. 12. Journal impact factors – imperfectImpact factors and rankings derived from themare not a perfect science! But… a convenient, publicly available (if imperfect) metric of journal quality/ranking will inevitably be used as part of any external national research assessment exercise may be used by your Faculty for internal purposes 12
  13. 13. Journals – where to publish? seek the advice of an experienced colleague check the journals listed in the references of articles you already have search the Ulrich’s Periodicals Directory consider journal impact factors consider ERA rankings 13
  14. 14. ERA journal ranking (still relevant!)Excellence in Research for Australiahttp://www.arc.gov.au/era/default.htmDraft journal ranking list A* ≈top 5% A ≈next 15% B ≈next 25% C the rest ≈55% (Unranked) 14
  15. 15. ERA journal ranking - Education1300 Education1301 Education Systems1302 Curriculum and Pedagogy1303 Specialist Studies in EducationAll up, 795 journals ranked under ‘1300s’46 A* journals113 A journalsMany (>≈100) other discipline educationjournals ranked as well 15
  16. 16. Journal rankings - generalNot all ‘good’ journals are high rankedBut ‘all’ high ranked journals are ‘good’Ranking is importantAim for the top, and work down if you have tooIf you pitch low you will get published 16
  17. 17. Conferences – general(isations)Good for profile and networkingBut, expensive in money and timeFully refereed only (unless there’s a reason) -some international conferences are not -most ‘serious’ Australian conferences address DEEWR criteriaDont attend only as a ‘spectator’Always have at least one paper for presentation 17
  18. 18. Books / book chapters 18
  19. 19. The call for papers 19
  20. 20. Work already done 20
  21. 21. The love job – yes, but not too many 21
  22. 22. The publication syndicatePalmer, S. and Holt, D. (online early), Examining student satisfaction with wholly onlinelearning, Journal of Computer Assisted Learning.Holt, D. and Palmer, S. (in print), Quality in flexible, online and distance education at DeakinUniversity: from dual mode to integrated mode practices, in Padhi, N. (ed), Total QualityManagement Of Distance Education, Routledge: New York.Palmer, S., Holt, D. and Bray, S. (2008), Does the discussion help? The impact of a formallyassessed online discussion on final student results, British Journal of EducationalTechnology, v39, n5, pp. 847-858.Holt, D. and Palmer, S. (2007), Staff exercising ‘choice’; students exercising ‘choice’:wholly online learning at an Australian University, 24th Annual Conference of theAustralasian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education, Singapore.Palmer, S., White, R. and Holt, D. (2007), Conceptions of Teaching with Integrity Online inHigher Education: a Case in the Field of Engineering, ED-MEDIA 2007, Vancouver. 22
  23. 23. Two different reviews – same paper“I picked up this paper expecting to find a detailedinvestigation of the issues surrounding professionalaccreditation and distance education in the engineering fieldin Australia but was greatly disappointed. The paper doesdeal with the issues of accreditation, but is does so as apolemic. Its evidentiary base is weak and even thearguments that it makes are self-contradictory.”“This is a valuable contribution to a debate that has not yettruly begun. It is of importance at this critical juncture inthe development of higher education where the expertise ofdistance educators will be called upon to shore up thedeficiencies of campus-based programmes.” 23
  24. 24. You can challenge reviewers“Reviewer 1 questions why learning outcomes/achievement wasnot used as an outcome/output indicator. As noted by reviewer 1,we have already highlighted the link identified in the literaturebetween learning outcomes and student satisfaction. However, inthe project presented here, due to the human research ethicsapproval process requiring that survey responses be anonymous,we were not able to match survey response data sets with thecorresponding individual student academic results. Hence, we areunable to use learning outcomes/achievement as an outputindicator directly. Instead, based on the literature, we use self-reported student satisfaction as a proxy for quality of studentengagement and learning outcomes/achievement. We have nowmade the logic of this research methodology more overt in thepaper.” 24
  25. 25. Be strategic plan to write start with quantity, but move to quality 25
  26. 26. Making a start – just do it 26
  27. 27. Be strategic plan to write start with quantity, but move to quality work hard pounce on opportunities take a ‘portfolio’ approach if you have a choice, finish the manuscript finish off what you’ve started 27
  28. 28. Research Pubs Collection – Now DRO! 28
  29. 29. Keep in touch with editors chase the status of submitted manuscripts don’t burn your bridges ERA has been a good ‘talking point’ do manuscript reviews, etc.  advance preview of new work and ideas  examples of what to do  and, what not to do  editors remember and appreciate 29
  30. 30. Writing write with a publication target in mind know their manuscript requirements EndNote (or whatever) is your friend – reference libraries EndNote is your friend – style files it can be painful to get started practise makes perfect nothing beats sending off a manuscript… …except getting it accepted! 30
  31. 31. Thank you for your time 31

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