Preflight

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  • Click to advance slide.
  • Animation is automatic. Click to advance to next slide.
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  • Animation is automatic. While loss of control flights lead the pack when it comes to GA fatal accidents, NTSB accident data from 2000-2009 shows poor preflight inspections caused or contributed to 156 GA accidents and 41 fatalities. One way of shoring up your preflight skills is to follow the steps of an “advanced preflight,” Refer the Preflight Workshop Handout, Items 1-3, & 7-8.Click to advance slide.
  • Animation is automatic. Remember that you, as Pilot in Command, are the last link in the chain. You are the last chance there is to take some action that will help avoid an accident.Click to advance to next slide.
  • Briefly go over each handout.Click to advance slide.
  • When you are performing the Preflight Inspection try to block out any preconceived ideas of what you expect to see and do the Preflight with the mindset of “What will I find this time?”Click to advance slide.
  • Some aircraft were issued Airplane Flight Manuals (AFM) as simple as a sheet of paper. Some have Owner’s Manuals while others have FAA Approved Pilot Operating Handbooks (POH). The preflight inspection procedures are found in Section 4 of the AFM and the POH. Most older vintage aircraft may not have a preflight inspection checklist available. In this case it is prudent for the owner to devise a checklist using other aircraft as a guide and including any items that are peculiar to their aircraft. For older aircraft that do not have a FAA Approved POH most of the operating limitations are in the form of placards.Click to advance slide.
  • Use the checklist to perform the preflight inspection. If a manufactures’ checklist is not available create one to fit your aircraft using another aircraft’s checklist plus any items peculiar to your aircraft..Click to advance slide.
  • Referencing the preflight checklist. Inspect the cabin. CABIN1. Control Wheel Lock -- REMOVE.2. Ignition Switch-- OFF.3. Avionics Power Switch-- OFF.4. Master Switch -- ON.5. Fuel Quantity Indicators-- CHECK QUANTITY.6. Master Switch - - OFF.Click to advance slide.
  • CABIN7. Baggage Door -- CHECK, lock with key if child's seat is to beoccupied..Click to advance slide.
  • The checklist now has us moving from the baggage door to the empennage.(2) EMPENNAGE1. Rudder Gust Lock -- REMOVE.2. Tail Tie-Down-- DISCONNECT.3. Control Surfaces-- CHECK freedom of movement and security.Click to advance slide
  • (2) EMPENNAGE1. Rudder Gust Lock -- REMOVE.2. Tail Tie-Down-- DISCONNECT.3. Control Surfaces-- CHECK freedom of movement and security.Click to advance slide
  • (2) EMPENNAGE1. Rudder Gust Lock -- REMOVE.2. Tail Tie-Down-- DISCONNECT.3. Control Surfaces-- CHECK freedom of movement and security.Click to advance slide
  • (2) EMPENNAGE1. Rudder Gust Lock -- REMOVE.2. Tail Tie-Down-- DISCONNECT.3. Control Surfaces-- CHECK freedom of movement and security.Click to advance slide
  • (2) EMPENNAGE1. Rudder Gust Lock -- REMOVE.2. Tail Tie-Down-- DISCONNECT.3. Control Surfaces-- CHECK freedom of movement and security.Click to advance slide
  • (2) EMPENNAGE1. Rudder Gust Lock -- REMOVE.2. Tail Tie-Down-- DISCONNECT.3. Control Surfaces-- CHECK freedom of movement and security.Click to advance slide
  • (2) EMPENNAGE1. Rudder Gust Lock -- REMOVE.2. Tail Tie-Down-- DISCONNECT.3. Control Surfaces-- CHECK freedom of movement and security.Click to advance slide
  • The checklist now has us moving from the empennage to the Rt. Wing trailing edge.Click to advance slide.
  • (3) RIGHT WING Trailing Edge1. Aileron -- CHECK freedom of movement and security.Click to advance slide.
  • (3) RIGHT WING Trailing Edge1. Aileron -- CHECK freedom of movement and security.Click to advance slide.
  • (3) RIGHT WING Trailing Edge1. Aileron -- CHECK freedom of movement and security.Click to advance slide.
  • The checklist has us moving from the trailing edge to the rt. Wing tie down.Click to advance slide.
  • (4) RIGHT WING1. Wing Tie-Down -- DISCONNECT.Click to advance slide.
  • (4) RIGHT WING2. Main Wheel Tire -- CHECK for proper inflation.Click to advance slide.
  • (4) RIGHT WING3. Before first flight of the day and after each refueling, use samplercup and drain small quantity of fuel from fuel tank sump quick drainvalve to check for water, sediment, and proper fuel grade.Click to advance slide.
  • (4) RIGHT WING4. Fuel Quantity-- CHECK VISUALLY for desired level.5. Fuel Filler Cap --SECURE.Click to advance slide.
  • As we follow the check list we move from the fuel cap to the nose.Click to advance slide.
  • (5) NOSE1: Engine Oil Level -- CHECK, do not operate with less than fourquarts. Fill to six quarts for extended flight.2. Before first flight of the day and after each refueling, pull outstrainer drain knob for about four seconds to clear fuel strainer ofpossible water and sediment. Check strainer drain closed. If wateris observed, the fuel system may contain additional water, andfurther draining of the system at the strainer, fuel tank sumps, andfuel selector valve drain plug will be necessary.Click to advance slide.
  • (5) NOSE3. Propeller and Spinner-- CHECK for nicks and security.4. Landing Light(s) -- CHECK for condition and cleanliness.5. Carburetor Air Filter -- CHECK for restrictions by dust or otherforeign matter..Click to advance slide.
  • (5) NOSE3. Propeller and Spinner-- CHECK for nicks and security.4. Landing Light(s) -- CHECK for condition and cleanliness.5. Carburetor Air Filter -- CHECK for restrictions by dust or otherforeign matter.Click to advance slide.
  • (5) NOSE6. Nose Wheel Strut and Tire -- CHECK for proper inflation.7. Nose Tie-Down - - DISCONNECT. .Click to advance slide.
  • (5) NOSE6. Nose Wheel Strut and Tire -- CHECK for proper inflation.7. Nose Tie-Down - - DISCONNECT. .Click to advance slide.
  • (5) NOSE8. Static Source Opening (left side of fuselage) -- CHECK for stoppage.Click to advance slide.
  • (6) LEFT WING1. Main Wheel Tire -- CHECK for proper inflation.Click to advance slide.
  • (6) LEFT WING1. Main Wheel Tire -- CHECK for proper inflation.Click to advance slide.
  • (6) LEFT WING2. Before first flight of the day and after each refueling, use samplercup and drain small quantity of fuel from fuel tank sump quick drainvalve to check for water, sediment and proper fuel grade.
  • (6) LEFT WING3. Fuel Quantity-- CHECK VISUALLY for desired level.4. Fuel Filler Cap --SECURE.Click to advance slide.
  • (7) LEFT WING Leading Edge1. Pitot Tube Cover -- REMOVE and check opening for stoppage.Click to advance slide.
  • (7) LEFT WING Leading Edge1. Pitot Tube Cover -- REMOVE and check opening for stoppage.2. Fuel Tank Vent Opening-- CHECK for stoppage.3. Stall Warning Opening -- CHECK for stoppage. To check thesystem, place a clean handkerchief over the vent opening andapply suction; a sound from the warning horn will confirm systemoperation.4. Wing Tie-Down - - DISCONNECT.Click to advance slide.
  • The check list now has us moving from the leading edge to the trailing edge.Click to advance slide.
  • (7) LEFT WING Trailing EdgeAileron -- CHECK for freedom of movement and security.That is the last item on our check list.Click to advance slide.
  • The Preflight checklist is completed. Are you ready to get in the cockpit and fly?Click to advance slide.
  • The checklist did not mention the aircraft documentation.What do the regulations say about the documentation that must be aboard your aircraft? Remember the acronym AROW; Airworthiness Certificate, Registration, Operating Limitations and Weight and Balance. Check to ensure the Airworthiness Certificate and Registration are in the aircraft. This aircraft has a temporary registration due to the recent purchase of the aircraft. Note the pink temporary Registration certificate behind the Airworthiness Certificate. Operating limitations can be in the form of the Owner’s Manual, FAA Approved Flight Manual, placards or a combination thereof.Click to advance slide.
  • The weight and balance data needs to be accurate and current. It must be in the aircraft at all times. Part of your preflight planning includes performing a weight and balance computation. Click to advance slide.
  • Animation is automatic. Airworthiness Certificate is for a different aircraft. Always check your paperwork prior to flight to ensure the correct paperwork is returned to your aircraft after maintenance.Click to advance to next slide.
  • Animation is automatic. Click to advance to next slide.Always inspect control surface hinge lines for missing fasteners, cotter pins cracked fittings and the unwanted tenant. Use caution when moving the control surfaces.
  • Tail Skid is sideways and tie down ring is bent over. You may need to have the rear bulkhead inspected for cracks at the tie down ring attach point.Click to advance slide.
  • Animation is automatic. Inspect all control fasteners for missing cotter pins. A missing cotter pin can cause the nut to loosen and fall off. Once the bolt falls out the control surface or trim tab can move without pilot input or it can flutter sometimes causing catastrophic results.Click to advance to next slide.
  • Animation is automatic. Ensure all panel fasteners are secure and replace any that are missing. Click to advance to next slide.
  • Animation is automatic. Always make sure all inspection panels are secure and their fasteners are tight.Click to advance to next slide.
  • Animation is automatic. Always make sure all inspection panels are secure and their fasteners are tight.Click to advance to next slide.
  • Animation is automatic. Remember the right nav light is supposed to be green.Click to advance to next slide.
  • Animation is automatic. Make sure all landing gear tires are properly inflated. A low tire can break the bead and deflate the tire during taxi or the on touchdown the tire can spin ripping out the valve stem and deflating the tire possibly causing a loss of control. Note also the fluid that appears to be close the brake caliper. Although it is not from the brakes and the source is unknown it would be prudent of the pilot to investigate and try to determine if the fluid is from the brakes or if it is from another aircraft.Click to advance to next slide.
  • Animation is automatic.Oil level is at 4 qts. What is your minimum oil level? Click to advance to next slide.
  • Animation is automatic. Check spinner for cracks and make sure the fasteners are secure.Click to advance to next slide.
  • Animation is automatic. Check spinner for cracks and make sure the fasteners are secure. Ensure there is no FOD in the engine inlets, oil coolers etc. Look for misplaced rags, birds nests or anything else that doesn’t belong there. Ensure all cowling fasteners are in place.Click to advance to next slide.
  • Animation is automatic. Replace any missing cowling fasteners. Make sure the static port is clear. Static ports are blocked sometimes during washing to keep water out or during some instrument tests. Always make sure the port is clear prior to flight.Look at the Preflight Workshop Handout item 2.Click to advance to next slide.
  • Always check the security of the fuel caps. Most modern caps with tabs will have the tabs lined up with the slipstream when the cap is properly secured.Smooth caps should have indexing marks on the cap that align with marks on the wing to show when the cap is secured.Click to advance slide
  • Animation is automatic. Check any safety wire for breakage and that it is installed properly. Remember the wire should be installed so that the tension on the wire pulls to tighten the bolt or nut.Click to advance to next slide.
  • Animation is automatic. The left nav light should be red.Click to advance to next slide.
  • Animation is automatic. Make sure all panels are installed and secured prior to flight. This will be most important after the aircraft comes out of maintenance.Click to advance to next slide.
  • First picture shows fuel sample. See anything here? Second picture shows fuel sample held up to the sky. Do you see anything in this picture? Third picture shows the same fuel sample held up against the white fuselage. Now what do you see? Animation is automatic. Click to advance slide.
  • Can you spot what might be wrong here?Click to advance slide.
  • Remember you did the last preflight!!!Click to advance slide.
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  • Distractions are on the largest factors in forgetting items on a preflight inspection. Conversations and phone calls should be eliminated during the preflight. Use of a checklist will assist in not forgetting an item. If you are inadvertently interrupted always go back a few steps and restart the inspection from there. Always do the inspection in an orderly manner. Do not perform it haphazard going from one end of the aircraft to the other, side to side then back to the middle. Keep it organized and sequential in approach just like the checklist. There should be nothing on your mind but the preflight. (Click)Carry a rag with you when inspecting the aircraft. Use it to clean off oil from surfaces so you can inspect the area. Oil and dirt can hide a multitude of problems. A bright flashlight is very important when inspecting areas like hinge lines and into dark areas of the fuselage and engine cowl. A flashlight is invaluable when trying to look at items when the sun is reflecting off of the rest of the aircraft. It helps illuminate the fasteners on the control surface hinges. The newer LED flashlights are very bright and consume very little battery power. (Click)Smart phones can utilize a flashlight app to turn the camera’s flash into a decent flashlight. Also if you see something you are not sure of you can take a picture of it and text or e-mail it to your mechanic for an opinion before you take off with a potential problem.Click to advance slide.
  • Always approach the preflight like you would if you were inspecting a new aircraft for the first time or before the first flight after maintenance has been performed. Keep your mind open to the identification of discrepancies. Your inspection should convince you the aircraft is safe for flight. Do not take the attitude that it was good the last time I looked at it so it must be good this time. Being complacent in how you do your preflight can lead to you not seeing a defect when one exists. How many more times must the dipstick be forgotten on the cowling or across the spinner hub? How many more fuel caps will be left unsecured or the tow bar still attached? These are all things that happen but they are also things that are on the preflight checklist. Why are they continually missed? (Click)Have a plan if you need a mechanic. Keep the phone number of your mechanic or the mechanic for the rental aircraft handy. You never know when you will need the AMT’s advise on an issue found during preflight. Remember your smart phone. Take a picture if you have to and send it to the AMT for an opinion. If you are in doubt of the condition of the aircraft do not fly it. (Click)Have a plan “B”. Always have an alternate plan in case you find a grounding item. Drive if you have to go to the original destination. Always let your passengers know that if an issue was to arrive that the group would be taking alternate transportation. If the issue arises while at an interim stop or prior to the return leg of the trip and the aircraft can not be repaired immediately that you would be using some form of alternate transportation. Be prepared to spend the night if necessary. Make sure passengers or family is aware of the safety factors in preflight and that you will make the right decision even if it is inconvenient. Do not risk flying an aircraft that is unairworthy.Click to advance slide.
  • The pilot should always try to fuel their own aircraft. This will help ensure the correct grade and quantity is delivered. If you can not fuel the aircraft at least supervise the activity to ensure the proper grade and quantity is delivered. Try to park the aircraft on a level spot to ensure even fueling or to ensure the tanks are indeed topped off. Fueling on an uneven surface can give erroneous fuel level indications. (Click)After each flight the pilot should perform a post flight inspection of the aircraft. The pilot should walk around the aircraft looking for anything out of the ordinary following a flight. The pilot should look for oil leaks, missing fasteners, damage from bird strikes, etc. It is much easier to have items repaired after a flight than trying to get things fixed prior to the next flight. There is the possibility of no AMTs being available to make the repairs if you find discrepancies on your preflight on a weekend. It is a good idea to clean the airplane at this time and to verify all fluid levels. (Click)If you are waiting for your aircraft during maintenance do not rush the AMT or get in their way. This could lead to errors that may have devastating results. If the work involves correcting discrepancies, make sure they are resolved and signed off. Do not try to perform your preflight while maintenance is being performed. This should raise a red flag to anyone seeing it take place. Make certain the AMT has released the aircraft and you have verified it is ready . Remember it is the owner/operator’s responsibility to ensure the appropriate log book entries have been made for the maintenance performed. Get a briefing from the AMT about the work performed and if that works would affect a change in the preflight inspection or any inflight operations. Make certain the aircraft is airworthy.Click to advance slide.
  • When performing a preflight after maintenance has been completed be especially vigilant in looking for items that may have been left behind. Look for tools, rags, fluid spills, missing fasteners, etc. Verify proper operation of the flight controls/systems after maintenance was performed on those areas. The pilot should verify all maintenance record entries have been made including annual/100 hour inspections, ADs, ELT, etc. If you are renting the aircraft try to schedule time in advance of the flight for your review. Clear communication with the AMT is essential. (Cllick)You have been provided an Advanced Preflight M-pamphlet for your reference. This pamphlet goes into detail about how to do a thorough records review. Developing your additional items checklist and some additional resources.Click to advance slide.
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  • Plan your route of flight. Check weather forecast early and again before take off. Check aircraft performance compared to destination airport and any alternate airports along your route. Check weight and balance. Calculate fuel needed. File a Flight Plan. Click to advance slide.
  • Whether you are an aircraft owner or a renter, having intimate knowledge of the aircraft is important. As a renter it may be more difficult to review the aircraft records. It would be prudent to ask to be shown the latest information on the maintenance and current inspection status, status of any ADs, any open discrepancies. If the rental company utilizes a status board for their aircraft ask to be shown how it is used and learn about all the information on it. The more you know about your aircraft the better prepared you will be to find problems before they become an inflight emergency. Click to advance slide.
  • Any good preflight begins with knowledge of: (click) A thorough records review is the best way to gain in depth knowledge of your aircraft’s maintenance history. Use all resources available to you: logbooks and records, maintenance manuals, ADs, service letter and bulletins as well as any repair and alteration history found on FAA 337 forms. Your mechanic can assist you as well as a type club member or the local FAASTeam representative can be a good resource. (click)Intimate knowledge of the aircraft’s systems and components and how they operate and interact is invaluable when trying to troubleshoot an anomaly you discover. (click)All aircraft have areas that are more prone to failure or that require more maintenance than other areas. A thorough records review will bring those items and areas to light. Your maintenance technician can also shed some light on this also as well as a type club. Type clubs usually have a vast knowledge of the idiosyncrasies of the particular aircraft they represent. (click)Having a good relationship with your maintenance technician is invaluable. The AMT is a wealth of information and a resource that you should tap. Ask questions before any major repairs or alterations are started to ensure the AMT is qualified and has the experience to perform the work. Building a good relationship with your AMT will make it easier for you to learn more about your aircraft it will make it easier for you to point out items that you are unsure of or that may need some corrective action.Knowledge is power. With this power you can perform Preflight inspections with the confidence that you can and will find any discrepancies prior to flight where they can be corrected without a risk to you or your passengers.The handout Advanced Preflight M-Pamphlet has information about how to do a records review and an addition items checklist for your preflight inspection.Click to advance slide.
  • When planning your flight review everything closely plan your alternate airports and look for areas that could be used as emergency landing sites. (click)Plan ahead for things that may happen. i.e. engine failure. Think about what you would need to do and be prepared to do it. It is best to have a plan and to do the plan when needed instead of having an emergency and then trying to come up with a plan. Valuable time is wasted devising a plan after the need for one arises. (click)Use your risk management skills to mitigate your exposure to risk. Ask yourself is the risk too high due to the weather? Is the risk too high due to a component that is inoperative? Is the risk too high because you are not feeling well? Use decisions that help to eliminate the risk or to mitigate it to acceptable levels. (click)Break the links in the accident chain. As the pilot in command you are the last link in the chain. That does not mean you can’t find problems and break the links further up the chain to avoid the possibility of having to use the last link to avoid a catastrophe.Click to advance slide.
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  • Preflight

    1. 1. PREFLIGHTGoing Beyond ThePreflight InspectionFederal AviationAdministrationPresented to:By: Western-Pacific FAASTeamDate:
    2. 2. Federal AviationAdministration6/17/2013 2It is said that every aircraft accident has an“accident chain”. There is no one item or eventthat causes the accident. It is a series of eventsand decisions that contribute to the accident. Ifwe were to break any one of the links in thechain the accident could possibly be avoided.
    3. 3. Federal AviationAdministration6/17/2013 3PREFLIGHTOBJECTIVE• With the use of photos and worksheets the audience will“perform” a preflight inspection.• After the “Preflight” we will discuss additional items noton the factory checklist.• The audience will view the preflight inspection again withthe discrepancies pointed out.• What do we mean by “Going beyond the preflight”?
    4. 4. Federal AviationAdministration6/17/2013 4PREFLIGHTOver the years NTSB and FAA Data has shownthat a number of accidents have causal factorsrelated to pre-flight activities.
    5. 5. 6/17/2013 5NTSB Accident Causal Chart050100150200250300350Landing-landingroll-LossofcontrolongroundLanding-flare/touchdown-HardlandingPriortoflight-AircraftmaintenanceeventTakeoff-LossofcontrolongroundLanding-flare/touchdown-AbnormalrunwaycontactPriortoflight-PreflightordispatcheventInitialclimb-LossofcontrolinflightLanding-flare/touchdown-LossofcontrolongroundManeuvering-low-altflying-Lowaltitudeoperation/eventInitialclimb-Lossofenginepower(total)NONEMINRSERSFATLAFS Region (All) Year (All) State (All) FAR Part 091 IMC/ VMC (All) Maintenance Related (All) Homebuilt (All) Type of Flying (All)Count of Evetn IDOccurrence DescriptionHighest Injury
    6. 6. Federal AviationAdministration6/17/2013 6PREFLIGHT WORKSHOPThe preflight inspection can be consideredone of the first links in the “accident chain”.Do yourself and yourpassengers a favor and breakthat link by performing a thoroughpreflight prior to every flight.
    7. 7. Federal AviationAdministration6/17/2013 7PREFLIGHTHandout Materials• 172N Preflight Inspection Checklist• Preflight Worksheet• Preflight Handout• Advanced Preflight M-Pamphlet• Advanced Preflight Article
    8. 8. Federal AviationAdministration6/17/2013 8PREFLIGHTWhat type of preflight do you normally do?Are you the “Kick the tires and light the fires” pilot?Do you follow the checklist to the “T”?Are you the pilot that performs the preflight looking forproblems?
    9. 9. Federal AviationAdministration6/17/2013 9PREFLIGHTBefore we look at the preflight photos please ensure youhave a pencil or pen, the check list, and the worksheet.After viewing the preflight and noting the discrepancieswe will view it again with the discrepancies revealed.For this demonstration we will be performing the preflightlike the pilot who follows the checklist to the “T”.
    10. 10. Federal AviationAdministrationPREFLIGHTIt is one thing to look at the airplane duringthe preflight inspection. It is somethingcompletely different to “see” the airplaneduring the preflight inspection.6/17/2013 10
    11. 11. Federal AviationAdministration6/17/2013 11THE PREFLIGHT INSPECTIONPreflight Photos
    12. 12. Federal AviationAdministrationEnsure you have the currentOwner’s Manual or POH foryour aircraft. It will have thePreflight Checklist, PerformanceCharts and the list of placardsand markings that should be inview of the pilot.6/17/2013 12
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    48. 48. Federal AviationAdministration6/17/2013 48THE PREFLIGHT INSPECTIONBefore we review the Preflight Inspectionyou just completed. Let us look at someitems that were not included in thechecklist and see if we find any otherdiscrepancies.
    49. 49. Federal AviationAdministration6/17/2013 49
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    51. 51. Federal AviationAdministration6/17/2013 51THE PREFLIGHT INSPECTION
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    54. 54. Federal AviationAdministration6/17/2013 54PREFLIGHTDid you notice any additionaldiscrepancies in the in the slides we justviewed?As we have demonstrated following thechecklist to the “T” may not covereverything that should be looked at.It is highly recommended that you follow achecklist. So what do you do now?
    55. 55. Federal AviationAdministration6/17/2013 55PREFLIGHTConsider the Manufacturer’s checklist asthe minimum standard to follow.If you find it is lacking in some areas thencreate your own checklist.Make sure it includes all items on theManufacturer’s list and any additionalitems you deem necessary.
    56. 56. Federal AviationAdministration6/17/2013 56THE PREFLIGHT INSPECTIONNow let’s take another look at the aircraft this timepointing out the discrepancies.Preflight Discrepancies
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    77. 77. Federal AviationAdministrationPREFLIGHTTips and tricks to performing a morethorough preflight.The following are suggestions to assist youin completing a detailed preflight inspection.6/17/2013 77
    78. 78. Federal AviationAdministrationPREFLIGHTAvoid distractions such as conversationswith others during the preflight inspection.Always use a rag and flashlight when doingyour preflight.Smart phone flashlight and camera6/17/2013 78
    79. 79. Federal AviationAdministrationPREFLIGHTAvoid a complacent attitude.Have a plan if you need a mechanic.Have a plan “B”.6/17/2013 79
    80. 80. Federal AviationAdministrationPREFLIGHTTry to personally fuel the aircraft or at leastsupervise the fueling.After each flight perform a Post FlightInspection.Preflight Considerations followingmaintenance.6/17/2013 80
    81. 81. Federal AviationAdministration6/17/2013 81PREFLIGHTPost Maintenance PreflightAdvanced Preflight M-Pamphlet
    82. 82. Federal AviationAdministration6/17/2013 82GOING BEYOND THEPREFLIGHT INSPECTION
    83. 83. Federal AviationAdministration6/17/2013 83GOING BEYOND THEPREFLIGHT INSPECTIONRemember early on we asked what type ofpilot are you when it comes to preflight?Regardless of how you answered thatquestion lets ask one more.When does your preflight actually begin?
    84. 84. Federal AviationAdministration6/17/2013 84GOING BEYOND THEPREFLIGHT INSPECTIONNow that you have thought about it.When does you preflight really begin?If you are going on a short local flight or justgoing up to do some pattern work yourpreflight may start at the aircraft.
    85. 85. Federal AviationAdministration6/17/2013 85GOING BEYOND THEPREFLIGHT INSPECTIONWhat if you are going on a cross countryflight or a flight that may take several days?
    86. 86. Federal AviationAdministration6/17/2013 86GOING BEYOND THEPREFLIGHT INSPECTIONIf increasing your knowledge about thepreflight of your aircraft is important.How about increasing your knowledge aboutyour aircraft records?
    87. 87. Federal AviationAdministration6/17/2013 87GOING BEYOND THEPREFLIGHT INSPECTIONAny good preflight begins with knowledge of:• Aircraft’s History• It’s systems and components• Any weak spots or possible failure areas• A good relationship with maintenancepersonnel
    88. 88. Federal AviationAdministration6/17/2013 88GOING BEYOND THEPREFLIGHT INSPECTION• Prepare for the unexpected.• Make plans on how to deal with problems• Use Risk Management to mitigate therisks and the consequences.• Break the links in the accident chainbefore you ever get in the aircraft.
    89. 89. Federal AviationAdministration6/17/2013 89GOING BEYOND THEPREFLIGHT INSPECTIONWe have covered many things in theprevious slides to increase your knowledgeabout your preflight inspection.Do you think you are ready to fly now?
    90. 90. Federal AviationAdministration6/17/2013 90GOING BEYOND THEPREFLIGHT INSPECTIONREVIEW• Accident Data• Preflight Inspection and Reviewed the Results• Tips to Assist in Performing a Preflight• Records That the Pilot/Owner Should Review
    91. 91. Federal AviationAdministration6/17/2013 91GOING BEYOND THEPREFLIGHT INSPECTIONAny Questions or Discussions?
    92. 92. Federal AviationAdministration6/17/2013 92

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