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Dryden’s Comparative Criticism Of Ben Jonson.

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Dryden’s Comparative Criticism Of Ben Jonson.

  1. 1. • • • • Name : Pratiksha M Solanki Roll No : 26 Sem : 1 (2013-2015) Paper : Literary Theory and Criticism. • Subject : Dryden's Comparative Criticism of Ben Jonson. • Submitted to : Smt. S.B. Gardi Dept. of English M.K.Bhavnagar University
  2. 2. Brief Introduction : John Dryden John Dryden (1631-1700) greatest English poet of the seventeenth century. He was an English poet, Dramatist, Literary Critic, Translator.
  3. 3. An Essay of Dramatic Poesy
  4. 4. An Essay of Dramatic Poesy In 1668 : He wrote his most important prose work, Of Dramatick Poesie, an Essay. Dryden’s own defense of his literary practices. • The four gentlemen, Eugenius, Crites, Lisideius, and Neander begin an ironic and witty conversation on the subject of poetry, which soon turns into a debate on the virtues of modern and ancient writers.
  5. 5.  Ben Jonson  Ben Jonson ( 11 June 1572, 6 August 1637 ) was a Jacobean playwright, poet, and literary critic, of the seventeenth century.
  6. 6. Comparative Criticism of Ben Jonson • Dryden's observation on Ben Jonson. • " As for Jonson, I think he was the most learned and judicious writer which any Theater ever had. He was a most severe Judge of himself as well as others. He managed his strength to more advantage then any who preceded him."
  7. 7. • Humour was his proper sphere, and in that he delighted most to represent Mechanick people. • He invades Authours like a Monarch, and what would be theft in other poets, is onely victory in him. • Fault in his language : In his play he did a little to much to Romanize our Tongue. Leaving the words which he translated almost as much Latine as he found them.
  8. 8.  Every Man in His Humour

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