DISASTER RECOVERY PLANNING Soetam Rizky
WHY ? <ul><li>A study released by Harris Interactive, Inc. in September 2006 indicated that 39% of CIOs who participated i...
WHY ?
DISASTER RECOVERY PLANNING What is “Disaster” ? From where is disaster come ? Are we care about it ? A disaster can best b...
DISASTER RECOVERY PLANNING <ul><li>Can guarantee trustworthiness in customer relationship, whether the company doing manuf...
BUSINESS CONTINUITY PLANNING (BCP)  <ul><li>A  methodology used to create and validate a plan for maintaining continuous b...
 
 
 
 
COST OF DOWNTIME <ul><li>Step 1: Identify the Business Continuity Components That You Will Focus On </li></ul><ul><ul><li>...
GRAMM-LEACH-BLILEY ACT  (GLBA) <ul><li>Enacted in late 1999 and was intended to enhance competition in the financial servic...
GRAMM-LEACH-BLILEY ACT  (GLBA) <ul><li>At least one employee assigned to manage the safeguards </li></ul><ul><li>A thoroug...
 
CONCLUSION <ul><li>There are disasters from many sources, anytime, anywhere. </li></ul><ul><li>It’s not just about disaste...
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Disaster Recovery Planning

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Presented at "forum mahasiswa prodi manajemen" Ma Chung University

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Disaster Recovery Planning

  1. 1. DISASTER RECOVERY PLANNING Soetam Rizky
  2. 2. WHY ? <ul><li>A study released by Harris Interactive, Inc. in September 2006 indicated that 39% of CIOs who participated in the survey lacked confidence in their disaster readiness. </li></ul><ul><li>24% of CIOs in 2004 felt their disaster plans were inadequate. </li></ul><ul><li>The World Trade Center bombing in Manhattan in 1993 resulted in 150 out of the 350 businesses located in the center going out of business—that’s about a 42% failure rate. </li></ul>
  3. 3. WHY ?
  4. 4. DISASTER RECOVERY PLANNING What is “Disaster” ? From where is disaster come ? Are we care about it ? A disaster can best be defined as the occurrence of any event that causes a significant disruption in IT capabilities. It is typically an event that disrupts the normal course of business to the extent that monetary losses can be quantified (Maiwald,2002). <ul><li>Disaster not only be happen from nature anger, for example : earthquake, tsunami and flood. </li></ul><ul><li>However, the disaster can also happen from non-technical factors, for instance : electricity failure, hardware failure, virus or even human errors </li></ul><ul><li>Information system implementation rarely care about disaster recovery planning. </li></ul><ul><li>Eventhough datas from the application is very important for company, high level management seems ignoring all of the risk that can be happened in their company when the disaster come. </li></ul>
  5. 5. DISASTER RECOVERY PLANNING <ul><li>Can guarantee trustworthiness in customer relationship, whether the company doing manufacturing business or services business. </li></ul><ul><li>Also undertaking business continuity planning that should come afterward disaster recovery planning </li></ul><ul><li>A business continuity plan can be considered the all-encompassing corporate plan that describes the processes and procedures an organization puts in place to ensure all aspects of business can resume and be recovered should a disruption occur </li></ul>
  6. 6. BUSINESS CONTINUITY PLANNING (BCP) <ul><li>A methodology used to create and validate a plan for maintaining continuous business operations before, during, and after disasters and disruptive events. </li></ul><ul><li>Companies require their businesses run continuously, and their overall operational plans reflect this priority regardless of the potential risk, threat, or cause of an outage. </li></ul><ul><li>Ex : server downtime strategy, old Y2k issue </li></ul>
  7. 11. COST OF DOWNTIME <ul><li>Step 1: Identify the Business Continuity Components That You Will Focus On </li></ul><ul><ul><li>People — How will you notify, evacuate, transport, and care for employees (including, for example, paying them)? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Property — What equipment will you need and how will you source it? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Systems — What portions of your computing and telecommunications infrastructure must be duplicated immediately? Is that in a minute, an hour, or a day? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Data — What data is critical to run your business, and how will you recover critical data that's lost? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Step 2: Define What You're Protecting </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Define what IT elements associated with those competencies must be protected. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>These competencies are the heart of what your business does and your unique proposition in the market - your competitive advan- tage. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A core competency could be a product, service, process, or methodology </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Step 3: Prioritize Business Functions </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Vault Management— The company's primary operational system that manages off-site tape inventories and movement. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Customer Facing Applications— All hardware and software used by customers to retrieve information on their off-site data or to communicate with Iron Mountain about their account(s). </li></ul></ul>
  8. 12. GRAMM-LEACH-BLILEY ACT (GLBA) <ul><li>Enacted in late 1999 and was intended to enhance competition in the financial services industry. </li></ul><ul><li>Requires financial institutions (and others that operate in the financial services industry) to create and implement policies to protect private information from foreseeable threats in both security and data integrity. </li></ul>
  9. 13. GRAMM-LEACH-BLILEY ACT (GLBA) <ul><li>At least one employee assigned to manage the safeguards </li></ul><ul><li>A thorough risk management plan for each department that handles nonpublic information </li></ul><ul><li>A plan to develop, implement, test, manage, and monitor data security </li></ul><ul><li>A process for updating and changing the plan as methods of collecting, storing, transmitting, and managing data change </li></ul>
  10. 15. CONCLUSION <ul><li>There are disasters from many sources, anytime, anywhere. </li></ul><ul><li>It’s not just about disaster recovery planning, it also about business continuity planning </li></ul><ul><li>Auditors must recommend and checked client’s DRP and BCP </li></ul><ul><li>And, last but not least, the institution must aware about disaster. </li></ul>

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