Top 10 Causes of FATAL General Aviation Accidents

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Top 10 Causes of FATAL General Aviation Accidents

  1. Presented to: Sun n’ FunBy: TONY JAMESAir Safety Investigator , AVP-100Date: MARCH 27, 2012Federal AviationAdministrationTOP TEN CAUSESOF GENERALAVIATION ACCIDENTS
  2. 2 2Federal AviationAdministrationGeneral Aviation Accident InvestigationOVERVIEW• Getting results through non-regulatory, productivestrategy and education.• Help to understand why accidents occur.• One of the FAA’s top priorities is to reduce thenumber of fatal accidents in general aviation.• Develop an accurate picture of contributing factors.
  3. 3 3Federal AviationAdministrationGeneral Aviation Accident InvestigationNUMBER TENWINDSHEAR or THUNDERSTORMPreflight Planning, Weather Knowledge,“Get Home ‘itis”Contributing FactorsDistraction, Monitoring Airspeed, SituationalAwareness, Multitasking
  4. 4 4Federal AviationAdministrationGeneral Aviation Accident Investigation
  5. 5 5Federal AviationAdministrationGeneral Aviation Accident InvestigationScott Crossfield
  6. 6 6Federal AviationAdministrationGeneral Aviation Accident InvestigationNUMBER NINEMIDAIR COLLISIONSTraffic Pattern, Fly Ins, Glider Operations,Practice AreasContributing FactorsDistractions, Situational AwarenessInstructional Flight
  7. 7 7Federal AviationAdministrationGeneral Aviation Accident Investigation
  8. 8 8Federal AviationAdministrationGeneral Aviation Accident Investigation
  9. 9 9Federal AviationAdministrationGeneral Aviation Accident InvestigationNUMBER EIGHTSystem Component FailureNon-PowerplantElectrical Failure, Cabin Fire/Smoke,Vacuum Pump Failure, Carbon MonoxideContributing FactorsAirspeed, Situational Awareness, Distraction,Pilot Fatigue, Maintenance, Preflight
  10. 10 10Federal AviationAdministrationGeneral Aviation Accident Investigation
  11. 11 11Federal AviationAdministrationGeneral Aviation Accident Investigation•NTSB Identification: CHI01MA011.Accident occurred Monday, October 16, 2000 inHILLSBORO, MOAircraft: Cessna 335, registration: N8354NInjuries: 3 Fatal.The pilots failure to control the airplane whilemaneuvering because of spatial disorientation.Contributing to the accident were the failure of theairplanes primary attitude indicator and the adverseweather conditions, including turbulence.
  12. 12 12Federal AviationAdministrationGeneral Aviation Accident InvestigationNUMBER SEVEN• FUEL RELATED• Bad Gauges/A Good Watch, PreflightPlanning, Weather/Winds, FuelManagement, Systems KnowledgeContributing Factors• Distraction and Trust, Flight CrewExperience and Planning
  13. 13 13Federal AviationAdministrationGeneral Aviation Accident Investigation
  14. 14 14Federal AviationAdministrationGeneral Aviation Accident Investigation•NTSB Identification: ERA10FA502Accident occurred Friday, September 24, 2010 inChatsworth, GAAircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N84249Injuries: 2 Fatal,1 Serious.•The pilots inadequate flight planning and in-flightfuel management resulting in a total loss of enginepower due to fuel exhaustion. Contributing to theaccident was the operators failure to ensure aircraftrecords pertaining to engine modifications and fuelburn rates were available to flight crewmembers
  15. 15 15Federal AviationAdministrationGeneral Aviation Accident InvestigationNUMBER SIXOTHER• Instrument Approach Procedures, Track andAltitude Flown, Pilots Situational Awarenessare UnknownContributing FactorsNon rated Instrument pilotGot to get there ‘itis
  16. 16 16Federal AviationAdministrationGeneral Aviation Accident Investigation
  17. 17 17Federal AviationAdministrationGeneral Aviation Accident Investigation
  18. 18 18Federal AviationAdministrationGeneral Aviation Accident InvestigationNUMBER FIVEUNKNOWN OR UNDETERMINEDSelf Explanatory, No Witness, Recorders,Non-Volatile Memory (GPS)Contributing FactorsAirspeed Control, Bank Angle,Situational Awareness, and DistractionAnd Lots of Other Things!
  19. 19 19Federal AviationAdministrationGeneral Aviation Accident InvestigationSteve Fossett
  20. 20 20Federal AviationAdministrationGeneral Aviation Accident InvestigationNUMBER FOURLOW ALTITUDE OPERATIONS• Pipe/Power Line Patrol, Crop Duster, FireFighting, EMS OperationsContributing Factors• Distractions, Situational Awareness,• Out-of-Date Charts, Cell Phones
  21. 21 21Federal AviationAdministrationGeneral Aviation Accident InvestigationP-3B Air Tanker
  22. 22 22Federal AviationAdministrationGeneral Aviation Accident InvestigationNUMBER THREESYSTEM COMPONENT FAILUREPOWERPLANTSingle Drive Mags, Cylinders, Valves,Cam/Crankshafts, Pumps, and othercomponentsContributing FactorsMaintenance, Preflight
  23. 23 23Federal AviationAdministrationGeneral Aviation Accident InvestigationRear cylinder separation
  24. 24 24Federal AviationAdministrationGeneral Aviation Accident InvestigationNUMBER TWOCONTROLLED FLIGHT INTOTERRAIN• Rising Mountainous Terrain, Dark Night(Moonless), Cleared for the Visual• Contributing FactorsSituational Awareness, Training, PreflightPlanning, Distractions
  25. 25 25Federal AviationAdministrationGeneral Aviation Accident InvestigationKingAir B-200 N45MF• On 2/6/07 the aircraft collided with mountainous terrain.• Night VMC conditions prevailed at the destination.• Wind 300@4kts, 10SM, 11,000 overcast.• The pilot stated to ATC that Bozeman was in sight andwas cleared to descend from 15,000’ to 13,000’.• The pilot acknowledged and requested a visualapproach.• The aircraft was cleared for the visual and radarservices were terminated. (coverage to 11,000’)• The wreckage was located approx. 80 feet below thepeak of a ridgeline at an elevation of approx. 5,700’.
  26. 26 26Federal AviationAdministrationGeneral Aviation Accident Investigation•LAST RADAR HIT•IMPACT POINT
  27. 27 27Federal AviationAdministrationGeneral Aviation Accident Investigation
  28. 28 28Federal AviationAdministrationGeneral Aviation Accident Investigation•Top of Ridge
  29. 29 29Federal AviationAdministrationGeneral Aviation Accident InvestigationNumber OneLoss of Control in FlightEnvironmental Conditions/Wind, Experience,Perceptual, Physical/SensoryContributing FactorsAirspeed Control, Distraction, SituationalAwareness, Currency, Medical
  30. 30 30Federal AviationAdministrationGeneral Aviation Accident Investigation
  31. 31 31Federal AviationAdministrationGeneral Aviation Accident Investigation
  32. 32 32Federal AviationAdministrationGeneral Aviation Accident InvestigationSummationThe FAA has focused on pilotEducation and Awareness,However, better Technology has giventhe pilotBetter Safety Tools.
  33. 33 33Federal AviationAdministrationGeneral Aviation Accident InvestigationContact InformationTONY JAMESAir Safety InvestigatorUS Department of TransportationFederal Aviation AdministrationAccident Investigation Division, AVP-100800 Independence Ave., SWWashington, DC 20591(202) 267-7619tony.f.james@faa.gov

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