Institute biz&financ plan Q410

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Business & financial plan for the Institute of Vision and Message from Q4 2010. Nanotechnology, robotics, AI, social development. The Institute would explore reaching social OPTIMUM, Human 2.0 and posthuman society.
Goals would respectively be achieved through deconstruction of all retrograde historic infrastructures and paradigms, which is due to come through deconstruction of retrograde economic structures: division of labor, mass production, competition, value chain and such, and by de-emphasizing its impact on social processes. New plan coming soon.

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Institute biz&financ plan Q410

  1. 1. The Institute of Vision & Message %%%%%Business & Financial PlanJedna od tri d.o.o. / One of Three LLCAna Soric / CEO+385 99 2909011Trg Ivana Kukuljevica 1110090 Zagreb, Croatiasoric@jednaodtri.hrwww.sail.hr/media / www.jednaodtri.hr
  2. 2. Confidentiality AgreementThe undersigned reader ac knowledges that the information provided by _______________ in thisbusiness plan is confidential; therefore, reader agrees not to disc lose it without the expresswritten permission of _______________.It is ac knowledged by reader that information to be furnished in this business plan is in all respec tsconfidential in nature, other than information which is in the public domain through other meansand that any disc losure or use of same by reader, may cause serious harm or damage to_______________.Upon request, this document is to be immediately returned to _______________.___________________Signature___________________Name (typed or printed)___________________DateThis is a business plan. It does not imply an offering of securities.
  3. 3. Table of Contents1.0 Executive Summary .................................................................................................................................1 1.1 Objectives......................................................................................................................................3 1.2 Mission ..........................................................................................................................................4 1.3 Keys to Success ............................................................................................................................82.0 Company Summary .................................................................................................................................9 2.1 Company Ownership ...................................................................................................................12 2.2 Start-up Summary........................................................................................................................13 2.3 Company Locations and Facilities ...............................................................................................153.0 Products and Services ..........................................................................................................................15 3.1 Product and Service Description .................................................................................................16 3.2 Competitive Comparison..............................................................................................................23 3.3 Sales Literature ...........................................................................................................................24 3.4 Fulfillment ....................................................................................................................................26 3.5 Technology..................................................................................................................................26 3.6 Future Products and Services .....................................................................................................274.0 Market Segmentation ............................................................................................................................275.0 Target Market Segment Strategy ..........................................................................................................28 5.1 Market Needs ..............................................................................................................................28 5.2 Market Trends .............................................................................................................................29 5.3 Market Growth .............................................................................................................................336.0 Service Business Analysis.....................................................................................................................38 6.1 Business Participants ..................................................................................................................39 6.2 Distributing a Service...................................................................................................................48 6.3 Competition and Buying Patterns ................................................................................................48 6.4 Main Competitors.........................................................................................................................487.0 Web Plan Summary...............................................................................................................................49 7.1 Website Marketing Strategy.........................................................................................................49 7.2 Development Requirements ........................................................................................................508.0 Strategy and Implementation Summary .................................................................................................50 8.1 SWOT Analysis............................................................................................................................50 8.1.1 Strengths ........................................................................................................................50 8.1.2 Weaknesses ...................................................................................................................51 8.1.3 Opportunities ..................................................................................................................51 8.1.4 Threats ...........................................................................................................................51 8.2 Strategy Pyramid .........................................................................................................................52 8.3 Value Proposition ........................................................................................................................53 8.4 Competitive Edge ........................................................................................................................53 8.5 Marketing Strategy ......................................................................................................................54 8.5.1 Positioning Statement .....................................................................................................55 8.5.2 Pricing Strategy...............................................................................................................55 8.5.3 Promotion Strategy .........................................................................................................55 8.5.4 Distribution Strategy........................................................................................................55 8.5.5 Marketing Programs ........................................................................................................56 8.6 Sales Strategy .............................................................................................................................57 8.6.1 Sales Forecast ................................................................................................................58 8.6.2 Sales Programs...............................................................................................................59 8.7 Strategic Alliances .......................................................................................................................60 8.8 Milestones ...................................................................................................................................619.0 Management Summary .........................................................................................................................63 9.1 Organizational Structure ..............................................................................................................63 9.2 Management Team......................................................................................................................63 9.3 Management Team Gaps ............................................................................................................63 9.4 Personnel Plan ............................................................................................................................63 Page 1
  4. 4. Table of Contents10.0 Financial Plan .....................................................................................................................................64 10.1 Start-up Funding .......................................................................................................................64 10.2 Important Assumptions ..............................................................................................................65 10.3 Key Financial Indicators.............................................................................................................65 10.4 Break-even Analysis ..................................................................................................................66 10.5 Projected Profit and Loss ..........................................................................................................67 10.6 Projected Cash Flow..................................................................................................................70 10.7 Projected Balance Sheet ...........................................................................................................72 10.8 Business Ratios .........................................................................................................................73 10.9 Long-term Plan ..........................................................................................................................75 10.10 The Investment Offering ..........................................................................................................75 10.11 Valuation .................................................................................................................................76 10.12 Use of Funds ...........................................................................................................................76 10.13 Payback...................................................................................................................................77 Page 2
  5. 5. The Institute of Vision and Message1.0 Executive Summary The Institute of Vision & Message is a private research laboratory which will conduct research in nanotechnology, robotics and technology of the social development. Three main locations of the Institute: Facility Incheon City, Korea (to be built), Facility at the Island of Korcula/Blato, which will serve for research in agronomy, economics and genetics; and Virtual institute (to be created), which will serve for research in social development, cognitive modeling, artificial intelligence, and IT neurological research. Proposed business plan and project scope for the next 7 years is a vision of how the market, the high-end technology industries and the society will look like in that time frame and beyond, however, as the market is vibrant and unexpected the Institute will adapt its strategy, projects and all to the market trends. A vision of upcoming society, such an intangible projection of the future could hardly be quantified or measured, yet this business plan manages to put the vision in a relation of expenses, business model and return of investments. Historically, and even more, posthistorically, the idea is for the Institute to create noncompetitive placid society, consequently rendering abatement of masproduction, culturing self-sustainable networked communities who all participate in the same realization of the common good and in reaching global SOCIAL OPTIMUM. Inauguration of the intellect and creation as a main value in a society. Abatement of the social contract. Realization of the human as a free individual. Discovering and applying complex systems. Discovering polidimension(s) placing neohuman or posthuman phase on the lowest notch of the development ladder. Manipulating with atoms and nanostructures, creating new communication paradigm, developing human interaction interface or intelligent cybernetic entity, represent the tools the Institute will use for achieving its goal: reaching the next stage of human and posthumanevolution. If we ought to define business infrastructure of the system(s) we define it as a new open business model thriving on the complexity of the system behind. The supremacy of the proposed system doesn’t mean merely breaking the barriers between sectors: SME-s, academia, corporate, NGO, civil society etc. because it would be a negative definition, it has to be in linking all social producing powers in complex yet flexible infrastructure/ system, hitherto an element of even complex system, or a cluster of systems; congregating infrastructures, ideas, investments and economy sectors. The legal infrastructure is viable as long as it provides flexible, sustainable and non- cumbersome system that both could provide economic feasibility for the contemporary market and sustainability and responsibility for the future one. Furthermore, the goal of the Institute is to create progress, new economies, new systems and new value in a society at Page 1
  6. 6. The Institute of Vision and Messagelarge.A legal framework of the Program is a company with the shared capital, or a cluster of ltdcompanies. The company Jedna od tri d.o.o. (One of Three LLC) would serve as amanagement company to carry out vision and to set the infrastructure for the Institute. TheInstitute’s company will be developed towards Network Partnership (instead of Public-Private Partnership). The goal for The Institute is to be developed into the largestinternational consortium on the planet.Strategic goals of the Institute simultaneously represent the benefits for the Institute andfor the society at large. Deconstruction of all retrograde historic infrastructures andparadigms of the society which is due to come through deconstruction of retrogradeeconomic structures: division of labor, mass production, competition, value chain andsuch and by de-emphasizing its impact on social processes.Deconstruction ofcommunication codes and proposal of a new communication paradigm and even newlanguage. Multiplication of human potential and intelligence. Freeing human being of theconstraints s of the physical (body). Discovering polidimension(s). Proposedinfrastructure of the Institute, surprisingly enough, is capable to generate revenue as wellas to produce new value, infrastructures, idioms and, respectively, a new society andHuman 2.0. Page 2
  7. 7. The Institute of Vision and Message1.1 Objectives The Institute of Vision & Message is a private research laboratory which will conduct research in nanotechnology, robotics and technology of the social development. Three main locations of the Institute: Facility Incheon City, Korea (to be built), Facility at the Island of Korcula/Blato, which will serve for research in agronomy, economics and genetics; and Virtual institute (to be created), which will serve for research in social development, cognitive modeling, artificial intelligence, and IT neurological research. Proposed business plan and project scope for the next 7 years is a vision of how the market, the high-end technology industries will look like in that time frame and beyond, however, as the market is vibrant and unexpected the Institute will adapt its strategy, projects and all to the market trends. The value of the Institute’ s infrastructure is flexibility and complexity allowing any kind of change or adaptation to occur without stressing out the system, or even to constantly produce new systems. Furthermore, it is a vision as how society would like in the near future; even more the Institute will vigorously shape the future, and correspond as a bellwether for the future society,which is its main objective. A vision of upcoming society, such an intangible projection of the future could hardly be quantified or measured, yet this business plan manages to put the vision in a relation of expenses, business model and return of investment. The idea for the Institute is to create a superior infrastructure that thrives on progressive economic idea that perceives the Institute as a research facility gathering global brains and creating brain network able to generate products, revenue and profit but able to generate new paradigms and new society. Idea is to set the basic research and development infrastructure; research would then be conducted at the Institute and in collaboration with other global research teams. In its development the Institute would increase the number of scientist and researchers; however, it would still make an effort to preserve the small teams and focus on collaborating with other institutes, SME-s, corporations, and partnering with other research projects. The objective is to transform vision into exploit. Page 3
  8. 8. The Institute of Vision and Message1.2 Mission Manipulating with atoms and nanostructures, creating new communication paradigm, developing human brain interaction interface or intelligent cybernetic entity, represent the tools the Institute will use for achieving its goal: reaching the next stage of human and posthuman evolution. The research at the Technology of the Social Development division of the Institute could represent the biggest breakthrough since its mission is to generate new reality. The division will try to put into perspective development of the production and production technology, to contextualize division of labor, mass production and their impact on social processes, furthermore to provide a vision of the new socio-political system(s), using simulations and virtual simulations, cognitive modeling, theories of networks, systems, quantum physics, AI, etc.; furthermore it will explore the possibility of creating human brain network interface; also using linguistics, mathematics and semiotics it will tray to produce new communication paradigm. Every development research topic, division and project would correspond to the idea of carrying out the next step of human evolution. Historically, and even more, posthistorically, the idea is for the Institute to create noncompetitive placid society, consequently rendering abatement of masproduction, culturing self-sustainable networked communities who all participate in the same realization of the common good and in reaching global SOCIAL OPTIMUM. Inauguration of the intellect and creation as a main value in a society. Abatement of the social contract. Realization of the human as a free individual. Discovering and applying complex systems. Discovering polidimension(s) placing neohuman or posthuman phase on the lowest notch of the development ladder. Following excerpt from the movie Waking Life represent similar vision, or the perception the Institute can relate to. Telescopic Evolution - Waking Life movie, excerpt from the movie, represent the vision the Institute is relating to: "If were looking at the highlights of human development, you have to look at the evolution of the organism and then at the development of its interaction with the environment. Evolution of the organism will begin with the evolution of life perceived through the hominid coming to the evolution of mankind. Neanderthal and Cro-Magnon man. Now, interestingly, what youre looking at here are three strings: biological, anthropological — development of the cities — and cultural, which is human expression. Page 4
  9. 9. The Institute of Vision and MessageNow, what youve seen here is the evolution of populations, not so muchthe evolution of individuals. And in addition, if you look at the time scalesthat are involved here — two billion years for life, six million years for thehominid, 100,000 years for mankind as we know it — youre beginning tosee the telescoping nature of the evolutionary paradigm. And then whenyou get to agricultural, when you get to scientific revolution and industrialrevolution, youre looking at 10,000 years, 400 years, 150 years. Youreseeing a further telescoping of this evolutionary time.What that means is that as we go through the new evolution, its gonnatelescope to the point we should be able to see it manifest itself within ourlifetime, within this generation. The new evolution stems from information,and it stems from two types of information: digital and analog. The digitalis artificial intelligence. The analog results from molecular biology, thecloning of the organism. And you knit the two together with neurobiology.Before on the old evolutionary paradigm, one would die and the other wouldgrow and dominate. But under the new paradigm, they would exist as amutually supportive, noncompetitive grouping. Okay, independent from theexternal.And what is interesting here is that evolution now becomes an individuallycentered process, emanating from the needs and desires of the individual,and not an external process, a passive process where the individual is justat the whim of the collective.So, you produce a neo-human, okay, with a new individuality and a newconsciousness. But thats only the beginning of the evolutionary cyclebecause as the next cycle proceeds, the input is now this new intelligence. Asintelligence piles on intelligence, as ability piles on ability, the speedchanges. Until what? Until we reach a crescendo in a way could be imaginedas an enormous instantaneous fulfillment of human, human and neo-humanpotential. It could be something totally different. It could be the amplificationof the individual, the multiplication of individual existences. Parallelexistences now with the individual no longer restricted by time and space.And the manifestations of this neo-human-type evolution, manifestationscould be dramatically counter-intuitive. Thats the interesting part.The old evolution is cold. Its sterile. Its efficient, okay? And itsmanifestations of those social adaptations. Were talking about parasitism,dominance, morality, okay? Uh, war, predation, these would be subject tode-emphasis. These will be subject to de-evolution. The new evolutionaryparadigm will give us the human traits of truth, of loyalty, of justice, offreedom. These will be the manifestations of the new evolution. And that iswhat we would hope to see from this. That would be nice.""Ostendo primo conditionem hominum extra societatem civilem (quam Page 5
  10. 10. The Institute of Vision and Messageconditionem appellare liceat statum naturae) aliam non esse quam bellumomnium contra omnes; atque in eo bello jus esse omnibus in omnia."Hobbes,Thomas; Leviathan or The Matter, Forme and Power of a CommonWealth Ecclesiasticall and Civil, 1651Social contract comes after so called „state of the nature“, in which anindividual’s actions are bound only by his or her personal power; „state of thenature“ is a state of, bellum omnium contra omnes, war of everyone againsteveryone. Social contract is a technology by which an individual gives up itsfreedom in order for the society to reach a social order.The phenomenology of the Social Contract should also be perceived in thecontext of socio-political environment and the ideological infrastructure theauthors were part of; way before industrial revolution and even before modern(national) state was born. From that perspective concept of Social Contractwas the highest socio-political technology of the social reality.Question of free will and freedom should be perceived in the context of socialdevelopment, and social contract (Rousseau at large). We could argue, theindividual would never claim its freedom nor power, until the social contract isabated.There is definitely a tremendous need for the individual to (re)claim thepower. In the history of humankind people were never claiming thatfundamental power, rather they were willingly handing it over to theinstitutions of the social contract.Power was never in a possession of just a few, it is a network of individualpowers, as Foucault (1994) claims; however it is being constantly exchangedin this pseudo power-exchange relationship/grid, thus it is impossible tocreate new idiom or accomplish any significant breakthrough.In the context of realization of a posthuman ideal the question of freedomis no longer a question, because it transcends any conveyable idioms,structures or references.One has to use accepted idioms in order to convey and communicate the ideaand the message. However, our language is still rather primitive thus it iseasier to convey philosophical message in mathematical formulas/language/syntax. We should use hapax or an idiosyncratic system or an idea thatdoes not recognize its definition or identity; the entity emptied of itsreferences in order to create new society, which would in the next phaseabate itself to render non-society, or a network of individuals. Therefore forthe significant development to be accomplished we need to create morecomplex language and syntax.Marx (1859) claims social production is conditioned by the development of Page 6
  11. 11. The Institute of Vision and Messagematerial forces of production, independent of individual will. However, inthe new era relations of production diverge, in eccentric fashion(Baudrillard, 1981), from the given superstructures, opening a possibility for anew society to emerge and overwrite historical production relations.Furthermore, future social production could rely on realization of the freewill of the individual since it stems from the complex systems thattranscend Marx’s (1859) idea that new superior relations of production neverreplace older ones before the material conditions for their existence havematured within the framework of the old society. In such a social production(or rather emanation) we could break out from the class struggle as theonly socio-political tool for a social developmet.The main concern in the first phase of the research in the technology of socialdevelopment will be revisiting key elements of the Marx’s HistoricalMaterialism; capital, landed property, wage-labour; the State, foreigntrade, world market.The project that would have its priority would be the ones that are mostlikely to create ruptures in the social contract and ones that are usingtechnology for human and post human social and individual advancement, andwhich are at the same time aimed at bypassing the idea of humankindbecoming slaves to technology; namely:1.Mathematical theorem proving “networked partnership(s)” and/or similarsocio-economic infrastructure (which mean infrastructure based on mutuallysupportive and noncompetitive system) is tremendously more viable thanretrograde economic infrastructure based on competition and like phenomena.2.Mathematical theorem proving the possibility of creating a society outsidethe social contract, transcending historical materialism via complex systems.3.Creating interface for brain-to-brain communication. Page 7
  12. 12. The Institute of Vision and Message1.3 Keys to Success If we ought to define economical infrastructure of the system(s) we define it as a new open business model thriving on the complexity of the system behind. The supremacy of the proposed system doesn’t mean merely breaking the barriers between sectors: SME-s, academia, corporate, NGO, civil society etc. because it would be a negative definition, it has to be in linking all social producing powers in complex yet flexible infrastructure/ system, hitherto an element of even complex system, or a cluster of systems; congregating infrastructures, ideas, investments and social and economy sectors. Economic Vision – The idea of Networked Partnerships presuppose all social producing powers linked in a dynamic Modular Producing Units that at any given moment could be instantly restructured. In the second phase the system will be intelligent enough to make an adjustment organically by itself. Business model for the Institute is set to assure not only swift and constant revenue flow, but to assure self-sustainability of the Institute. The legal infrastructure is viable as long as it provides flexible, sustainable and non-cumbersome system that both could provide economic feasibility for the contemporary market and sustainability and responsibility for the future one. Furthermore, the goal of the Institute is to create progress, new economies, new systems and new value in a society at large. Basic infrastructure: Network, Complex, Fluid, Organic Economic infrastructure: Networked partnership(s), international consortium, weak links in a constant shift able to produce system that would assure constant flow of revenue and investments, ideas, growth and development, making the Institute self-sustainable. The Institute’s framework presupposes research on social development would influence the given infrastructure of the Institute in its development. Page 8
  13. 13. The Institute of Vision and Message2.0 Company Summary The Institute will propose its own infrastructure and the system. System is a cloud (in the sense of computer cluster) of investments, projects, brains, researches, products etc., and it is without designated instance, course or direction. It is a like a cloud or a cluster of dandelion’s (blowhead) propellers. The process of movement and connecting is random. The question is where does the system emanates from; and what is its impeller? Could the system be selfemanating, or could the random energy be the perpetuum mobile? Another idea perceives infrastructure and the system as a double vortex, a self-generating, hyperconnected dynamic entity which constantly produces new reality. Proposed infrastructure of the Institute in 2008 Proposed infrastructure of the Institute in 2009 Page 9
  14. 14. The Institute of Vision and MessageProposed infrastructure of the Institute in 2010 Page 10
  15. 15. The Institute of Vision and Message Page 11
  16. 16. The Institute of Vision and Message2.1 Company Ownership A legal framework of the Program is a company with the shared capital, or a cluster of ltd companies or a stock company. The company Jedna od tri d.o.o. (One of Three ltd) would serve as a management company to carry out vision and to set the infrastructure for the Institute. The Institute s company will be developed towards Network Partnership (instead of Public-Private Partnership). The goal for The Institute is to be developed into the largest international consortium on the planet. The idea is for the Institute to share ideas, researches, data etc. with the companies in the industry who are willing to share the same. In the second phase the data and research would be shared with everyone and all. Rationale behind that idea is that competition is not viable game in the industry any more. Partnership and mutually supportive entities are what could produce greater value. Project documentation that wold follow this business plan will go into details of the proposed legal framework, economic system and any other system, which is a base for the development of the Institute. Category of investments anticipated 1. Private Equity / Venture Capital - global joint venture capital 2. Government (Republic of Korea, EU) 4. World Bank loan 5. Grants 6. IPO Page 12
  17. 17. The Institute of Vision and Message2.2 Start-up Summary Detailed start-up expenditures in appendix 1.0 infrastructure 1.1 Facility location Korea/Incheon................46.800.000 Euro 1.2. Facility location Island of Korčula/Blato............ 2.210.000 Euro 1.3. Virtual Infrastructure......................7.350.000 Euro 2.0 Peopleware.............................8.080.700 Euro 3.0 Mediaware...............................1.870.000 Euro 4.0 Legal.......................................750.000 Euro 5.0 Maitenance...............................450.000 Euro 6.0 Other long term assets..............20.000.000 Euro Total: 87.510.700 Euro 120.530.729 USD Page 13
  18. 18. The Institute of Vision and MessageTable: Start-upStart-upRequirementsStart-up ExpensesLegal $1,530,729Infrastructure $12,000,000 $0 $0 $0Total Start-up Expenses $13,530,729Start-up AssetsCash Required $27,000,000Start-up Inventory $6,000,000Other Current Assets $6,000,000Long-term Assets $68,000,000Total Assets $107,000,000Total Requirements $120,530,729 Page 14
  19. 19. The Institute of Vision and Message2.3 Company Locations and Facilities 1. The Institute facility Incheon City, Korea (to be built) 2. The Virtual Institute – brainharvest.biz, etc. (to be developed) 3. Facility location Island of Korčula/Blato (to be constructed)3.0 Products and Services Products: Innovations (in nanotechnology, robotics, cybernetics, information and virtual products), patents, licences Services: Consulting, advertising, virtual services. Virtual products/services: Virtual spaces selling and renting, virtual product selling, virtual service etc. Page 15
  20. 20. The Institute of Vision and Message3.1 Product and Service Description Projects (Research scopes), Divisions and Products Division of Nanotechnology Research scope Construction and programming of robots with overall dimensions at the nanoscale. Research related to autonomous systems, equipment prototyping, execution software and system development. Innovations A. Develop solutions, interfaces and applications that would lead in a further development of nanorobotics: enable improved visualization of the processes, predictions of the behavior, enabling improved nano to macro world interface. B. Construction and programming of bio naorobots. Nano to macro world interface architecture – an architecture enabling instant access to artificial nanorobots and its control and maintenance. C. Construction and programming of artificial nanorobots. Nano to macro world interface architecture – an architecture enabling instant access to artificial nanorobots and its control and maintenance. (Medium-term research, go to market in 3-5 years) D. Software and an artificial nanorobotic system that would enable automotive nano unit to execute tasks autonomously. (Long-term research, go to market in 5-7 years) Research scope Manipulation with nanorobots and creation of an artificial nanorobotic system in a context of repairing any pathogen in a human body. Innovations A: System that would act as a remedy for any virus, pathogen or damaged Page 16
  21. 21. The Institute of Vision and Messagegene.B: System that would be able to upgrade gene structure in a human body,rendering, enhanced intelligence, extended memory, capability of processinginfinite amount of information, superiority of the human physical structure(e.g. night vision, resistivity to environmental/external influences,augmentation of any other human psychical, mental and physicalcapabilities). The goal is to create Human 2.0(Long-term research, go to market in 5-7 years)Research scope Research in Nanogenetics presupposes manipulation withgenes on nanolevel in the context of creation of superflora which will beable to address the issues of global food shortage. Research will try toexplore the possibility of upgrading and maintaining any gene structure.InnovationsA: System that would be able to upgrade gene structure in flora makingthem resistant to environmental/external influences. Furthermore, the productwill be the system that would be able to upgrade gene structure in floramaking them able to give crop in a drastically abridged time frame (e.g.once a week).(Medium-term research, go to market in 3-5 years)NanoEnergetics Research scope: Research in nanoenergetics presupposesresearch in the context of creating renewable and clean energy combiningSolar Photovoltaics and Nanotechnology. Furthermore, the research scopewould go in a direction of merging superconductivity and nanotechnology.InnovationsA: Product will be a photovoltaic material and the system with itsproperties enhanced by nanotechnology: it will be almost weightless,extremely flexible, superior in collecting and reproducing energy, andapplicable to any surface. Page 17
  22. 22. The Institute of Vision and Message(Medium-term research, go to market in 3-5 years)B: Nanoenergy system capable of implementation of superconductivity,wireless power transmission, consequently eliminating any power source inenergy distribution.(Long-term research, go to market in 5-7 years)Division of Robotics and AI (Artificial Intelligence)Research scope Macrorobotics Research scope: research in a context ofcreating cybernetic tools that could replace human in any kind of work thatis harmful, detrimental and/or servile.InnovationsCybernetic tools able to replace human in any kind of work that is harmful,detrimental and/or servile.A. Cybernetic vehicles/tools navigated with radio signal (GPS or similar) ableto send picture and sound to a remote location, performing operations in ahard to reach agricultural terrains.B. Cybernetic vehicles/tools navigated with radio signal (GPS or similar)able to send picture and sound to a remote location, performing operationsperilous to humans (e.g. under water, in toxic environments, minefields etc).(Short-term research, go to market in 2 years)Research scope: Robotics & AI (Artificial Intelligence) research would go in adirection of creating an intelligent cybernetic entity, capable of self-preservation and independent existence.InnovationsA: Development of artificial human limbs Page 18
  23. 23. The Institute of Vision and Message(Medium-term research, go to market in 3-5 years)B: Development of systems able to enhance human capabilities(Medium-term research, go to market in 3-5 years)A: Intelligent Cybernetic Entity(Long-term research, go to market in 5-7 years)Division of Technology of Social DevelopmentResearch scope: The research will go in a direction of interconnectinglanguage, communication and noise; coding, postcommunication andartificial intelligence in order to explore and produce paradigm shift incommunication, new communication paradigm or any complex socialinteraction system that would replace any known communication codes andproduce idiosyncratic communication environment that would leave farbehind any retrograde social, political or historic infrastructure. Usingmathematical codes, or perceiving mathematics as a most advanced languageand combining it with ancient languages, e.g. Sumerian language, as alanguage that communicates with subliminal codes, we could produce notonly new superior highly complex and multifaceted language (communicationtool) but the whole new society, beyond recognition or even withoutconnection to the previous level of evolutionary development.The research would try to abolish a paradigm of the media as an extension ofthe human body and the human as a pendent of a machine and inauguratenatural interconnectedness of technology and a human, on physical, mentaland even spiritual level.This idea presupposes language is the most important inheritance of thecivilization thus any development or/and creation of the more complexlanguage and its codes could bring to the reinvention of the civilization assuch.Framework: the society is perceived as a. an organism, b. linguistic causality.If we perceive language and its syntax, or even mathematical codes as a freeentities we could be able to discover new paradigm. Not the coding ordecoding but creating new language paradigm could produce change or thenew society without any struggle or class struggle, which would happened not Page 19
  24. 24. The Institute of Vision and Messageso much as a change but as a complete transformation.Division of Technology of Social Development has an important role toassure social responsibility of the Nanotechnology or Robotics division.Furthermore, since most of the researches are interdisciplinary they will shareideas, designs and expertise. For example nanorobotics research could usea system architect or a VR designer from a Division of Technology of SocialDevelopment.Project MindBanking.com is a global business networking portal, offeringservices which empower users to fully develop manage and build theirprojects. The idea is to put together innovators, Private Equity / VentureCapital (or any other investors) and collaborators in one place in order tocreate new vibrant business scene, which would be able to generate neweconomies. Project MindBanking.com has its finances and investmentsplanned. However further development of the MindBanking.com projectwould be financed by the Institute. The projects and development are asfollows:Virtual InstituteThe idea is to create application which would gather scientists, brains,thinkers, scholars and such in one place to create an environment of ideasharing, collaborating, and brainstorming. The Virtual Institute will in thebeginning use the application and infrastructure of MindBanking.com, use andbuild infrastructure and community on existing virtual world e.g. EntropiaUniverse and/or become partner of Entropia Universe, further developingsolutions and worlds in a collaboration. The goal is to create a kind ofsocial parallel universe that will produce new society; to explore thepossibility and the ways in which the creation of new communicationparadigm is possible; to create such an elaborate and complex society, aparallel universe with a profound influence to the real world, (e.g. to influencea monetary infrastructure or generate socio-political changes).The infrastructure: Researchers from the Institute will collaborate in ahighly advanced environment with their colleagues from around the globe,developing researches, projects and products; teams from the Instituteworking on a research in collaboration with general audience/users, throughthe method of "brainharvesting".Visualization or a graphic representation of the virtual world doesn’t have tobe as expected virtual world, represented through 3D humanoid graphiccharacters and the rest, the main point is to create self-producing informationparallel universe, a platform which is complex and at the same time (hyper)interactive in order to stimulate users to produce their own idioms,connections and infrastructures. Page 20
  25. 25. The Institute of Vision and MessageThe strategy presupposes avoiding spending vast amount of time andmoney on cumbersome 3D infrastructure, creating the world that offersnothing new, and imports real life infrastructure.The Schuman Resonance proves planet Earth emits 7.83 Hz resonancebetween the surface of the Earth and the conductive ionosphere, called the“Earth brain waves”. Douglas Rushkoff proposes that the consciousness of theEarth might be awakened when all humans become collectively networked.The Earth can become neural network.The research will show the level of possibility in a given epoch and givenevolutional context whether this could be done by merely taping intounconsciousness and converting it to consciousness without creating aninterface or a physical network.Information is worth nothing if it isn’t shared. Its intrinsic value is itsfundamental “urge” to identify itself through the collective. The problem isthat the social usage and manipulation of information conforms particularinformation to designated social groups, which inhibits social and postsocialdevelopment.Requirements: to create innovative technical, engine and virtualenvironment solution that would give optimized state-of-the-artapplication, optimized graphics control (graphic that uses optimized spaceand could be enough detailed), optimized server distribution, it couldreceive critical mass of users without an overload, creating advancednetwork redistribution of content.A: Highly optimized virtual application and world.Revenue model: subscriptions, pay per piece, selling virtual spaces, sellingvirtual construction sites, advertisingB: Number of solutions, a consequent product which is ready-to-useapplications/solutions or modules for building virtual worlds making thevirtual world an infrastructure that could be assembled from a readymademodules; making any transfer of data, its usage and manipulation possible.The idea is to offer solutions for building infrastructure in order for theresearch and development pace to speed up. The key word is Optimum andoptimization. The goal is to find optimal network distribution of content,developing further the Cloud system as well; to create optimal graphicscontrol system that would enable fast graphics processing and usabilitywith no demands too high.Revenue model: product sales, licensingC: Application for 3D representation and of all human knowledge corpus; Page 21
  26. 26. The Institute of Vision and Messagealso a 3D search engine.Revenue model: product sales, licensingD: Virtual Simulation application (part of the Virtual Institute), applicationable to transform any kind of intellectual product into 3D representation/simulation, whether it is a theory, equation, idea, solution, invention, conceptetc. at the second phase of development application will be able to offer asolution to a problem.E: To create application, which would be able to solve the problem ofcommunication hum, or to harvest it. Able to process many people, a hundredfor example, brainstorming, and to harvest the brainpower. Since harvestinghuman brains and connecting it physical to a supercomputer or evenclusters or clouds of supercomputers is not morally accepted, it is moreacceptable to find or create communication tool witch could basically do thesame.F: To create an interface that would allow human brains to connect directlyvia peer-to-peer.Revenue model: product sales, licensing,Research in Agro Genetic Engineering, Economics and Biotechnology(Island of Korcula/Blato location)Research in EconomicsPositioning the product on the global market; as well as research increating new markets, in the first go-to-market wave with the original productof high quality, and in the second go-to-market wave with the product ofsuperior attributes.Product: new marketBusiness model:Go-to-market period: 3-5 yearsResearch in Agro Genetic EngineeringResearch would be conducted in the context of the possibility to isolateoptimal properties in the plant/scion, and with further manipulation tocreate complex genetic system in which natural properties stay intact, while Page 22
  27. 27. The Institute of Vision and Message the new system builds the plant/scion in its superior new form. Is it possible to create superior plant/scion by isolating only top quality properties form 80 indigenous wine sorts? Such a plant/scion would respectively be resistant to all external influences, and furthermore would produce crop in shorter time intervals. Product: superior plant/scion Business model: patents, applications go-to-market period: 3-5 years A success will assure the creation of the new product, furthermore the creation of new markets, as well as the new paradigms from the socio- economic aspect. The product in such a project is a research per se, and the new markets that would create such idiosyncratic product and business model will promise not only return of investment but the creation of new system through creating an original value chain. The research conducted at the genetic Institute will have an objective to accomplish the paradigm shift in real infrastructure of the value chain the same why as should be able to accomplish new socio-economic idioms and infrastructures.3.2 Competitive Comparison To accomplish the strategic goals of the Institute it will be needed none than sheer brilliance. Document that will follow this business plan will further analyze and develop the idea, vision and infrastructure of the Institute, as well as the projects and technology of their execution. Since the industry and the scene of nanotechnology and high-end technologies are relatively new and unstructured there is definitely plenty of room for partnerships and networking to take place. Competing and competition in a market that isn’t a market yet, or where the ground rules are not established yet, along with the fact that the benchmark is extremely high, we could perceive a strong need for alliances, collaboration and networking of any sort. Furthermore, the ideology of the Institute perceives competition as a retrograde economic idiom which could only abate any development and expansion, not foster it. Page 23
  28. 28. The Institute of Vision and Message3.3 Sales Literature Look and feel of the company/the Institute would be corresponding to certain idioms upon which the brand will be built: Cutting-edge; Dynamics of Networks; Artificial Intelligence; Brain Network; (Double) Vortex; Human 2.0; Neohuman Society; Organic Infrastructure; Hyperstructure; Posthumanism; Modular Units etc. Some graphic representation ideas: Page 24
  29. 29. The Institute of Vision and Message Page 25
  30. 30. The Institute of Vision and Message3.4 Fulfillment3.5 Technology The idea of network partnership would definitely impact on patents realm. Projection is that the extensive partnering would generate proliferation of patents, or their massive increase. The companies included in the research network would have reciprocal share in the patent as to the amount of invested value in the research project. The argument is also that the engagement of many different teams in a network production is a superior infrastructure compared to massive teams in a corporate structure, since every team in the network partnership is bringing its own dynamics to the network, making it more flexible and sustainable. In the literature, which will follow this business plan, the proposed idea will be tested via theory of networks and dynamics of networks. To be exact it will be calculated. We could use the theory of random graph (Rapoport and Solomonoff, 1951); as the ratio of number of edges to vertices in the graph is increased, the network reaches a point at which it undergoes an abrupt change from a collection of disconnected vertices to a connected state in which, in modern parlance, the graph contains a giant component (Barabasi, Newman, Watts; 2006, pg. 11) (Source: Barabasi, Newman & Watts; Structures and Dynamics of Networks; Princeton University Press, 2006, pg 11) Page 26
  31. 31. The Institute of Vision and Message3.6 Future Products and Services Product: Gene infrastructure correction system Service: Product: Matter manufacture device and system Service: Product: Brain peer-to peer interface Service: Solutions, infrastructure and maintenance for the neurocybernetic world(s) Product: Intelligent Cybernetic Entity Service: Solutions and environment for procreation and realization of Intelligent Cybernetic Entities society4.0 Market Segmentation 1. Government 2. Industry 3. Consumer Table: Market Analysis Market Analysis 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Potential Customers Growth CAGR Government 30% 3 4 5 7 9 31.61% Industry 70% 20 34 58 99 168 70.24% Consumer 230% 40 132 436 1,439 4,749 230.09% Total 197.36% 63 170 499 1,545 4,926 197.36% Page 27
  32. 32. The Institute of Vision and Message5.0 Target Market Segment Strategy Target market segmentation could seem a bit broad; however research and development companies, the institutes or similar institutions could only have to distribute their products and services to governments (and supranational bodies) and the industry. Consumer market segment is rather important as well since it is expected to provide the fastest ROI and would assure self-sustainability of the Institute, respectively. Furthermore, it also anticipates growing high-end technology consumer market.5.1 Market Needs The institute’ s goal is to constantly create new values, idioms and perspectives, and that could only mean constant creation of new needs. If we take into account cutting-edge research, products or infrastructure, the Institute will not only constantly generate new needs but new exhilarating markets as well. Page 28
  33. 33. Market analysis summary Nanotechnology & MEMS Industy Overview 2009Companies in Plunketts Nanotechnology & MEMS 300 313Companies in the Lux Nanotechnology Index: May 2008 21Estimated Companies Active in NanotechnologyResearch, Including Start-Ups, Worldwide: 2009 2,200(Plunkett Research estimate) U.S. Federal Government Funding for Nanotechnology Research Source: U.S. National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) 2001 464 Mil. US$ 2006 1,351 Mil. US$ 2002 697 Mil. US$ 2007 1,425 Mil. US$ 2003 863 Mil. US$ 2008 1,554.4 Mil. US$ Actual 2004 989 Mil. US$ 2009 1,657.6 Mil. US$ Estimate 2005 1,200 Mil. US$ 2010 1,639.0 Mil. US$ ProposedBreakdown of U.S. Nanotechnology Research by Agency 2007-2010 Source: NNI (In Millions of U.S. $) 2007 2008 2009 2010Agency Actual Actual Estimate* ProposedDepartment of Defense (DOD) 450 460 464 379National Science Foundation 389 409 397 423(NSF)Department of Energy (DOE) 236 245 337 351National Institutes of Health 215 305 311 326(NIH)Department of Commerce(DOC) 88 86 87 91National Institute of Standardsand Technology (NIST)NASA 20 17 17 17Environmental Protection 12 16 18Agency (EPA) * Does not include allocations of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (P.L. 111-5) appropriations. See the following tables for more information. Quantity Unit SourceGlobal Market for Products Incorporating 400 Bil. US$ PRENanotechnology: 2009 1
  34. 34. Global Market for Products Incorporating 1.6 Tril. US$ RNCOSNanotechnology: 2013Global Nanotechnology Research Market: 14.5 Bil. US$ RNCOS2009Global Nanotechnology Research Market: 30.0 Bil. US$ RNCOS2013Global Funding for Nanotech by 9.75 Bil. US$ CientificaGovernments: 2009Global MEMS Device Market: 2009 8.6 Bil. US$ PREGlobal MEMS Systems Market: 2008 83 Bil. US$ PREGlobal Workforce in Nanotechnology 2.0 Mil. PREIndustries: 2018Japanese Govt Nanotechnology Funding: 1.5 Bil. US$ PRE2009EU Govt Nanotechnology Funding: 2009 1.2 Bil. US$ PRENNI = U.S. National Nanotechnology Initiative; NSF = U.S. National ScienceFoundation;Cientifica = Cientifica, Ltd.; PRE = Plunkett Research estimate;RNCOS = RNCOS Research.Plunketts Nanotechnology & MEMS Industry Almanac 2009Copyright © 2009, Plunkett Research, Ltd., All Rights ReservedSource: http://www.plunkettresearch.com, 2009Nanorobotics and NEMS; Analyst: Margareth GagliardiREPORT HIGHLIGHTS  The global market for nanorobots and NEMS, and related materials and equipment, increased from $29.5 million in 2004 to $34.2 million in 2005, with sales reaching an estimated $40.3 million by the end of 2006. By 2011, the market will reach $830.4 million, a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 83.1%.  Equipment and tools hold the majority of the market share through 2006, closing out the 2006 year with just over 57% of the total global market. This market share will drop radically through the forecast period as nanorobotic devices come to the forefront. By 2011 nano equipment and devices will hold a mere 9.2% of the global market.  Nanorobotic devices have by far the greatest potential for growth in the forecast period. By the end of 2006, devices were worth just over $1 million 2
  35. 35. dollars in the global market. By 2011 their value will skyrocket to $560.9 million, a CAGR over 250%, creating a 67.5% share of the total market.Report ID:NAN042A, Published: March 2007, Analyst: Margareth GagliardiNanotechnology Market Forecast to 2013Nanotechnology is going to pave the way for a revolution in materials, informationand communication technology, medicine, genetics, etc as it starts moving from thelaboratories to new markets. It helps to improve products and production processeswith better characteristics or new functionalities. In coming years, products based onnanotechnology will have a huge impact on nearly all-industrial sectors and will enterthe consumer market in large quantities.Considering the future prospects of nanotechnology, countries across the world areinvesting heavily in this sector to reap maximum benefits from it. According to ourresearch reort “Nanotechnology Market Forecast to 2013”, the global nanotechnologymarket is projected to grow at a CAGR of over 18% during 2010-2013. The reportexpects that the global market for nanotechnology incorporated in manufacturedgoods will worth US$ 1.6 Trillion, representing a CAGR of around 50% in the forecastperiod (2010-2013). This prospective growth will largely be driven by massiveinvestment in nanotechnology R&D by both governments and corporates worldwide.The report also reveals that the Asia-Pacific region will experience thefastest growth in the market for nanotechnology enabled goods at a CAGRof nearly 52% between 2007 and 2013. The recent move by the emerging 3
  36. 36. markets such as South Korea and China to concentrate on nanotechnologyResearch and Development (R&D) will continue to play the mostprominent role in the growth of nanotechnology.The report also contains comprehensive information about the development ofnanotechnology market in the US, with focus on budget allocation for R&D, agenciesworking in this field, and federal funding. Our new research report thoroughlyevaluates the past, current and future scenario of the global nanotechnology marketcoupled with an overview of emerging trends. The report has segmented thenanotechnology market by application and by R&D investment. The applicationsection gives an overview of nanotechnology integration in the field of electronic,energy, cosmetic, biomedical and defense. The R&D investment section talks aboutinvestment made globally by governments, corporates and venture capital. Thereport has studied the nanotechnology market of other key countries separately toshow their prominence in the sector. Besides, the report covers various growthpotential areas at the global level to help clients understand the nanotechnologyimportance in sophisticated areas.Nanotechnology Market Forecast to 2013; ReportLinker; March 2010South Korea top three countries for robotics technologySEOUL, April 17 (UPI) — South Korean officials said Friday they have created a planto boost the nation into the top three countries for robotics technology andapplications by 2013.The officials said the plan was finalized Friday at a meeting of the National Scienceand Technology Council that was chaired by President Lee Myung-bak, The KoreaTimes reported Friday.The Robot Special Act, which calls for a $750,000 investment in research anddevelopment, aims to propel South Korea into the top three nations for robotics by2013 and capture 20 percent of the global market by 2018.“By 2013, the domestic robot market will reach four trillion won ($3 million) in value,lift Korea’s global market share to 13.3 percent and boost robot exports to $1billion,” Knowledge and Economy Minister Lee Youn-ho said.http://robotechno.us/south-korea-top-three-countries-for-robotics-technology.html,2010 4
  37. 37. The Institute of Vision and Message5.2 Market Trends Dominance in government funding The trend in the industry is that the global investment into nanotechnology is mainly governmental. The VC funding only accounted for 7% of the total global investment into nanotechnology in 2008.Since projections and analysis show serious expansion of the nanotechnology market and its growth, in the next couple of years, it could be the cue for PE/VC to reconsider nanotechnology industry and scene as an important investment opportunity. Investors should bring with them industry knowledge and their network, along with financial investments, to help companies develop and market products in an efficient fashion.(Source:http://www.earthtimes.org/articles/show/ research-and-markets-global-nanotechnology,1088640.shtml, 2010) Increasing growth of the industry and international partnerships with start-ups The idea of partnerships is already in deployment, the data is from 2002: 1. Nanocor and Mitsubishi Gas Chemical joint partnership in developing nanoclays for nanocomposits 2. Nanosys and Matsushita Electric joint developing in solar cells technology 3. Applied Nanotech and Mitsubishi Heavy Industriesjoint partnership in developing carbon nanotubes for Flat Panel Displays (Source: Asia Pacific Nanotech Weekly, Vol. 1, article #25, 2003) Treating patent applications for nanotechnology Experts have observed that there is a growing trend to file for patents earlier, and file more of them. That could potentially hamper innovation by acting as a disincentive for other institutions to embark on similar research. Although this is a general trend in patenting, nanotechnology-related inventions could be especially affected since it is a young and growing field. To avoid an inflation of low-quality patent applications that could clog up the EPO and create a backlog, the EPO has introduced a quality policy to bring certainty to the market, for both the applicant and the public. The EPO’s approach is one of "quality rather than quantity." The Y01N tags are one element in this approach, since they enable EPO examiners to monitor emerging nanotechnology inventions and to perform better patentability searches. The EPO has also put measures in place to Page 29
  38. 38. The Institute of Vision and Messageensure that nanotechnology applications are treated by examiners with theright experience in the specific field.OutlookWhen it comes to nanotechnology patenting, the United States continues tolead the way, followed by Japan and Europe. Some regional differences innano application trends have already been noted: while nanobiotechnologydominates the European sphere, in Japan the bulk of patents published are innanoelectronics.The EPO works with the Japan Patent Office and the United States Patent andTrademark Office to look at shared problems and how each countryaddresses them. Collaborating on the nanotechnology issue could help allthree offices tackle common problems that have arisen with the emergence ofthis exciting new technology.(Source: http://www.epo.org/topics/issues/nanotechnology.html, 2010)NANOTECHNOLOGY PATENT TRENDSPatents issuing every week demonstrate the growing importance ofnanotechnology. In many cases, technology which was first conceived in the1970s and early 1980s, often as academic curiosities, have now become amajor area of commercial development under the nanotechnology rubric.Several examples are noted below reflecting different areas ofnanotechnology. The atomic force microscope (AFM) is a powerful,fundamental nanotechnology tool and was first patented in 1988 by Bennigand IBM. By 1994, over 100 patents issued per year, and by 2003, over 500patents were issuing per year referring to this tool (Figure 1). Quantumdots and dendrimers, similarly, are examples of nanomaterials first patentedin the mid-1980s. By 1994, over ten patents issued per year, and by 2003,over 100 patents were issuing per year referring to each of these materials(Figures 2 and 3).Figure 1Number of US Patents Referring To "AFM" or "Atomic Force Microscope" Page 30
  39. 39. The Institute of Vision and MessageFigure 2Number of Patents Referring To "Quantum Dot" Page 31
  40. 40. The Institute of Vision and MessageFigure 3Number of Patents Referring To "Dendrimer"(Source: V. Koppikar, S.B. Maebius, J.S. Rutt; Current Tends in Nanotech Patents: A ViewFrom Inside the Patent Office; Nanotechnology Law & Business; Volume 1, Issue 1, Article4, 2003)Rich in intellectual propertyExperts across Europe are in no doubt: Todays economy is becomingincreasingly knowledge-based and intellectual property in the form ofpatents plays a vital role in this growth. Between 1992 and 2002, the numberof patent applications filed in Europe, Japan and the United States grew bymore than 40 percent. The number of patents filed with the EuropeanPatent Office reflects that trend, going from approximately 100,000applications in 1997 to nearly 193,000 in 2005. This is due, in part, toindividual inventors, SMEs, large companies and research institutions realisingthe importance and economic impact of patenting their innovations. The keyobservation here: Patents can encourage innovation and economic growthunder certain conditions and hamper it under others. The impact of patentson innovation and economic performance is so complex that a fine-tunedpatent system is crucial to ensure maximum benefit for a countrys firms andits overall economy. (Source: http://www.epo.org/topics/innovation-and-economy/economic-impact.html, 2010) Page 32
  41. 41. The Institute of Vision and Message5.3 Market Growth Projection is that the market for nanotechnology products is yet to flourish in a couple of years. Projection is for Global Market for Products Incorporating Nanotechnology will grow in 2013 to 1.6 trillion US dollars, representing a CAGR of more than 49% in the forecast period 2009-2013. According to our report findings, at the regional level, the Asia-Pacific region will experience the fastest growth in market for nanotechnology enabled goods, with CAGR pegged at around 52% in the forecast period, followed by Europe. (Source: RNCOS, 2010) The nanotechnology market is dominated by the US, followed by Europe and Asia-Pacific region. However, initiatives undertaken by EU as part of its Seventh Framework Programme (FP7) will help the region emerge as a dominant player on the global nanotechnology map by 2013. The EU FP7 will be contributing approximately 600 Million per year until 2013 towards nanotechnology. Also, the presence of Japan, South Korea, China and India will foster highest growth in the Asia-Pacific region over the forecast period. (Source: http://nanobizexchange.com/?p=18) "Nanotechnology is going to pave the way for a revolution in materials, information and communication technology, medicine, genetics and so on as it starts leaving the laboratories and conquering new markets. It helps to improve products and production processes with better characteristics or new functionalities. In coming years, products based on nanotechnology are expected to impact nearly all-industrial sectors, entering into the consumer markets in large quantities. Considering the future prospects of nanotechnology, countries across the world are investing heavily into this sector.“ Key Findings § The rapidly commercializing nanotechnology market presents potential market in various industrial sectors including energy, textiles and life sciences. § The market for nanotechnology in manufacturing goods is forecasted to grow at a CAGR of 33% during the period from 2007 to 2015. § The market for nanotechnology into consumer products is projected to Page 33
  42. 42. The Institute of Vision and Messagegrow at an AAGR of 9.4% from 2005 to 2010.§ The global spending on nanotechnology grew by 29% in 2006 withgovernment share standing at 52% followed by corporate and venturecapitalist spending.§ Nanotechnology investments by the government were initially led byEurope, North America and Japan. However, countries such as Russia,China, Brazil, Turkey and India have joined the trend and are makingsignificant investments into the sector.§ Asia-Pacific is anticipated to be the most important region for the salesof nanotechnology products in near future, followed by the US and Europe atsimilar level.“Nanotechnology Market Forecast till 2011”, RNCOS, 2009The nanophotonic component market is growing at a robust rate forthe last few years and is expected to maintain a very high CAGR for thenext few years. The market is expected to reach US$3.6 billion in 2014at a CAGR of 100.7% from 2009 to 2014.Untapped market potential and benefits are the primary factors for theearly adoption. Though most of the nanophotonic products are still underresearch, the available products such as nanophotonic LEDs, nanophotonicPV cells, nanophotonic OLEDs have been very successful in the market.Nanophotonic LEDs has the largest market share of US$106 million in2009. However, considering the pace of progress in various othersegments like near-field-optics, optical amplifiers, optical switches andholographic memory, it can be safely ascertained that holographicmemory and optical switches are expected to have the highest growthrate in the next five years. Nanophotonic LEDs will still continue to belargest segment albeit with a slow growth rate.(Source: http://www.marketsandmarkets.com, 2010)Nanotechnology in European patentsNanotechnology is considered by many to be one of the key technologiesof this century, with an expected market volume of EUR 1 trillion in2015. In 2004, about EUR 8 billion was invested in nanotechnologyresearch and development worldwide. The European Commission, realisingthe future importance of this new field, funds nanotechnology projectswith roughly EUR 500 million a year, an amount that is likely to doubleover the next decade or two, according to an EC source. Page 34
  43. 43. The Institute of Vision and Message(Source: http://www.epo.org/topics/issues/nanotechnology.html, 2010)Korea Puts $750M in Robotics, Aims to Lead Market by 201804.20.2009 — The government of South Korea has promised to invest 1trillion Won (about $750 million U.S. dollars) in the country’s roboticsindustry in an attempt to accelerate its growth.The goal is to help the global robotics market grow to more than $30billion by 2013 and to help Korean companies take as much as 10 percentof that market, according to Huh Kyung, Director General for EmergingIndustry in the government’s Ministry of Knowledge Economy, which isresponsible for regulating and overseeing high-tech industries in SouthKorea.The First Basic Plan for Intelligent Robots calls for Korea to be one of thetop three producers of robotic products by 2013 and the leadingproducer by 2018. That would total more than $1 billion U.S. for exportand $3 billion for internal consumption.The Republic of Korea has treated its IT infrastructure and industries askey drivers of economic growth since the mid-1990s, and committed itselfto promoting the service robotics industry in 2004, according to Dan Kara,president and editor of Robotics Business Review.At that time the Korean economic ministry put in place a strategy calledIT839, whose goal was to build a robust internal IT networkinginfrastructure, and promote specific high-tech industries, including servicerobotics. It invested $264 million over five years in 16 projects designedto boost the domestic intelligent robotics industry, Kara said.The effort, and Korea’s robotics manufacturers, have been remarkablysuccessful, according to Kara.“I’m not surprised the [Korean] government sees robotics as a driver forthe economy,” agreed Barbara Coffey, analyst at financial services firmKaufman Brothers. “The South Korean market has been a huge winner incell phones and other electronics. They’ve been a leader in digitalbroadcasts and in uses for small devices, so they’re probably in a goodposition for robotics as well, as far as manufacturing and research[capabilities].”Speaking at last week’s RoboBusiness conference in Boston, Rus predictedthat the market for service robots alone would grow from about $600million in 2002 to more than $52 billion by 2025, largely driven by the Page 35
  44. 44. The Institute of Vision and Messageneed to care for increasingly elderly populations in both the U.S. and inAsian countries, including Korea and Japan.Kevin Fogarty; http://www.roboticstrends.com/service_robotics/article/korea_to_put_750m_in_robotics_industry; 2010Second Life Economy Hits New All-Time High in Q1 2010 Highlights for the QuarterThe Second Life economy kicked off 2010 with strength in many key indicatorsin Q1. User-to-User Transactions totaled US$160 million, a 30% increase year-to-year and an all-time high Total Sales on Xstreet reached US$2.3 million, an 82% increase year- to-year and a 24% increase over the previous quarter Total L$ exchanged on the LindeX totaled US$31 million, a 9% increase year-to-year Residents active in the Economy reached 517,349 in March, a 2010 high Monthly Unique Users with Repeat Logins peaked in March at 826,214, a 13% increase year-to-year and an all-time highSecond Life continues to be the largest user-generated virtual economy in theworld, and as we reported in our 2009 year-end economy blog post, reachedUS$567 million in user-to-user transactions in 2009, with gross residentearnings of US$55 million. The scale and continued growth of Second Lifeare a highlight in a quarter which saw the closure of a few longstandingcompanies in the virtual world space. We wish the customers andemployees of those companies well.2009 End of Year Second Life Economy Wrap up (including Q4 Economy inDetail) Second Life economy totals $567 million US dollars in 2009 - 65% growthover 2008Gross Resident Earnings are $55 million US Dollars in 2009 - 11%growth over 2008In 2009, the rest of the world caught up with what Second Life Page 36
  45. 45. The Institute of Vision and MessageResidents have known for a long time - that virtual goods can be a verygood business. Headlines about a billion-dollar plus trade in virtualitems appeared in the mainstream press, but in many cases the articlesfocused on the platforms that create and provide virtual goods to theirusers, not on the users themselves.And this is what sets Second Life apart: our users create, merchandise,and sell virtual goods as part of the largest user-generated 3D virtualgoods economy in the world. By any measure - number of items,transactions, dollar value, revenues earned - Second Life is the leader.In 2009, Second Life Residents earned more than twice that amount -US$55 million - while the total size of the Second Life economy grew65% to US$567 million.And all of that is due to the creativity and innovation of the Second LifeResidents.By way of comparison, real-world global output is forecast to havedeclined 1.1% in 2009 (see the IMF World Economic Outlook report,October 2009). The Bureau of Economic Analysis will post figures for theUS economy for Q4 and 2009 on January 29th, but their most recentforecast was for the US economy to have shrunk by 2.7% in 2009.Despite a challenging macro environment, the Second Life economy didquite well to grow in 2009.Before we dive into the numbers for 2009, we want to acknowledge thatlast year was an economically challenging one for many people in thereal world and many Second Life Residents. Some Second Life Residentbusinesses faced hard times while others flourished. Our focus is towork hard in 2010 (and beyond) to increase the number of Second LifeResidents, so that the Second Life economy will continue to grow, givingall Residents the opportunity to benefit.Source: http://blogs.secondlife.com/community/features/blog, 2010 Page 37
  46. 46. The Institute of Vision and Message6.0 Service Business Analysis Globally, the main division in nanotechnology industry is on Research & Community and Commercial (B2B). The Institute would natively be positioned in a Government, Industry & Private Laboratories, although it will interact and collaborate with all other divisions and sectors in the industry. Research & Community :University Departments, Labs & Research Groups (940); Government, Industry & Private Laboratories (311); Initiatives & Networks (460); Associations & Societies (21). Commercial (B2B): Raw Materials (269); Biomedicine & Life Sciences (328); Products, Applications, Instruments & Technologies (1215); Services, Intermediaries & Other (249). (Source: http://www.nanowerk.com/nanotechnology/, 2010) The similar would be in robotics department of the Institute. The general idea is for the Institute to serve as an agency for perpetuation of global human and posthuman progress and development, furthermore as an agent for congregation and interaction between all social producing powers, an architect of the new systems etc. Page 38
  47. 47. The Institute of Vision and Message6.1 Business Participants Some global participants in a nanotechnology industry (100 out of 311 of them) representing Government, Industry & Private Laboratories sector. Acreo (Sweden) Acreo, a contract R&D lab, deals with several aspects of optical components and systems for various applications. The company develops and manufactures new components or materials with new properties based on semiconductor structures in the nanometer scale. Examples are new types of light sources, detectors or modulators. Advanced Materials Group, Institute for Scientific and Technological Research of San Luis Potosi (Mexico) Theoretical and experimental research of new materials, mainly focused to nanostructures. Advanced Materials Research Center (AMRC) (USA) The Advanced Materials Research Center (AMRC) is a industry-driven virtual R&D center focused on the commercialization of advanced technologies. The center is a collaboration between the State of Texas, SEMATECH, and the states research universities. Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) (USA) Invests in basic research efforts for the Air Force in relevant scientific areas. Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Materials and Manufacturing Directorate (USA) The AFRL ML develops materials, processes, and advanced manufacturing technologies for aircraft, spacecraft, missiles, rockets, and ground-based systems and their structural, electronic and optical components. AIST Nanoarchitectonics Research Center (Japan) The Nanoarchitectonics Research Center, in close collaboration with the Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, the University of Tokyo, aims to establish bottom-up nanoscale technologies based on molecular self-assembly, hierarchical atomic nanostructure construction and atomic level measurement techniques. AIST NanoProcessing Partnership Platform (Japan) Utilizing the AIST NanoProcessing Facility and the AIST Technical Service Center, the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) conducts the NanoProcessing Partnership Platform as a part of Nanotechnology Network Japan of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT). AIST Research Center for Advanced Carbon Materials (Japan) The Nano-Carbon Materials team at the Center develops original synthetic approaches to fabricate rational nanoscale materials as basic building blocks and the hierarchical assembly of these nanomaterials to fundamental elements for nanodevices that would serve as functional components for applications in nanotechnology. Ames Laboratory - Biomolecular Materials Chemistry (USA) Research includes nanocomposites and nanostructures. Argonne National Laboratory - Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) (USA) The CNMs mission includes supporting basic research and the development of advanced instrumentation that will help generate new scientific insights and create new materials with novel properties. Army Research Laboratory (USA) The research facility of the US Army. Asian Institute of Technology - Nanotechnology (Thailand) Research topics are self-organization, nanoparticles, quantum dots and nanowires Atomic Energy Center Bariloche - Nanoscience Research (Argentina) The centers mission is to organize an internationally recognized focal point in Bariloche for the research and the technological development of nanoscale materials. Bay Zoltan Institute For Materials Science And Technology (Hungary) Page 39
  48. 48. The Institute of Vision and MessageThe mission of the Institute is to play a dominant role in the materials science and technologyinnovation chain, first of all in the field of laser technology, metal technology and simulation, polymertechnology and nanotechnology.Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS) (PR China)The research directions of BNLMS include: (1) structure and transformation of matter; (2) materialschemistry; (3) nanoscience and nanotechnology; (4) polymer science and engineering; (5) chemistry inlife science; (6) environmental and energy chemistry.Bell Labs (USA)The research arm of Lucent-Alcatel conducts nanotechnology rseaerch such as for instancenanostructured surfaces.Berkeley Lab - The Molecular Foundry (USA)The Molecular Foundry at Berkeley Lab is a user facility for the design, synthesis andcharacterization of nanoscale materials.Berkeley Sensor & Actuator Center (BSAC) (USA)BSAC is the National Science Foundation Industry/University Cooperative Research Center forMicrosensors and Microactuators, conducting industry-relevant, interdisciplinary research on micro-and nano-scale sensors, moving mechanical elements, microfluidics, materials, and processes thattake advantage of progress made in integrated-circuit, bio, and polymer technologies.BioMaDe (Netherlands)Biomade Technology Foundation is a research institute whose mission is to develop and exploitmolecular nanotechnologies.BioSciences Research Institute (BRI) (India)BioSciences Research Institute (BRI) has been setup as a premier Institute for Research &Development and Advanced Training in the field of BioSciences. Research includes nanotechnology.Boeing Phantom Works (USA)Boeing Phantom Works is the advanced research and development unit at Boeing and the catalyst ofinnovation for the Boeing enterprise. For instance, they are working to create an entirely new class ofnanostructured aluminum alloys. These lab-produced materials deliver titaniums strength - over a widetemperature range - in a much lighter material.Brookhaven National Laboratory - Center for Functional Nanomaterials (USA)The Brookhaven National Laboratory Center for Functional Nanomaterials will provide researchers withstate-of-the-art capabilities to fabricate and study nanoscale materials.Burnham Institute for Medical Research (USA)Through special grants awarded by the NIH, the Burnham has been designated as one of fourcenters for devising new therapies for cardiovascular disease using bionanotechnology.Bussan Nanotech Research Institute (XNRI) (Japan)XNRI is focused on developing unique technologies that have been enabled by the fusion of a diverserange of disciplines centering around nanotechnology, technologies that will allow them to direct theirefforts into research areas related to the environment, energy and medicine.Caesar Research Center (Germany)Major research centre with multidisciplinary approach including materials, nanobio, electronics,microrobotics.California Institute of Nanotechnology (USA)The California Institute of Nanotechnologys mission is to conduct research and development andprovide professional education and training in the frontier of nanotechnology to meet the needs ofthe emerging industry for the benefit of the society. The institute conducts advanced and appliedresearch in nanotechnology to help solve major problems facing mankind such as diseases,shortage of energy and global environmental issues.Canadian Institute for Advanced Research - Nanoelectronics (Canada)CIFAR selects research areas that tackle fundamental questions challenging our understanding ofthe natural world and of human society. Its Nanoelectronics program focuses both on fundamentalscience of how materials behave at the nanometer scale, and engineering issues such as creating newnanomaterials used for both research and applications.CANMET Materials Technology Laboratory (Canada) Page 40
  49. 49. The Institute of Vision and MessageCANMET-MTL has nanotechnology projects in the areas of hydrogen storage and noxious gassensors.Carolina Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence (CCNE) (USA)CCNE goal is to design and fabricate novel and innovative, multifunctional nanodevices and then testtheir in vivo performance using sophisticated mouse models of human cancer.CEA INAC Laboratory Silicon Nanoelectronics Photonics and Structures (France)The SiNaPS laboratory is committed to basic research on the optical and physical properties of low-dimensional semiconductor structures and their applications to nano optics and nano electronics.CEA Leti (France)(Website in French) One of the largest applied research laboratories in Micro and Nanotechnologies inEurope, it focuses on microelectronics and microsystems on silicon, systems for biology and health,and optoelectronic and components.Cell Propulsion Lab - UCSF/UCB Center for Engineering Cellular Control Systems (USA)The labs goal is to understand the fundamental design principles of cellular control systems and toapply these principles to engineer cells or cell-like devices with novel, smart therapeutic functions.CEMES Center for Materials Elaboration and Structural Studies (France)The CEMES goals are for one part to establish links between the atomic architecture and thephysical and chemical properties of a material or a nano-material and for another part to design,synthesise and study the first prototypes of molecular nano-machines, studied one at a time.Cenamps (UK)Cenamps is an entrepreneurial, not-for-profit company established in the North East of England, withthe aim of strengthening the regions economic foundation, R&D capabilities and performancethrough the creation of high-tech jobs and new business opportunities. Various nanotechnologyprojects are part of Cenamps efforts.Center for Cell Control (USA)The Center for Cell Control is working to first utilize systems control, with therapeutic intent, todetermine the parameters for guiding the cell to a directed phenotype/genotype which will then befollowed by in depth study, using nanoscale modalities, of the path by which this desired state isachieved. This approach will enable engineering systems that can be applied towards the regulationof a spectrum of cellular functions, such as cancer eradication, controlling viral infection onset, andstem cell differentiation.Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT) (USA)CINT is a Department of Energy/Office of Science Nanoscale Science Research Center (NSRC)operating as a national user facility devoted to establishing the scientific principles that govern thedesign, performance, and integration of nanoscale materials.Center for Material Elaboration & Structural Studies (CEMES) (France)Nanomaterials (electronic, magnetic and optical) fabrication and analysis.Center for Materials Discovery (UK)The Centre for Materials Discovery (CMD) is championing the use of High Throughput (HT)technologies across multiple industrial sectors within Merseyside and the Northwest of England.Competencies include materials synthesis for organic materials, polymers, porous materials,nanomaterials.Center for Nano Manufacturing and Metrology (CNMM) (USA)CNMM is a joint venture between the University of Maryland and the National Institute of Standards andTechnology. Its mission is to advance the science and technology of manufacturing and realization ofproducts based on the use of the unique properties achieved at the nanoscale.Center for NanoEnergetics Research (CNER) (USA)CNER is an Army funded center and exists at four university sites, with the University of Minnesota asthe lead institution.Its mission includes developing new methods for nanoparticle growth and surfacepassivation and developing new Sol-Gel methods for generation of nanostructured materials withemphasis on energy release.Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (USA)The Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a collaborative Page 41

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