Cul respteachingsum11 2jiang

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  • The primary focus of this training is to encourage teachers to develop an understanding of African American culture and to develop effective strategies for teaching African American stu-dents to enhance learning with the ultimate goal of improving student achievement. Therefore, Social Cognitive Theory is the basis for change in this professional learning program.
  • The primary focus of this training is to encourage teachers to develop an understanding of African American culture and to develop effective strategies for teaching African American stu-dents to enhance learning with the ultimate goal of improving student achievement. Therefore, Social Cognitive Theory is the basis for change in this professional learning program.
  • The primary focus of this training is to encourage teachers to develop an understanding of African American culture and to develop effective strategies for teaching African American stu-dents to enhance learning with the ultimate goal of improving student achievement. Therefore, Social Cognitive Theory is the basis for change in this professional learning program.
  • Cul respteachingsum11 2jiang

    1. 1. Teachers’ Expectations in Response to Demographic Changes<br />Presented by: Whitney Bailely, Tiffany Proctor and Starla Townsend<br />
    2. 2. Context<br />This research project will examine the challenges classroom teachers face, and then provide strategies for various types of educational settings as it relates to students’: behavior, communication and attitudes, and academic accountability. Individual plans of actions will also be developed based on appropriateness for our current teaching environments. <br />
    3. 3. Rationale<br /><ul><li>African Americans make up 12 percent of the national population, yet represent 42 percent of all students attending public schools (U.S. Department of Education, 2011).
    4. 4. Of all minority groups represented in public education, African American students have a higher incidence rate of not completing or dropping out of high school.
    5. 5. Many researchers believe there is a relationship between African American culture and academic performance. </li></ul>(Teachers of Color, 2011). <br />
    6. 6. Rationale<br />70% high school teachers polled indicated that a large percentage of their African American students showed little to no interest in their class work and were often times disrupted class with inappropriate behavior (Teachers of Color, 2011). <br />Educators are rightly concerned about this trend<br />Immediate intervention is necessary to slow and eventually stop the progression of illiteracy, poor academic achievement<br />
    7. 7. What Can We Do?<br />Cultural/Diversity Training for all educators <br />Specifically training concerning differences in African American culture and learning style<br /> The Pittsburg Research project analysis suggests 10 years of continuous professional support, including collaborative study, observation, and knowledge of curricula, before a teacher can truly learn how to differentiate teaching styles and strategies to impact student learning (Teachers of Color, 2011).<br />
    8. 8. Research Questions<br /><ul><li>What impact does diversity have in the achievement of African American students?
    9. 9. Cultural
    10. 10. Socio-economic differences
    11. 11. What training is currently available that exposes teachers to diversity issues among their students?
    12. 12. Limited formal training
    13. 13. What are the most common issues for teachers as it relates to the academic achievement of the African American student?
    14. 14. Lack of Interest
    15. 15. Authority</li></li></ul><li>Action Plans<br />The Action Plans presented will address the needs of three different schools facing a similar problem. The plans target the development of faculty and staff through professional learning and encourages culturally responsive instructional practices to build and support meaningful student relationships.<br />
    16. 16. Action Plan for East Paulding High School<br />
    17. 17. School Demographics<br />
    18. 18. Change in Student Demographics<br />
    19. 19. Theory of Change<br />Social Cognitive Theory<br />Process of knowledge acquisition or learning, directly correlated to the observation of models<br />This theory proposes that learning takes place through experiences, human dialogue and interaction, and observation (Schunk, 2008) <br />
    20. 20. Culturally Responsive Education Professional Learning Program<br />Three Year Program<br />Teachers <br />Parents and Students<br />Educational Community, feeder schools<br />Pre- and Post- Culturally Responsive survey<br />Lunch and Learn Groups<br />Courageous Conversations<br />Faculty Blog/Wiki<br />Authentic Learning Opportunities<br />Administration Observations<br />End of the Year Poster Session of Culturally Responsive Education<br />
    21. 21. Culturally Responsive Education Professional Learning<br />Artifacts will be collected from the professional learning program, including pertinent information from the “Faculty Wiki”<br />A formal report and handbook will be disseminated to be used by the leadership team for planning the next phase of the Cultural Responsive Education Workshop<br />Analysis of the pre- and post-training survey which will inform of changes in teacher practices, perceptions and behaviors.<br />
    22. 22. Woodland High School Demograpics<br />1,797 students<br />White: 80.9%<br />Black: 9.5%<br />Hispanic: 6.8%<br />Multiracial: 1.2%<br />Females: 49%<br />Males: 51%<br />Free & Reduced Lunch: 40.4%<br />Special Ed: 12.2%<br />ELL: 2.6%<br />
    23. 23. WHS Changing Demographics<br />
    24. 24. WHS Goals 2011<br />1) All departments will show measurable improvement for each sub‐group. Based on high‐stakes testing, all core areas will meet or exceed state averages.<br />2) In order to improve student attendance, the number of students missing 10 or more days will decrease.<br />3) The graduation rate will increase from 85% to 87%.<br />
    25. 25. Current Professional Development<br />Motivating Students<br />New Teacher Orientations<br />“The Wildcat Way”<br />Department Meetings<br />Lunch Meetings<br />C.A.T.S. Meetings<br />Curriculum Alignment/Vertical Training<br />Guest Speakers (Closing the Achievement Gap)<br />Better Seeker Team<br />***No intercultural professional development!<br />
    26. 26. What should we do?<br />Implement a professional development plan to increase cultural awareness among teachers. <br />Plan includes 4 “Meet & Eat” sessions<br />Once a week for a month<br />Every Friday<br />Include free pizza<br />“A meeting of the minds”- Teacher driven<br />Discuss successful strategies/theories<br />Create a handbook which can be used in the future for a reference.<br />Repeat annually<br />
    27. 27. Action Plan for Cascade Elementary School<br />Goal <br />To increase the awareness and application of culturally responsive teaching of the faculty and staff through professional learning activities.<br />Reality<br />The majority of teachers and students at Cascade Elementary School are black.<br />Many differences exist due to socio-economic backgrounds and experiences.<br />
    28. 28. “Book Talks” Delivery Model<br />Occur over 1 month with weekly Wednesday talks<br />Begin with a presentation on culturally relevant teaching / question and answer session<br />Complete a self-assessment on cultural beliefs and practices<br />Weekly assignments and discussions based on the 3 critical aspects for culturally responsive teaching presented in Gloria Ladson-Billings (2009) The Dream Keepers<br />
    29. 29. The Dream-Keepers<br />Critical aspects of culturally relevant teaching<br />the teachers’ conception of themselves and others<br />the manner which classroom social interactions are structured<br />the teachers’ conception of knowledge<br />
    30. 30. “Book Talks” Action Plan<br />Last session will end with <br />completion of the self-assessment and comparisons between starting points and ending points<br />sharing of any newly implemented strategies related to culturally relevant teaching<br />recommendations for books to lead future “Book Talks”<br />
    31. 31. Questions for Self-Assessment<br />The questions of the self-assessment will include the following questions postulated by Ford and Moore (2004, p. 38): <br />What is “culture” and how does it affect teaching and learning, as well as relationships with diverse students?<br /> What are the cultural beliefs, values, norms, and traditions of the diverse students represented in my class and my school district?<br /> How do I feel about working with students who are different from me?<br /> What stereotypes, biases, and fears do I hold about minority students? How might these stereotypes hinder me from referring culturally diverse students for gifted education screening and placement?<br />
    32. 32. What aspects of my teaching and classroom practices (for example, my instructional style or reward system) hinder minority students’ achievement, motivation, and interests?<br /> How are the expectations I hold of diverse children different from those of White children? (For example, are minority students given challenging assignments? Do I refer them less often for gifted education screening and assessment?)<br /> How much time and effort am I willing to commit to learning about the culture of my diverse students? Similarly, how much time and effort (in my curriculum, instruction, and assessments) am I willing to devote to teaching about diverse groups and multicultural education?<br /> How can I use my students’ cultural backgrounds as scaffolding for teaching and learning, thereby avoiding the adoption and practice of a colorblind philosophy? <br /> How can I make learning culturally meaningful and relevant for all my students? What are my diverse students interested in learning? That is, what topics and issues engage them? What teaching strategies are culturally congruent and responsive? <br />
    33. 33. Conclusion<br />“He who rejects change is the architect of decay. The only human institution which rejects progress is the cemetery.” <br />~Harold Wilson<br />http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UEHNhcdyMtc<br />
    34. 34. References<br />Quick Facts. (2011). U.S. Census Records for Paulding County Georgia. <br />Retrieved July 6, 2011 from http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/13/13223.html<br />School Digger. (2011). East Paulding High School Student Demographics Retrieved July 6, 2011 from http://www.schooldigger.com/go/GA/schools/0402002188/school.aspx<br />Schunk, D. H. (2008). Learning Theories: An Educational Perspective (6th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.<br />Singham, M. (2003). The achievement gap: myths and reality. Phi Delta Kappan. Bloomington: Vol. 84, Iss. 8; 586 Retrieved July1, 2011 from <br />http://www.questia.com/googleScholar.qst?docId=5001906352<br />Singleton, G. E. and Linton, C. (2006). Courageous conversations about race. Thousand Oaks, CA: Cowin Press.<br />Taylor, S. (2003). Educating African American children: why culture matters. National Journal. 35, 3321-3334.<br />Teachers of Color Website. (2011). Classroom lessons on race, culture and language. Retrieved July 10, 2011 from http://www.teachersofcolor.com/2009/10/fall-2009-issue/<br />

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