Copyright

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Slides from a lecture on Copyright aimed at FE Students studying music, media, interactive design.

Contact me adam@sonics60.com

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Copyright

  1. 1. Copyright and Intellectual Property
  2. 2.  A work or invention that is a result of creativity.  The ownership of ideas  Owners of IP have rights
  3. 3.  A Patent  Specific product design  A Trademark  Name, phrase, or symbol  A Copyright  Written document or recording
  4. 4.  A legal mechanism  The right to copy  The exclusive right to reproduce and make copies in any form or language, license, and otherwise exploit a literary, musical or artistic work, including derivatives or adaptations; whether printed, or recorded, and perform, display or exhibit in public.
  5. 5.  The first law to protect IP was passed in 1710 and was called The Statute of Anne.  Economic opportunity  Introduce the concept of the creator being the owner of copyright.  Fixed term protection. (14 years, with provision for renewal)
  6. 6.  Copyright Act 1842  Part of the ‘collective title’ Copyright Acts 1734 – 1888.  Term Extension to the length of the authors life plus seven years.  If less than 42 years, it would continue for that amount after death.
  7. 7.  Copyright Act 1882  Part of the ‘collective title’ Copyright Acts 1734 – 1888.  Music works included for the first time.
  8. 8.  Copyright Act 1911  Repealed and consolidated all previous Copyright Acts.  Implemented changes arising from The Berne Convention.  Included sound recordings for the first time.
  9. 9.  Copyright, Designs and Patents Act, 1988  Length of term increased to 70 years after the death of the creator.  If the creator is unknown, 70 years after the work was first published  50 years for sound recordings and computer programs.
  10. 10.        Musical compositions/Arrangements (70 years) Lyrics (70 years) Sound Recordings (50 Years) Music Videos (70 Years) Artwork (70 years) Computer Programs/Apps (50 years) Websites (Discuss)
  11. 11.  Your work is yours as long as you can prove it.  Keep as much background work as possible.  In software – leave footprints.  In digital files – embed meta data  Register with the UK Copyright Service.
  12. 12.  Mechanical License  Public Performance License  Synchronisation License  Print License  Digital Performance Right in Sound Recordings
  13. 13.  Collection Agencies  PRS for Music (Performing Rights Society) ▪ MCPS/PRS Alliance (Mechanical Copyright Protection Society)  PPL (Phonographic Performance Ltd)  VPL (Video Performance Ltd)
  14. 14.  The musical composition.  The Lyrics.  Recordings.  Any original artwork.
  15. 15.      What share of royalties will each member receive? How will the income be divided if a band member leaves or joins? How will the income be divided if the band splits up? Who has the right to use the band name? Who’s responsible?
  16. 16.  Contracts  Legal Advice  Search the web for ‘Band Agreement’ examples
  17. 17.  www.copyrightservice.co.uk  www.ipo.gov.uk  www.prsformusic.com  www.ppluk.com

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