"Everybody is a Somebody" A Dialogue on Classism in Cooperative Extension

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"Everybody is a Somebody" A Dialogue on Classism in Cooperative Extension

  1. 1. Title Date XX, XXXX “Everybody is a Somebody”… A Dialogue on Classism in Cooperative Extension Liz Hilts, Western District Program Associate Deb Jones, Western District Director October 21, 2010
  2. 2. CE Values…Inclusiveness We recognize, appreciate and honor the differences, similarities and contributions of all people and communities. We are intentional in our efforts to ensure equity, justice and fairness. We embrace new ideas and approaches in our work.
  3. 3. Robert Fuller in Somebodies and Nobodies (2003) suggests that rank divides us into "somebodies" and "nobodies." More than most care to admit, we treat others--and are treated by others--based on our relative rank. The truth is that each of us has felt like a somebody some times and a nobody at others. A key to feeling like a somebody is being recognized by others. Without recognition from others, we may feel discounted, disconnected, marginal, or even invisible. Somebodies and Nobodies
  4. 4. Somebodies and Nobodies
  5. 5. •Contribute your thinking •Speak with your mind and your heart •Listen together for deeper insights and understanding •All perspectives will be respected •After the session, we can share what we said…not what others said Ground rules
  6. 6. •Think about the people you work with daily. •Draw a diagram of your work team and how they relate to each other •Draw the team as it “feels” to you…NOT as it may appear on the organizational chart. •Some examples… Let’s Get Started…
  7. 7. Example 1 Dept Head Ag Agent 4-H YD Agent “Our secretary” FL Agent “My secretary” Open loop
  8. 8. Example 2 Educator Support Staff EducatorIntern VISTA Closed loop
  9. 9. Example 3 Doin’ my own thing Just started…don’t know what I’m doing Don’t care what anyone else is doing Out in the field…never in the office Send help Anothersomeone Need help Someone No loop!!
  10. 10. Sharing and Discussion
  11. 11. Nobodies Feel… • Overlooked • Discouraged • Disrespected • Excluded • Demeaned • Shamed • Less-than-zero
  12. 12. Somebodies Feel… • Noticed • Encouraged • Welcomed • Appreciated • Respected • Included • Esteemed • Loved
  13. 13. I feel like a “nobody” when…
  14. 14. I feel like a “somebody”… • Participate as a resource and assistant with all colleagues • Attend meetings and share ideas as an equal contributor • Part of marketing initiative and movement • Part of internship recruitment • New Orleans Cultural Immersion participant • My ideas are important for what I contribute; not based on rank.
  15. 15. I Feel Like a Nobody When… I Feel Like a Somebody When…
  16. 16. Organizational Culture • Organizational silence is a barrier that occurs when individuals or groups feel compelled to remain silent in the face of issues, problems or concerns. Organizations lose vital information necessary for making change. • Some work place cultures retard innovation by focusing on the way things have always been done.
  17. 17. • Have you ever been in a situation where you have remained silent even though you had information important for the decision or problem? • What contributed to your silence?
  18. 18. How are we doing in CE? • Small group discussion: – Things we do well – Barriers to inclusion • Large group sharing
  19. 19. Western District Examples • Terminology: – Never “academic staff”; “faculty” – “Educators” – Colleagues • All colleagues in the office participate in Civil Rights Days • County support staff are recognized on birthdays, Administrative Professional Day, and with an annual in-service • Recognize office teams at district meetings
  20. 20. Where do we go from here? • Everyone has a role and shares responsibility • Difficult conversations – They are more about US than THEM – It’s the RIGHT thing to do – Change is not created without dialogue
  21. 21. Where do we go from here?
  22. 22. To really comprehend rankism, we must be changemakers.
  23. 23. "Inclusion is a process of identifying, understanding and breaking down barriers to participation and belonging.“ Author Unknown
  24. 24. Title Date XX, XXXX “Everybody is a Somebody”… A Dialogue on Classism in Cooperative Extension Liz Hilts, Western District Program Associate Deb Jones, Western District Director October 21, 2010

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