Roman
Houses

In Latin there are two words to call houses:   
Casa-ae: “ shack”
Domus-i (or domus-us): “house”.
 
Casa

Casa-ae : this word has been used to designate the
most ancient kind of houses in Rome. They were
simple shacks. The...
Domus
Domus:

this word is used to designate the tipycal
Roman houses.
According to its characteristics they are classed i...
Virtual Roman House

DOWNLOAD THE VIDEO Roman House.avi

WATCH ON YOUTUBE Roman House.avi
Domus
( Stately Home )







It is the Roman typical house, occupied in general by an
alone family.
It is orientated...
Atrium
The atrium originally was the bedroom of the mother of the family in an old Latin
household. A further symbol conne...
Lararium
The family shrine to the household gods is
located in a small alcove just off the
atrium. The Lares are the gods ...
Peristylum
The peristylium ,the innerest room of the house, was in effect the garden of the
house, usually surrounded by c...
Vestibulum, fauces and
posticum

 

A Roman house did not open directly onto the road, but
into a small passage way, the v...
Vestibulum
Triclinium
The triclinium was the Roman dining room. With
the introduction of the Greek practice of reclining
when eating,...
Triclinium
Triclinium

A fresco painting of a triclinium, from Pompeii ( now in the Naples Archaeological Museum
Balneum
Not all Roman homes had bathrooms. Many Romans
simply went to public baths. This was a popular activity
even for R...
Balneum
Hipocaustum
A hypocaust is an ancient Roman system of central
heating. Hypocausts were used for heating public baths
and p...
Hipocaustum
Hipocaustum
Tablinum

The tablinum was the large reception room of the house. It was situated between the
atrium and the peristylium. ...
Culina
The culina or kitchen was usually small, dark,
and poorly ventilated, relegated to an obscure
corner of the house. ...
Culina
Cubiculum
The cubiculum was the bedroom of the Roman house.
Those bedrooms situated around the atrium tended to be smaller...
The fresco
Domestic interiors were claustrophobic - windowless and dark - so the Romans used painted
decoration to visuall...
Mosaics
 Mosaic is the art of creating a pattern or picture with small pieces of
colored glass, stone or other material, k...
Furnitures
Though mosaics could be spectacular, furniture, even in the homes
of the rich, tended to be basic. Stools were ...
Tabernae

The taberna could be a room in the Roman house which surrounded the atrium, but which
had its own entrance from ...
Insula
An insulae, was where the “poor people” resided. It had three or
more floors that had little rooms in them where a ...
Insulae
Villa
In their properties in the country, Romans
had usually two types of buildings that
had got different epithet accordi...
Villa rustica
The villa rustica was devoted fundamentally to the agricultural works
and therefore it had characteristics a...
Villa rustica
Villa urbana
The urban or pseudourban villa was the lodging of
the owners of the estate when they visited it.
It was built...
Villa urbana
The most important examples
of Roman houses in Aragon
Villa Fortunatus in Fraga

Peristylum

Pool in the peristylum
Villa Fortunatus in Fraga

Mosaic of the tablinum

Geometric mosaic

Agricultural calendar
Villa in Chiprana

Thermae

peristylum
Villa the Malena in Azuara

Wedding of Cadmus and
Harmonia ( mosaic)

A room of the villa
Villa The Caridad in Caminreal
Houses in Bilbilis

Lararium
Lepida Celsa

Mosaic in Dolphins’ house
Caesaraugusta

Reconstruction of the triclinium
of the Roman house
discovered in Añón street,
Zaragoza. Zaragoza Museum
Mo...
Caesaraugusta

Musas’ painting in Zaragoza Museum
Factum a
Mercedes Ortiz Ortiz
The houses in the acient Rome
The houses in the acient Rome
The houses in the acient Rome
The houses in the acient Rome
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The houses in the acient Rome

  1. 1. Roman Houses In Latin there are two words to call houses:    Casa-ae: “ shack” Domus-i (or domus-us): “house”.  
  2. 2. Casa Casa-ae : this word has been used to designate the most ancient kind of houses in Rome. They were simple shacks. They were rounds, made of logs with a thatched roof. We haven't got any example of this kind of houses, but we have got vases, funeral urns with its shape and some foundations in the Palatine Hill.
  3. 3. Domus Domus: this word is used to designate the tipycal Roman houses. According to its characteristics they are classed in three categories: • Domus: (Stately home):a single-family house. • Insula: apartment blocks . • Villa: house in the country to rest: urbana villa, or more usually a farmstead attached to an estate, complete with accommodations for the owner should he choose to visit: rustica villa.
  4. 4. Virtual Roman House DOWNLOAD THE VIDEO Roman House.avi WATCH ON YOUTUBE Roman House.avi
  5. 5. Domus ( Stately Home )      It is the Roman typical house, occupied in general by an alone family. It is orientated towards the interior. The air and the light penetrate through both central areas which other rooms are grouped around: the atrium and the peristylum. It lacks exterior sight because the exterior windows are rare and slightly spacious. It has got usually an only floor. The diverse spaces are destined for an only use.
  6. 6. Atrium The atrium originally was the bedroom of the mother of the family in an old Latin household. A further symbol connected with the atrium was the hearth, symbolism of homeliness, was situated in the atrium, the centre of the house and domestic life (the word atrium comes from the latin word “ater”: black, because of the smoke caused by the hearth there situated). The impluvium was the shallow pool sunk into floor to catch the rainwater Also it contained the little chapel to the ancestral spirits (lararium), the household safe (arca) and sometimes a bust of the master of the house.
  7. 7. Lararium The family shrine to the household gods is located in a small alcove just off the atrium. The Lares are the gods that protect the family.
  8. 8. Peristylum The peristylium ,the innerest room of the house, was in effect the garden of the house, usually surrounded by columns supporting the roof. Arund this space were opened the most important rooms of the house, the exedra, spacious room opened to the portico, the dinning room, triclinium and the others rooms, alae. Small statues and other ornamental artwork or outdoor furniture would adorn the space which, on sunny days, would be used as an outside dining area.
  9. 9. Vestibulum, fauces and posticum   A Roman house did not open directly onto the road, but into a small passage way, the vestibulum, the corridor which led from the main door onwards into the atrium was called the fauces. The Posticum: Aside from the main door, there was a servants entrance, the posticum, usually positioned at the side of the house. It was used slaves, servants, humble visitors or sometimes even by the master of the house, who sought to leave the house unnoticed by the prying eyes of onlookers in the main street.
  10. 10. Vestibulum
  11. 11. Triclinium The triclinium was the Roman dining room. With the introduction of the Greek practice of reclining when eating, the triclinium was set aside as a room especially for dining in. In fact, in many houses once would find several triclinia, rooms designated as dining areas, allowing the family a choice of which room to eat in on any particular day.
  12. 12. Triclinium
  13. 13. Triclinium A fresco painting of a triclinium, from Pompeii ( now in the Naples Archaeological Museum
  14. 14. Balneum Not all Roman homes had bathrooms. Many Romans simply went to public baths. This was a popular activity even for Romans with bathrooms, because it gave them a chance to socialize. The rich, who could afford bathrooms, could have sinks with both hot and cold running water and toilets to carry away their waste, though the toilet was usually located in the kitchen where other waste could be dumped in it. The bathroom might also have a pool or basin for bathing in.
  15. 15. Balneum
  16. 16. Hipocaustum A hypocaust is an ancient Roman system of central heating. Hypocausts were used for heating public baths and private houses. The floor was raised above the ground by pillars, and spaces were left inside the walls so that hot air and smoke from the furnace (praefurnium) would pass through these enclosed areas, thereby heating but not polluting the interior of the room. It is calculated that the temperature obtained in the housings was not more than 30 degrees. Ceramic box tiles (tubuli) were placed inside the walls to both remove the hot burned air, and also to heat the walls.
  17. 17. Hipocaustum
  18. 18. Hipocaustum
  19. 19. Tablinum The tablinum was the large reception room of the house. It was situated between the atrium and the peristylium. The tablinum generally had no wall separating it from the atrium at all and little if any walls dividing it from the peristylium. It was only separated from the atrium by a curtain which could easily be drawn back and toward the peristylium it was separated by a wooden screen or wide doors. Hence if the doors/screens and curtains of the tablinum were all opened to increase ventilation during a hot day, one could see from the atrium through the tablinum into the peristylium. In the early days, the tablinum would have acted as the study of the head of the family, the paterfamilias.
  20. 20. Culina The culina or kitchen was usually small, dark, and poorly ventilated, relegated to an obscure corner of the house. Wealthy matronae did not prepare meals; that was the job of their numerous household slaves, so it did not matter if the room was hot and smoky. Baking was done in ovens, whose tops were utilized to keep dishes warm.
  21. 21. Culina
  22. 22. Cubiculum The cubiculum was the bedroom of the Roman house. Those bedrooms situated around the atrium tended to be smaller than those round the peristylium. To the Romans these rooms were apparently of less importance than the other rooms of the house. Sometimes in front of the bedroom there was a small antechamber, the procoeton, where a personal servant would sleep.
  23. 23. The fresco Domestic interiors were claustrophobic - windowless and dark - so the Romans used painted decoration to visually open up and lighten their living spaces. The fresco is a painting realized on a surface covered with a thin and soft layer of plaster, in which lime is applied and when the last layer is still humid, one works on her, therefrom his name. Unfortunately, the Roman painting has suffered irreparable hurts in most cases and only Pompeii constitutes an exception.
  24. 24. Mosaics  Mosaic is the art of creating a pattern or picture with small pieces of colored glass, stone or other material, known as tessellae. The Romans were especially fond of using this art for flooring.
  25. 25. Furnitures Though mosaics could be spectacular, furniture, even in the homes of the rich, tended to be basic. Stools were common as opposed to chairs and reclining couches were used. Beds were simple affairs with 'springs' being provided by leather straps that criss-crossed a bed frame.  Besides the beds to sleep, other furniture existed, as tables, seats with arms and without arms, with back or without it. The furniture was completed with cupboards and safes, the lights or chandeliers that they were hanging from the walls or were put on a tripod. Also there could be stoves or braziers.
  26. 26. Tabernae The taberna could be a room in the Roman house which surrounded the atrium, but which had its own entrance from the outside and didn't lead into the interior of the house. These little rooms hence could be used as shops. Usually there was a brick counter to display goods by the entrance. Inside there usually one or more back rooms. There normally was a floor added, cutting the tall room in half to create two low floors, the upper floor being called the pergula. These cramped flats housed the very poor, perhaps a poor client family loyal to the family who inhabited the house.
  27. 27. Insula An insulae, was where the “poor people” resided. It had three or more floors that had little rooms in them where a whole family lived, a tenement block. The rooms got light only by a little window that did not contain any glass. These popular houses lacked current water. Collapses and fires occurred often in these homes.
  28. 28. Insulae
  29. 29. Villa In their properties in the country, Romans had usually two types of buildings that had got different epithet according to the principal use which they were destined for: The villa rustica, devoted fundamentally to the agricultural works The villa urbana, devoted principally to the rest of the owners of the property.
  30. 30. Villa rustica The villa rustica was devoted fundamentally to the agricultural works and therefore it had characteristics and particular buildings. Nevertheless, often it had a building reserved to the owner if he wanted to spend some time in the field. Though it wasn´t usually so luxurious as the urban villa, it had got many similarities and its more typical parts. But it had got also other typical elements like the house of the vilicus or manager of the farm, houses for the slaves (and even a prison for the rebels or ergastulum), different buildings for the cattle and the tools, barns, hay lofts, presses, watering places for farm animals...
  31. 31. Villa rustica
  32. 32. Villa urbana The urban or pseudourban villa was the lodging of the owners of the estate when they visited it. It was built in a place where the owner could enjoy himself widely the sight of the field or the sea. Normally it had got all the comforts of the city’s houses, included the heating in winter.
  33. 33. Villa urbana
  34. 34. The most important examples of Roman houses in Aragon
  35. 35. Villa Fortunatus in Fraga Peristylum Pool in the peristylum
  36. 36. Villa Fortunatus in Fraga Mosaic of the tablinum Geometric mosaic Agricultural calendar
  37. 37. Villa in Chiprana Thermae peristylum
  38. 38. Villa the Malena in Azuara Wedding of Cadmus and Harmonia ( mosaic) A room of the villa
  39. 39. Villa The Caridad in Caminreal
  40. 40. Houses in Bilbilis Lararium
  41. 41. Lepida Celsa Mosaic in Dolphins’ house
  42. 42. Caesaraugusta Reconstruction of the triclinium of the Roman house discovered in Añón street, Zaragoza. Zaragoza Museum Mosaic of Orpheus’ house
  43. 43. Caesaraugusta Musas’ painting in Zaragoza Museum
  44. 44. Factum a Mercedes Ortiz Ortiz

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