Cultural Food Presentation:
Lebanese Cuisine
Nadine Brown-Winter: 0978213
Caitlin Gepp: 8798222
Sophie Gunn: 8580324
Lebanon
• Location: surrounded by Syria, Israel and the
Mediterranean Sea.
• Population: Approximately 4 million (July
201...
Lebanese culture
• Lebanon was under Arab power from the 8th Century
until the end of World War I
• The French took contro...
Lebanon and Australia
• 74 thousand Lebanese-born residents in
Australia
• 350 thousand claim Lebanese ancestry
• Three ma...
Influences on the Lebanese
Diet: Location
• Small Mediterranean Country of only 10,452km²
• Rugged terrain with very few r...
Influences on the Lebanese
Diet: Culture & Religion
• Eating together as a family is very important in Lebanese culture
• ...
Food Laws in Lebanon
• With 60% of religious people in Lebanon being Muslim,
Halal food laws and regulations are very impo...
Food Laws in Lebanon
• The following food products are not
considered to be Halal and therefore
are Haram (unlawful) and
u...
Meal Traditions
• The tradition of coming
together as a family during
meal times in the Lebanese
culture is extremely
impo...
Types of foods
Traditional to Lebanon
Breads, cereals, rice, pasta, noodles
• Burgal (cooked wheat)
• Dried chickpeas
• Fava beans
• Fasolia beans
• Dry yeast
•...
Fruit
• Lemon
• Melon
• Strawberry
• Pineapple
• Apple
• Pear
• Banana
• Orange
• Pomegranate
Vegetables, legumes
• Cauliflower
• Tomato
• Eggplant
• Potato
• Zucchini
• Onion
• Garlic
• Lebanese cucumber
• Broccoli
Meat, fish ,poultry, eggs, nuts, legumes
• Chicken
• Beef
• Lamb
• Pistachio
• Pecans
• Almond
• egg
Milk, cheese, yoghurt & alternatives
• Ackawi (white cheese)
• Tzatziki (cucumber and yoghurt)
• Shanklish (aged cheese ba...
Essences & Syrups
• Rose water
• Orange blossom water
• Pomegranate molasses
Fats and Oils
• Olive oil
Beverages
• Almaza (beer)
• Arak
• Ayran
• Jallab
• Ksara (famous wine)
• Lebanese wine
• Le caroubie ( non-alcoholic made...
Condiments & Spices
• Mint
• Sumac (spice)
• Zaatar (thyme mix)
• Lebanese 7 spice
• Mistika (Arabic gum)
• Salt and peppe...
Typical Daily Eating
Plan
Breakfast
• Debes mixed with tahina with
pita bread
• Labneh (cheese made from
yoghurt), olive oil, tomatoes,
olives, mint...
Morning Break
• Hummus with pita bread
• Rtayer – pastry filled with
silver
beet, onion, tomatoes, sum
ac and olive oil.
•...
Lunch
• Kebabs
• Falafel, lamb, chicken or
beef with hummus, tabouli
or salad wrapped in
Lebanese bread, pita.
Afternoon Break
• Dried fruit balls
• Zaatar and cheese plate
• Fruit – jujubes (apple-like)
Dinner
• Tabouleh
• Dolmas-stuffed grape
leaves
• Kibbeh- fried lamb balls
• Chickpea salad
• Stuffed zucchini
• Fried cau...
Evening & Other Snacks
• Baklava-pie
• Sunflower seeds
• Puslance turnovers (fatayer
bel-bakleh)
• Zaatar kaak
Comparison of diets
Mediterranean Australian
Conclusion
• Lebanon is a county of diverse geography and religion. It is
essentially urbanized and its cuisine is Mediter...
Reference list
• Al Winn. (2004, ). Come here for cuisine, traditions: LEBANON edition. The Patriot - News, pp. B.01.
• Be...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Cultural food presentation final

5,160 views

Published on

1 Comment
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
No Downloads
Views
Total views
5,160
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
8
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
179
Comments
1
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Cultural food presentation final

  1. 1. Cultural Food Presentation: Lebanese Cuisine Nadine Brown-Winter: 0978213 Caitlin Gepp: 8798222 Sophie Gunn: 8580324
  2. 2. Lebanon • Location: surrounded by Syria, Israel and the Mediterranean Sea. • Population: Approximately 4 million (July 2012) with 87% living in urban regions. • Official language is Arabic • 2 main religions: Muslim-60%, Christian-39% • 17 Religious sects recognised within the Muslim and Christian denominations
  3. 3. Lebanese culture • Lebanon was under Arab power from the 8th Century until the end of World War I • The French took control from this time until Lebanon gained independence in 1943 • Both introduced different cultures and beliefs to Lebanon • ‘Eating in Lebanon is tied to family’ and ‘people almost never eat alone’ (Arwiche 2013) • This is common amongst both the Muslim and Christian populations of Lebanon
  4. 4. Lebanon and Australia • 74 thousand Lebanese-born residents in Australia • 350 thousand claim Lebanese ancestry • Three main waves of Lebanese migration between 1880 and 1975 • The Lebanese population within Australia are most concentrated within the states of NSW and Victoria.
  5. 5. Influences on the Lebanese Diet: Location • Small Mediterranean Country of only 10,452km² • Rugged terrain with very few rivers means only 30% of land mass can support crop production. • Typical Mediterranean climate: mild to cool, wet winters & hot, dry summers. • Not uncommon for Lebanese families to grow their own fruit, vegetables and herbs. • Location of Lebanon has meant that its diet has been influenced by many surrounding countries and cultures over time.
  6. 6. Influences on the Lebanese Diet: Culture & Religion • Eating together as a family is very important in Lebanese culture • Religion has a major impact on how food is prepared as well as what food can/can’t be eaten and when. • It is vital to acknowledge these religious influences which include:  Recognising appropriate food and beverages  Serving a selection of meat and vegetarian foods on separate trays  Providing a variety of non-alcoholic beverages  If religion is Islamic then foods need to be Halal  Islamic tradition does not allow for consumption of alcohol  During Ramadam, Muslims do not eat or drink from break of dawn to sunset  During Lent, Christians eat meatless dishes  Checking individual requirements as some Muslim persons follow a vegetarian diet • Antiochian Orthodox religion provides a fasting calendar which details food items that are to be abstained from and when.
  7. 7. Food Laws in Lebanon • With 60% of religious people in Lebanon being Muslim, Halal food laws and regulations are very important in the Lebanese culture • The laws of Halal are revealed in the Quran from God to Muhammad for all the people. • Halal foods are those that are free from any component that Muslims are prohibited from consuming. • These laws are intended to advance wellness • Halal means permissible and lawful. It applies not only to meat and poultry, but also to other food products, cosmetics, and personal care products (Riaz, Chaundry. 2004).
  8. 8. Food Laws in Lebanon • The following food products are not considered to be Halal and therefore are Haram (unlawful) and unacceptable for Muslims to consume:  Carrion or dead animals  Flowing or congealed blood  Swine, including all by-products  Animals slaughtered without pronouncing the name of God on them  Animals killed in a manner that prevents their blood from being fully drained from their body  Animals slaughtered while pronouncing a name other than God  Intoxicants of all types, including alcohol and drugs  Carnivorous animals with fangs, such as lions, dogs, wolves, or tigers  Birds with sharp claws (birds of prey), such as falcons, eagles, owls, or vultures  Land animals such as frogs or snakes • The rules of Halal food not only applies for Muslims living in Lebanon but is also relevant to Lebanese people who are part of the Islamic religion living in Australia or anywhere else in the world.
  9. 9. Meal Traditions • The tradition of coming together as a family during meal times in the Lebanese culture is extremely important whether the families are part of Christian or Islamic religion. • This tradition remains strong in the Lebanese culture today in contrast to the Australian culture where family meals are becoming less common.
  10. 10. Types of foods Traditional to Lebanon
  11. 11. Breads, cereals, rice, pasta, noodles • Burgal (cooked wheat) • Dried chickpeas • Fava beans • Fasolia beans • Dry yeast • Flour • rice
  12. 12. Fruit • Lemon • Melon • Strawberry • Pineapple • Apple • Pear • Banana • Orange • Pomegranate
  13. 13. Vegetables, legumes • Cauliflower • Tomato • Eggplant • Potato • Zucchini • Onion • Garlic • Lebanese cucumber • Broccoli
  14. 14. Meat, fish ,poultry, eggs, nuts, legumes • Chicken • Beef • Lamb • Pistachio • Pecans • Almond • egg
  15. 15. Milk, cheese, yoghurt & alternatives • Ackawi (white cheese) • Tzatziki (cucumber and yoghurt) • Shanklish (aged cheese balls) • Plain yoghurt • Whole milk • Butter
  16. 16. Essences & Syrups • Rose water • Orange blossom water • Pomegranate molasses
  17. 17. Fats and Oils • Olive oil
  18. 18. Beverages • Almaza (beer) • Arak • Ayran • Jallab • Ksara (famous wine) • Lebanese wine • Le caroubie ( non-alcoholic made from carob) • White coffee • Arabic coffee • Turkish coffee • Tahn
  19. 19. Condiments & Spices • Mint • Sumac (spice) • Zaatar (thyme mix) • Lebanese 7 spice • Mistika (Arabic gum) • Salt and pepper • Parsley • All spice • Garlic paste • Hummus • Labneh (dip) • Tahini paste Labneh Sumac Zaatar (thyme mix) HummusMint Parsley
  20. 20. Typical Daily Eating Plan
  21. 21. Breakfast • Debes mixed with tahina with pita bread • Labneh (cheese made from yoghurt), olive oil, tomatoes, olives, mint and pita bread
  22. 22. Morning Break • Hummus with pita bread • Rtayer – pastry filled with silver beet, onion, tomatoes, sum ac and olive oil. • Tahina and pita bread
  23. 23. Lunch • Kebabs • Falafel, lamb, chicken or beef with hummus, tabouli or salad wrapped in Lebanese bread, pita.
  24. 24. Afternoon Break • Dried fruit balls • Zaatar and cheese plate • Fruit – jujubes (apple-like)
  25. 25. Dinner • Tabouleh • Dolmas-stuffed grape leaves • Kibbeh- fried lamb balls • Chickpea salad • Stuffed zucchini • Fried cauliflower Fried Cauliflower Stuffed ZucchiniChickpea Salad Tabouleh
  26. 26. Evening & Other Snacks • Baklava-pie • Sunflower seeds • Puslance turnovers (fatayer bel-bakleh) • Zaatar kaak
  27. 27. Comparison of diets Mediterranean Australian
  28. 28. Conclusion • Lebanon is a county of diverse geography and religion. It is essentially urbanized and its cuisine is Mediterranean. • Lebanese- born Australians and their descendants have added their own healthy, unique flavours and ingredients to Australian cuisine whilst maintaining their individual tastes from the homeland. • The Lebanese attitude to food is one of “family and togetherness”. • Religious rituals are followed by Muslims and Christians in relation to meal times and types. • Australian climate and infrastructure ensures that the majority of Lebanese food staples are available in Australia or able to be sourced via specialty food stores.
  29. 29. Reference list • Al Winn. (2004, ). Come here for cuisine, traditions: LEBANON edition. The Patriot - News, pp. B.01. • Bee Macguire. (1994, ). International CUISINE ON YOUR DOORSTEP; A taste of lebanon, india and indonesia: FINAL edition. The Gazette, pp. D.1.BRE. • Consulate-General of Lebanon in Melbourne (2013). Lebanese in Australia: Facts and Figures. Retrieved from http://www.lebaneseconsulate.com.au/lebanonOverview/facts.shtml • Countries and Their Cultures (2013)Retrieved from http://www.everyculture.com/Ja-Ma/Lebanon.html#b • Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, Australian Government (2013). Lebanon Country Brief. Retrieved from http://www.dfat.gov.au/geo/lebanon/country_brief.html • Department of Immigration and Citizenship, Australian Government (2013). The Lebanon-born Community. Retrieved from http://www.immi.gov.au/media/publications/statistics/comm-summ/textversion/lebanon.htm • Farah Naja, Lara Nasreddine, Leila Itani, Marie Claire Chamieh, Nada Adra, Abla Mehio Sibai, & Nahla Hwalla. (2011). Dietary patterns and their association with obesity and sociodemographic factors in a national sample of lebanese adults. Public Health Nutrition, 14(9), 1570. doi:10.1017/S136898001100070X • Helou, A. (1996, ). A healthy taste of lebanon: Anissa helou enthuses about the cuisine of her home country: London edition. Financial Times, pp. 15. • Hwalla, N., & Tannous Dit El Khoury D. (2008) Wild-Type Food in Health Promotion and Disease Prevention: The Columbus Concept, Chapter 34: Lebanese Traditional Diets and Health Effects. Retrieved from http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-1-59745-330-1_34 • Iraqi cuisine makes its mark in lebanon's restaurants. (2011, ). Al - Shorfa • Juergensmeyer, M., & Clarke Root, W. (2007). Encyclopaedia of Global Religion. Doi: 10.4135/9781412997898 • Riaz, M.N., & Chaundry, M.M.(2004). Halal Food & Production. Retrieved from http://books.google.com.au/books?ibsn=0203490088 • The Good Shepard: Australian Orthodox Mission (2013). Fasting Calendar. Retrieved from ttp://www.australianorthodox.org.au/fasting-calendar • The World Factbook (2013)Retrieved from https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/ • Western Australian Government (2013). Culture and Religion Information Sheet: Lebanon. Retrieved from http://www.omi.wa.gov.au/resources/publications/cr_diversity/islam.pdf

×