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5G Spectrum in EUROPE

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5G Spectrum in EUROPE

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5G Spectrum in EUROPE

  1. 1. ©  2016  Global  mobile  Suppliers  Associa6on     1   5G  SPECTRUM  IN  EUROPE   GSA  spectrum  group   December  2016     www.gsacom.com  
  2. 2. © 2015 Global mobile Suppliers Association 2 This presentation outlines the agreed views on 5G Spectrum from the GSA Spectrum Group European regional (CEPT) team GSA is a global supplier association and the Spectrum Group has a global mandate to deliver spectrum messaging on behalf of its members. This presentation is a European position on 5G spectrum and may not represent the position with other regions About the GSA Spectrum Group: The Spectrum Group within GSA is the GSA focus group for global policy matters related to the radio frequency spectrum and radio regulatory matters pertaining to the successful evolution of International Mobile Telecommunication (IMT) of ITU and associated administrative, operational and technical aspects. GSA SPECTRUM GROUP
  3. 3. © 2015 Global mobile Suppliers Association 3 EUROPE’S  5G  PIONEER  BANDS  AND  ACTION  PLAN   ! 2018   Trials   2020   Commercial     (1  major  city   per  country)   2025   Seamless  coverage   (all  major  ci6es,   transport  paths)   2016   Pioneer   Bands  (*)   2017   Extended  set  of   Bands  (**)   Japan   Summer  Olympics    (Jul  ‘20)   Korea   Winter  Olympics     (Feb  ‘18)   Spectrum  selecLon   China     Product  R&D    trials   (2018-­‐2020)   FCC  rules  for  28,  37  and   39  GHz  bands   (Jul  ‘15)   Common  Lmelines  “5G  AcLon  Plan”   &    “5G  spectrum   roadmap”   700  MHz   3400-­‐3800  MHz   24.25  –  27.5  GHz   2019   (*)  “Radio  Spectrum  Policy  Group  strategic  roadmap  towards  5G  for  Europe  –  Opinion  on  spectrum  related  aspects  for  next  genera6on  wireless  systems  (5G)   (**)  Supplementary  Opinion  from  RSPG  
  4. 4. ©  2016  Global  mobile  Suppliers  Associa6on     4   •  Low  frequencies   •  Full  area  coverage  allowing  cost  effec6ve  delivery  of  mobile  services   •  Bandwidths  considerably  wider  (in  the  order  of  100s  of  MHz)  than  those  of  today,      providing  a  combina6on  of  capacity  and  coverage   •  New  bands  below  6GHz  should  be  made  available  for  5G   •  High  frequencies   •  Needed  for  applica6ons  requiring  very  high  data  rates   •  Will  accommodate  wider  channel  bandwidths  (e.g.  up  to  1GHz  per  MNO)      within  a  coverage  area  that  can  reach  several  100s  meters  in  outdoors   •  PropagaLon  characterisLcs  may  facilitate  sharing  with  exis6ng  services   5G  NEEDS  SPECTRUM  LOW  AND  HIGH  FREQUENCIES   Higher  and  lower  frequencies  are  both  needed  to  meet  all  mul6ple  5G  use  cases   10   50  40  30  20   60   80  70  1   5  4  2   6  3   Low  frequencies   GHz   In scope of WRC-19, allocated to Mobile Service already In scope of WRC-19, may require allocation to Mobile Service In scope of previous WRCs High  frequencies  
  5. 5. ©  2016  Global  mobile  Suppliers  Associa6on     5   eMBB   Enhanced  Mobile  Broadband   mMTC   Massive  Machine  Type     Communica6ons   URLLC   Ultra-­‐reliable  and     Low  Latency  Communica6ons   3D  video,   UHD  screens   Smart   City   Industry  automaLon   Gigabytes  in   a  second   Self  Driving   Car   Augmented   reality   Smart   Home  /   Building   Work  &  play   in  the  cloud   Voice   Mission  criLcal  applicaLon   Future  IMT   Low  frequencies   with  wide  bandwidth   100  Mbps  user  experience  anywhere   E.g.  3400-­‐3800  MHz   High  frequency     with  very  wide  bandwidth   For  very  high  end  user  peak  data  rate:  20  Gbps   E.g.  24.25-­‐27.5  (pioneer)  and  37-­‐43.5  GHz Low  frequencies   with  good  coverage   wide  and  deep  coverage,   massive  IoT  connecMons   E.g.  700,  3400-­‐3800  MHz Low  frequencies   For  wide  reliable  coverage   E.g.  700,  3400-­‐3800  MHz All  exis6ng  IMT  frequency  bands  should  be  ready  for  5G     based  on  market  demand  on  a  technology  and  service  neutral  basis   EXAMPLE  MAPPING  OF  RSPG  PIONEER  BANDS  WITH  5G  USE  CASES  
  6. 6. ©  2016  Global  mobile  Suppliers  Associa6on     6   C-­‐BAND:  FIRST  5G  BAND  GLOBALLY Available for IMT / offical plans Under discussion for IMT Japan:  inves6ga6ons  on  the  promising  bands  for  5G  including  e.g.   3600-­‐4200  MHz,  4400-­‐4900  MHz,  MNOs  considering  these  bands   for  5G  amongst  others   •  Targeting at least 300-400 MHz contiguous bandwidth in most countries! •  Enabling around 100 MHz of contiguous spectrum per MNO (within the 3400-3800 MHz range)! •  Refarming and auctions under consideration in a number of European countries! GHz 4.5 4.8 4.9 4.4 3.4 3.6 3.8 4.2 5.0 China    ongoing  5G  technology  trial  in  the  3400-­‐3600  MHz   band.  MNOs  considering  3300-­‐3600  MHz  for  5G   Korea:  3400-­‐3700  MHz  band  is  a  good  candidate  for  5G   USA:  further  studies  proposed  for  a  number  of  bands  including   3100-­‐3550  MHz  and  3700-­‐4200  MHz  (in  addi6on  to  3550-­‐3700   MHz  already  being  opened  for  mobile  use)  
  7. 7. ©  2016  Global  mobile  Suppliers  Associa6on     7   C-­‐BAND:  LARGER  BLOCKS  NEEDED  FOR  5G     •  C-Band spectrum is fragmented across Europe: ! –  paired assignments (but used for TDD rollout)! –  some FS and FSS incumbents still remain! –  multiple regional / local assignments, many with expiry dates after the year 2021! •  Target:! –  Around 100 MHz of contiguous spectrum per MNO within the 3400-3800 MHz range! –  Up to 200MHz / MNO within the 3400-4200 MHz range! Number  of  individual  usage  rights  across  Europe   •   Regional  licenses   FIN (*) FR GER IT (*) SWE UK Source:  www.efis.dk/ views2/report03.jsp  -­‐   Oct  ’16  and  Huawei   **  Auc6on  under   planning     Current  fragmentaLon  in  the  3400-­‐3800  MHz  band  requires     acLon  to  enable  5G  by  2020.              (**)   3400 3500 36003410 3420 3430 3440 3450 3460 3470 3480 3490 3510 3520 3530 3540 3550 3560 3570 3580 3590 (*)   (*)   (*)   (*)   (*)   (*)              (**)  
  8. 8. ©  2016  Global  mobile  Suppliers  Associa6on     8     •  700  MHz   •  The  common  schedule  for  the  band  availability  by  2020  is  important   •  The  band  may  deliver  important  benefits  to  5G,  no6ng  that  LTE  rollouts  will  start  before  2020  in  some   European  countries   •  470-­‐694  MHz  (longer  term)   •  IMT  iden6fica6on  in  a  number  of  countries  (at  WRC-­‐15)   •  Region  2:  470-­‐608  &  614-­‐698  MHz:  Bahamas,  Barbados,  Canada,  Mexico,  U.S.;    614-­‐698  MHz:  Belize,  Colombia;      Incen6ve  auc6on  already  in  progress  in  the  US   •  Region  3:  470-­‐698  MHz:  Micronesia,  Solomon,  Tuvalu,  Vanuatu;    610-­‐698  MHz:  Bangladesh,  Maldives,  New  Zealand   •  Added  to  the  preliminary  agenda  for  WRC-­‐23  for  Region  1:  Europe  should  develop  its  posi6on  for   WRC-­‐19  (when  the  Agenda  Item  descrip6on  will  be  finalized)   UHF:  FOR  WIDE  AND  DEEP  COVERAGE   Spectrum  below  1GHz  can  cost  effec6vely  address  5G  use  cases  requiring  smaller   bandwidth  and  good  coverage  (e.g.  IoT  5G  use  case)        
  9. 9. ©  2016  Global  mobile  Suppliers  Associa6on     9   •  Propaga6on  models  and  5G  parameters  are  being  defined  to  support  sharing  studies   •  Spectrum  needs  for  IMT  and  compa6bility  with  other  services  are  being  analyzed   WRC-­‐19 24.25 GHz 31.8 33.4 37.0 43.5 45.5 47.047.2 27.5 3.5 42.5 40.5 42.5 1.5 3.0 50.2 52.6 50.4 2.2 66 76 81 86 5 5 71 5 In scope of WRC-19, allocated to Mobile Service already In scope of WRC-19, may require allocation to Mobile Service 3.25 2 1.6 •  Bands  between  24.25  GHz  and  86  GHz  are  being  studied  for  WRC-­‐19  (Agenda  Item  1.13)  
  10. 10. ©  2016  Global  mobile  Suppliers  Associa6on     10   26GHZ  (PIONEER)  AND  40GHZ 3  GHz   3.25  GHz 6.5  GHz     1.6  GHz 3  GHz 2  GHz   3  GHz   0.85  GHz   The 24.25-29.5 & 37-43.5 GHz are the most promising bands for early 5G global commercialization 3.25  GHz   (agreed  pioneer) 24.25 27.5 29.5 31.8 33.4 37 40.5 42.5 43.5 GHz   U.S.  has  the  bands  27.5-­‐28.35,  37-­‐38.6,  38.6-­‐40  GHz  for   licensed  use,  the  band  64-­‐71GHz  for  unlicensed  use   Korea:  has  decided  26.5-­‐29.5  GHz   for  5G  trial   Japan  is  inves6ga6ng  the  promising  bands  for  5G   including  28GHz   Confirmed   Likely   TBD   Global primary MS band Non-global primary MS band Non AI1.13 band China  is  conduc6ng  compa6bility  studies   for  the  26  and  40  GHz  bands   Europe’s  5G  pioneer  band  and   other  bands  considered  for  5G  
  11. 11. ©  2016  Global  mobile  Suppliers  Associa6on     11   •  Adequate  economies    of  scale  for  cost  effec6ve  solu6ons  for  end  users   •  Global  roaming  for  end  user  devices   •  Reduced  efforts  in  cross  border  coordina6on   •  Reduced  equipment  design  complexity,  preserving  baoery  life,  and  improving  efficiency   in  spectrum  use     •  There  may  be  new  challenges  in  the  terminal  implementa6on  to  support  mul6ple    non-­‐con6guous  bands  (above  6GHz)  in  the  same  device  –  especially  in  the  ini6al  stage     SPECTRUM  HARMONIZATION  AT  HIGH  FREQUENCIES   Spectrum  harmoniza6on  remains  important  for  the  development  of  IMT  as  it  allows  for:       Spectrum  harmonizaLon  is  even  more  important  for  higher  frequencies   in  order  to  support  the  development  of  the  new  ecosystem.  
  12. 12. ©  2016  Global  mobile  Suppliers  Associa6on     12   •  Feasibility  and  6me  availability  of  tuning  ranges  are  impacted  by  various  factors  inlcuding  the  required  width   and  the  compa6bility  and  sharing  requirements  for  exis6ng  services   •  Early  access  to  the  28  GHz  band  is  driving  the  development  of  the  first  5G  infrastructure  and  devices  for  early   trials  and  deployments  in  2017/2018   •  The  implementa6on  of  this  band  is  further  supported  by  the  upcoming    5G  trials  in  Korea  (see  slide  5)  where  the  26.5-­‐29.5  GHz  range  will  be  used    (resul6ng  in  an  overlap  of  1GHz)   •  Other  op6ons  are  presented  in  the  next  slide   ‘Tuning  range’  approach  allows  to  benefit  from  early  developments  in  other  Regions,   maximizing  economies  of  scale  and  reducing  fragmenta6on  of  spectrum   26GHZ  (24.25  –  27.5  GHZ)   The  24.25  –  29.5  GHz  tuning  range  allows  Europe  to  benefit     from  early  ecosystem  being  developed  for  the  28  GHz  band  in  other  Regions.   24.25 - 27.5 (3.25) 27.5 - 29.5 (2.0) “25+28”  tuning  range 19%
  13. 13. ©  2016  Global  mobile  Suppliers  Associa6on     13   TUNING  RANGES  –  FOR  FURTHER  DISCUSSION   (*)    RR  5.340:  “all  emissions  are  prohibited  in  the  following   bands:  31.3-­‐31.5  GHz  (R1,2,3),  31.5-­‐31.8  GHz  (R2)”   26.5 / 27.5 - 29.5 (3.0 / 2.0) Passive Services (*) 31.8 - 33.4 (1.6) “28+32”  tuning  range 23% •  31.8  –  33.4  GHz  supported  for  studies  towards  WRC-­‐19  by   all  regions  at  WRC-­‐15   •  The  size  of  the  poten6ally  available  bandwidth  (1.6GHz)     could  be  limited  by  the  fact  that  “all  emissions  are   prohibited”  in  adjacent  passive  band    31.5-­‐31.8  GHz   19% 37 - 39.5 (2.5) 39.5 - 41.5 (2.0) 41.5 - 43.5 (2.0) “38+42”  tuning  range 16% •  In  line  with  the  wide  support  during  the  WRC-­‐15,  different   por6ons  of  spectrum  within  the  37.0  –  43.5  GHz  range  are   now  being  considered  for  5G  in  various  regions,      e.g.:   •  37  –  40  GHz  already  decided  in  the  USA   •  40.5  –  43.5  GHz  in  Europe       The  applica6on  of  tuning  range  concept     to  the  28+32  GHz  bands  is  not  a  viable  op6on.  
  14. 14. ©  2016  Global  mobile  Suppliers  Associa6on     14   •  Higher  signal  propaga6on  fading     •  Typical  deployments  will  address  capacity  enhancements  in  hotspot  and  indoor  scenarios   •  Low  frequencies  will  ensure  seamless  coverage   •  Urban  and  suburban  outdoor  small  cell  deployment   •  Below  roosop  antenna  in  urban  areas  has  large  cluoer  loss   •  Lower  transmioer  power  than  in  Macro  cells   •  Indoor  deployment   •  Higher  building  entry  loss  reduces  the  indoor  IMT  opera6on  risk  to  interfere  other  users  in  outdoors   •  Narrow  beams   •  Only  covering  small  areas,  e.g.  tens  of  meters   •  Limi6ng  the  signal  power  to  the  unwanted  direc6ons   Sharing  with  IMT-­‐2020  at  higher  frequencies:   NEW  SHARING  OPPORTUNITIES   The  satellite  and  mobile  industries  both  rely  on  efficient  use  of  scarce  spectrum  to  ensure  conLnued  growth.   It  is  important  to  establish  adequate  protecLon  (not  over-­‐protecLon)  for  satellite  systems:     spectrum  sharing  must  be  discussed  on  realisLc  terms.   GSA  encourages  efforts  to  improve  the  mutual  understanding.   typical h = 30 m typical h < 10 m Ver6cal angular discrimination mitigates interference Dense Urban area IMT base station
  15. 15. ©  2016  Global  mobile  Suppliers  Associa6on     15   •  Europe  should  ac6vely  promote  5G  deployments  in  the  700  and  3400-­‐3800    MHz  bands  by  2020   •  700  MHz   •  The  band  may  deliver  important  benefits  to  5G,  no6ng  that  LTE  rollouts  will  start  before  2020  in  some  European  countries   •  3400-­‐3800  MHz     •  Ensure  a  suitable  regulatory  framework  for  5G   •  Address  current  fragmenta6on  to  enable  around  100  MHz  of  con6guous  spectrum  per  MNO   •  Clearing  of  the  band  from  incumbent  users  (development  of  sharing  frameworks  when  required)   •  Auc6on  rules  to  incen6vize  largest  con6guous  assignments   •  For  the  longer  term,  Europe  should  further  inves6gate  new  spectrum  possibili6es:   •  3800-­‐4200  MHz   •  It  can  further  extend  the  3400-­‐3800  MHz  range  allowing  up  to  200  MHz  per  MNO,  on  a  shared  basis  where  needed   •  470-­‐694  MHz   •  To  increase  the  availability  of  spectrum  with  good  coverage   •  More  long  term  deployment  in  Europe   GSA  VIEWS  ON  THE  KEY  NEXT  STEPS  (1/2)   Low  frequency  spectrum  will  be  essen6al  for  5G    
  16. 16. ©  2016  Global  mobile  Suppliers  Associa6on     16   •  26GHz   •  Europe  (CEPT)  will  develop  a  harmoniza6on  decision,  before  the  WRC-­‐19,  setng  the  condi6ons  for  the  introduc6on  of  5G  in   the  26  GHz  band   •  Condi6ons  should  take  into  account  protec6on  (not  over-­‐protec6on)  of  exis6ng  services  in  the  same  and  adjacent  frequency   bands  (e.g.  EESS  /  SRS  earth  sta6ons)   •  40GHz   •  In  addi6on,  within  the  prepara6on  for  WRC-­‐19,  CEPT  will  kick  off  studies  addressing  sharing  in  the  40GHz  bands,   •  The  engagement  within  Region  1  and  with  other  Regions  is  important  to  ensure  that  Europe’s  5G  bands  will  rely   on  widest  economies  of  scale.   GSA  VIEWS  ON  THE  KEY  NEXT  STEPS  (2/2)   High  frequency  with  very  wide  bandwidth  will  be  needed  to  address  very  high  end  user  peak  data  rate:  ~20  Gbps   10   50  40  30  20   60   80  70  1   5  4  2   6  3   Low  frequencies   GHz   High  frequencies   In scope of WRC-19 Additional options European 5G pioneer bands
  17. 17. ©  2016  Global  mobile  Suppliers  Associa6on     17   •  28  GHz  trials  in  the  United  States  by  Verizon  and  AT&T.  Verizon  announced  commercial  launch   in  2017.  AT&T  also  looking  at  trials  in  3.5  GHz  and  15  GHz.   •  28  GHz  trials  in  South  Korea  in  6me  for  the  2018  Olympics  with  SK,  KT  and  LG  U+  using  1  GHz   of  spectrum  per  operator.   •  Early  system  trials  planned  in  Japan  for  3600-­‐4100  MHz,  4405-­‐4895  MHz  and  27.5-­‐28.28  GHz,   star6ng  2017  in  Tokyo,  and  con6nuing  as  a  larger-­‐scale  field  trial  through  2018  and  2019.   •  The  IMT-­‐2020  Promo6on  Group  of  China  has  announced  the  ongoing  5G  technology  trial  in  the   3400-­‐3600  MHz  band.  In  addi6on,  the  bands  3300  –  3400  MHz,  4400  –  4500  MHz,  4800  –  4990   MHz,  25  GHz  and  40  GHz  are  being  considered  for  5G  use.   •  In  Russia  operator  Megafon  intends  to  run  a  5G  network  in  2018  (in  6me  for  FIFA  World  Cup).   •  In  Sweden  Telia  Company  is  conduc6ng  field  trials  in  the  Stockholm  area  and  plans  to  bring  5G   experience  to  customers  in  Stockholm  and  Tallinn  in  2018.     •  The  European  Commission  recently  published  their  5G  Ac6on  Plan  with  preliminary  trials  from   2017   onwards,   and   pre-­‐commercial   trials   from   2018.   Likely   bands   are   3400-­‐3800   MHz   and   24.25-­‐27.5  GHz  (see  pioneer  band  discussion)   •  and  many  more  …   EXAMPLES  OF  RECENT  TRIAL  ACTIVITIES   Many  trials  ongoing  &  planned  around  the  world  mainly  in  3.5  GHz,  4.5  GHz  and  28  GHz  
  18. 18. ©  2016  Global  mobile  Suppliers  Associa6on     18   Promo6ng  the  Mobile  Broadband  Technology  Roadmap   Global  mobile  Suppliers  Associa6on  
  19. 19. ©  2016  Global  mobile  Suppliers  Associa6on     19   BACKUP  
  20. 20. ©  2016  Global  mobile  Suppliers  Associa6on     20   •  The  assignment  of  exclusive  spectrum  usage  rights  (i.e.  “licensed  spectrum”)  will   remain  of  central  importance  also  for  5G  as  key  enabler  for:   •  Mission  cri6cal  applica6ons   •  Low  latency  applica6ons   •  Guaranteed  Quality  of  Experience  (QoE)  to  end  users   •  Shared  spectrum  access  schemes  (e.g.  License  Shared  Access)  could  be  considered  as  a   complementary  op6on  if  the  band  cannot  be  cleared   •  While  defining  sharing  frameworks  to  protect  an  incumbent  services  in  a  certain  band,  Administra6ons   need  to  find  the  appropriate  trade-­‐off  between  the  complexity  of  the  framework,  degree  of  spectrum  use   and  QoS  to  be  assured  for  end  users  and  6me  to  market   SPECTRUM  ACCESS  SCHEMES   NOTE:  to  be  shown  “when  needed”   depending  on  the  audience  
  21. 21. ©  2016  Global  mobile  Suppliers  Associa6on     21   SPECTRUM  SHARING  EXAMPLE  3.8-­‐4.2  GHZ   Targe6ng  protec6on  of  incumbent  users  AND  maximized  spectrum  u6liza6on   FSS   Earth  StaLon  IMT   heterogeneous  networks   Ubiquitous  /  specific   FSS  Earth  StaLons   outside  of  urban  areas   “Buffer  zone”   (exclusion  /  restricLon  /   protecLon  zone)   IMT  Macro  +  Small  Cell   In  urban  areas   NOTE:  to  be  shown  “when  needed”   depending  on  the  audience  
  22. 22. ©  2016  Global  mobile  Suppliers  Associa6on     22   IMPLEMENTATION  OF  BANDS  FROM    WRC-­‐12  AND  WRC-­‐15   1800   ”Core”  2000   2300   ”Extension”  2600   450   900   3400   3600   3800   “PCS”  1900   850   “AWS”   “AWS”   <  1  GHz   1  -­‐  3  GHz   3  -­‐  5  GHz   800   700   2600   850    900  700   4200   4800   4990  3300   3700   Americas       Asia-­‐Pacific   700   600   600  450   450   “L-­‐band”   2300   2000   Africa,  Asia-­‐Pacific,  Europe,  Middle  East       “L-­‐band”   Americas     Africa  (*),  Europe,  Middle  East   WRC-­‐23   (*)  The  band  850  MHz  is  used  in  some  countries  in  Africac                     Implemented  /  discussed  at  na6onal  /  regional  level   Unit:  MHz   IMT  iden6fica6on  in  the  ITU-­‐R  Radio  Regula6ons  (before  WRC-­‐ IMT  iden6fica6on  in  the  ITU-­‐R  Radio  Regula6ons  (WRC-­‐15)   No  IMT  iden6fica6on  

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