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developing_language_skills_listening.ppt

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developing_language_skills_listening.ppt

  1. 1. DEVELOPING LANGUAGE SKILLS
  2. 2. MACRO SKILLS 1. LISTENING 2. READING 3. WRITING 4. SPEAKING
  3. 3. 1. LISTENING
  4. 4. 5 Reasons for listening (Katheleen Galvin , 1989) 1. To engage in social rituals 2. To exchange information 3. To exert control 4. To share feelings 5. To enjoy yourself
  5. 5. Types of Listening Wolvin and Coakley (1992) 1. Informative listening 2. Discriminative Listening 3. Comprehensive Listening 4. Therapeutic Listening 5. Critical Listening and 6. Appreciative Listening.
  6. 6. 1. INFORMATIVE LISTENING  Where your aim is to concentrate on the message being given: directions, instructions
  7. 7. 2. DISCRIMINATIVE LISTENING  Where the listener is able to identify and distinguish inferences or emotions
  8. 8. 3. COMPREHENSIVE LISTENING  Comprehensive listening where the focus is on 'understanding the message'.
  9. 9. 4. EMPHATIC LISTENING  Where the listener tends to listen rather than talk.
  10. 10. 4.THERAPEUTIC LISTENING  is one kind of listening where the listener's role is to be a sympathetic listener without much verbal response
  11. 11. 6. CRITICAL LISTENING  Where the listener may be trying to weigh up whether the speaker is credible.
  12. 12. 7. APPRECIATIVE LISTENING  Where the listener gains pleasure/satisfaction from listening.
  13. 13. Phases of Listening  Pre- listening: Before listening, students need assistance to activate what they already know about the ideas they are going to hear. Simply being told the topic is not enough. Pre- listening activities are required to establish what is already known about the topic, to build necessary background, and to set purpose(s) for listening.
  14. 14. Phases of Listening  While – Listening: Skimming/ scanning Global comprehension" refers to understanding the very general idea(s) or gist of the listening text after the first or second listen. While the students might pick up some details after the first listen, our aim should be to help them focus on the general meaning first, so that they can establish a preliminary framework that will enable them to get more details in the subsequent listens.
  15. 15. Phases of Listening  Post – Listening: A post-listening activity represents a follow up to the listening activity and aims to utilize the knowledge gained from listening for the development of other skills such as speaking or writing
  16. 16. Micro Skills of Listening  1. Predicting what they are going to hear.  2. Listening for gist, ie the general idea, eg by listening for key words (like skimming in reading).  3. Listening for specific information (like scanning in reading).  4. Copying with language which is too fast for them (ex. by listening key words, not panicking and getting stuck when they don't understand, using contextual clues).  5. Copying with unfamiliar words and expressions (ex. by guessing from the context, using visual and/or aural clues).  6. Using the context (using visual and/or aural clues) to increase understanding.  7. Detailed listening.
  17. 17. Three most frequents sub-skills  • Listening for gist. This is when we listen to something to get a general idea of what it’s about, of what’s being said. We don’t want or need to understand every word. Example: listening to a summary of the day’s news on the radio.  • Listening for specific information. This is when we listen to something because we want to discover a particular piece of information. We know in advance what we’re hoping to find out. We can ignore other information which doesn’t interest us. Example: listening to a weather report to find out about the weather in your part of the country.  • Listening in detail. This is when we listen we listen very closely, paying attention to all the words and trying to understand as much information as possible. Example: a member of a jury listening to a statement from a witness.
  18. 18. Task

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