Energy and Legislative issues pertaining to Solid State Lighting Sameer Sodhi General Manager, LED Systems
Presentation Overview <ul><ul><li>OSRAM SYLVANIA Introduction </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>LED’s versus incumbent technologi...
OSRAM SYLVANIA’s vision for LED lighting <ul><li>OSRAM SYLVANIA is committed to develop and promote environmentally friend...
LED value chain: Bridging the gap between discrete devices and system solutions Power + Control Fixture OEM’s OSRAM  SYLVA...
Key advantages of LED’s for general illumination <ul><li>Long life (50K hrs) </li></ul><ul><li>Directional light source </...
Lighting Technology Comparison: Lamp LPW vs. technology The above graph represents lamp level efficacies. Looking at thing...
1950 // 100 50 Light source efficacy  (  Lumen/Watt) Light Source Efficacy over Time Comparison Year of invention Mercury ...
LED Device Efficacy Roadmap  Instant-on, 350mA Max. Device Efficacy 228lm/W, 6500K, 75CRI Max. Device Efficacy 162lm/W, 30...
LED Device Cost Roadmap Source:  Multi-Year program plan, SSL R&D, US D.O.E, prepared by Navigant consulting, March 2008
Breakdown of lighting energy consumption 2001 (US) Quad = quadrillion British thermal units. 10,768 BTU = 1kWh Approximate...
Lighting Energy Consumption by Sector, 2001 58 TWh/yr 108 TWh/yr 208 TWh/yr 391 TWh/yr
Energy consumption by lighting technologies, 2001 321 TWh/yr 313 TWh/yr 130 TWh/yr Total consumption  765 TWh/yr
Annual electricity consumption estimates by niche sectors Source:  Energy savings estimates of light emitting diodes in ni...
Energy savings potential of SSL <ul><ul><li>The 12 niche segments represent approximately 67% of all lighting electrical e...
Vertical door freezer case application example LED luminaires can deliver significant energy savings while maintaining acc...
Vertical door freezer case application examples
Recessed downlight application example LED luminaires can meet and exceed CFL luminaire efficacy! 34.5% improvement in eff...
Image placeholder DLM700 <ul><ul><li>700 lumens </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>CRI: 80 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>65° beam ang...
Recessed downlight application examples
Legislative updates EISA – Energy Independence and Security Act (2007) <ul><li>Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA)...
EPACT 2005 Energy Policy Act of 2005, Public Law 109-58 <ul><li>EPACT 2005 directs the Secretary of Energy to; </li></ul><...
Bright Tomorrow Lighting Prizes <ul><li>Government sponsored competition to spur the development of highly efficient solid...
EISA – Energy Independence and Security Act (2007)  General Service Incandescent Lamps  Coverage and General Requirements ...
EISA – Energy Independence and Security Act (2007)  General Service Incandescent Lamp New Federal   Standards <ul><li>Modi...
General Service Incandescent Lamps  EISA Effect on States <ul><li>California and Nevada are not pre-empted on timing </li>...
EISA – Energy Independence and Security Act (2007)  General Service Lamps Next DOE Rulemaking <ul><li>Per EISA, to begin n...
EISA – Energy Independence and Security Act (2007) What is a general service lamp? <ul><li>The term “general service lamp”...
Barriers to adoption of LED technology in General Lighting <ul><ul><li>Consistent quality of light </li></ul></ul><ul><ul>...
Interior Lighting LED Lighting Examples: Decorative uplighting Lotte Adventure World, Seoul, Korea HF 2 chain
Acanto,  Milan , Italy LINEARlight Colormix Flex LED Lighting Examples: Decorative coves
General Illumination LED Examples: Cove Lighting Jefferson Memorial, Washington DC LINEARlight Flex
LED Lighting Examples: Display cases
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Arch Led2008 Ssl Energy Legislative2

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SSL in General Lighting - Energy and Legislative Updates

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  • Arch Led2008 Ssl Energy Legislative2

    1. 1. Energy and Legislative issues pertaining to Solid State Lighting Sameer Sodhi General Manager, LED Systems
    2. 2. Presentation Overview <ul><ul><li>OSRAM SYLVANIA Introduction </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>LED’s versus incumbent technologies </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Energy savings potential of SSL </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Legislative updates relevant to SSL </li></ul></ul>
    3. 3. OSRAM SYLVANIA’s vision for LED lighting <ul><li>OSRAM SYLVANIA is committed to develop and promote environmentally friendly and energy efficient lighting systems. </li></ul><ul><li>LED systems for general and specialty lighting and automotive headlamps reflect our current focus on commercializing this technology. </li></ul><ul><li>We believe in using lighting technology to offer products that are useful, create new applications and are fun to use </li></ul><ul><li>“ We make better light for better living” </li></ul>
    4. 4. LED value chain: Bridging the gap between discrete devices and system solutions Power + Control Fixture OEM’s OSRAM SYLVANIA Board Heat sink Optics Driver Light Source Chip Package
    5. 5. Key advantages of LED’s for general illumination <ul><li>Long life (50K hrs) </li></ul><ul><li>Directional light source </li></ul><ul><li>Small size </li></ul><ul><li>Flexible light source/unique looks/trendy </li></ul><ul><li>Color tunability of white light </li></ul><ul><li>Colored lighting </li></ul><ul><li>Energy efficiency/savings </li></ul><ul><li>Maintenance cost savings </li></ul><ul><li>Low voltage/safety </li></ul><ul><li>Rugged </li></ul>
    6. 6. Lighting Technology Comparison: Lamp LPW vs. technology The above graph represents lamp level efficacies. Looking at things from a luminaire efficacy perspective or an application efficacy perspective yields different results
    7. 7. 1950 // 100 50 Light source efficacy ( Lumen/Watt) Light Source Efficacy over Time Comparison Year of invention Mercury vapor lamps 1904 CFL 1981 Incandescent 1879 Halogen 1959 Fluorescent 1938 Metal halide lamps 1961 White Power LED 2000 1996 2002 2006 2008 2012
    8. 8. LED Device Efficacy Roadmap Instant-on, 350mA Max. Device Efficacy 228lm/W, 6500K, 75CRI Max. Device Efficacy 162lm/W, 3000K, 90CRI Source: Multi-Year program plan, SSL R&D, US D.O.E, prepared by Navigant consulting, March 2008
    9. 9. LED Device Cost Roadmap Source: Multi-Year program plan, SSL R&D, US D.O.E, prepared by Navigant consulting, March 2008
    10. 10. Breakdown of lighting energy consumption 2001 (US) Quad = quadrillion British thermal units. 10,768 BTU = 1kWh Approximate energy consumption for lighting in 2007 could be as high as 8.8 Quads or 821 TWhr/yr 22 % of all electrical energy consumption in the US is for lighting (Approx. 765 Twh or 8.2 Quads used for lighting in 2001)
    11. 11. Lighting Energy Consumption by Sector, 2001 58 TWh/yr 108 TWh/yr 208 TWh/yr 391 TWh/yr
    12. 12. Energy consumption by lighting technologies, 2001 321 TWh/yr 313 TWh/yr 130 TWh/yr Total consumption 765 TWh/yr
    13. 13. Annual electricity consumption estimates by niche sectors Source: Energy savings estimates of light emitting diodes in niche lighting applications, US D.O.E, prepared by Navigant Consulting, Sep 2008 189 TWh 8.7 TWh 397 TWh Total 12.6 22 Step, Path, and Porch lights 44.7 178.3 Street and area lights Outdoor White-Light Applications 1.4 3.43 Office undershelf lighting 2.2 2.84 Kitchen under-cabinet lighting 13 18.8 Task lighting 7.9 32 Retail display 2.1 0.08 3.6% 13.4 Refrigerated display cases 81.2 103.1 Recessed downlights Indoor White-Light Applications 7.53 0.95 6.1% 11.6 Electric signage 5.18 4.56 88% 2.5 Exit signs 6.3 0.33 5.2% 6.63 Decorative holiday lights 4.85 2.82 52% 2.38 Traffic Signals Colored Lighting Potential Maximum Electricity Savings (TWh) 2007 Electricity Savings realized (TWh) 2007 LED Market Penetration Annual Electricity Consumption (TWh) Application
    14. 14. Energy savings potential of SSL <ul><ul><li>The 12 niche segments represent approximately 67% of all lighting electrical energy consumption annually </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Current total electrical energy savings from LED penetration is approximately 1%, primarily from Exit signs and Traffic signals </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The maximum potential lighting electrical energy savings from fully converting to LEDs in these niche segments would be approximately 23% (189 TWh out of 821 TWh) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>This would be equivalent to avoiding approximately 23 coal power plants (1000 MW stations) </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Alternatively, enough electricity would be saved to power approximately 15 million homes </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Current energy savings estimates from LEDs is based on luminaire efficacies of 22.5 lm/W to 60.9 lm/W – as efficacies improve the savings could be even higher </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>As other segments adopt LEDs the total potential for energy savings would increase further </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The above analysis was only for the US market – global impact would be significantly higher </li></ul></ul>
    15. 15. Vertical door freezer case application example LED luminaires can deliver significant energy savings while maintaining acceptable light levels! 100% improvement in efficacy. Significant savings in energy 22W 55W Typical input power (with ballast/power supply) 50 LPW 25 LPW Typ efficacy (LED PS 85%) 4100K 4100K CCT 1100 lm 1400 lm Light exiting fixture (after losses at 20 º F) LED Linear Fluorescent (58W lamp)
    16. 16. Vertical door freezer case application examples
    17. 17. Recessed downlight application example LED luminaires can meet and exceed CFL luminaire efficacy! 34.5% improvement in efficacy 26W 35W Typical input power (with ballast/power supply) 43.6 LPW 32.4 LPW Typ efficacy (LED PS 85%) 3500K 3500K CCT 1134 lm 1134 lm Light exiting fixture (after losses) 1470 lm 2400 lm Lightsource Lumens LED CFL (32W lamp)
    18. 18. Image placeholder DLM700 <ul><ul><li>700 lumens </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>CRI: 80 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>65° beam angle </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>CCT: 3500K and 2700K </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Integrated and fully optimized system </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Smooth distribution, low aperture brightness </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>No pixilation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>46 LPW (thermally stabilized w. power supply) </li></ul></ul>A directional LED lightsource example
    19. 19. Recessed downlight application examples
    20. 20. Legislative updates EISA – Energy Independence and Security Act (2007) <ul><li>Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA), effective December 19 th , 2007. Public Law 110-140 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Builds on directives issued in the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT 2005) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Instituted “Bright Tomorrow Lighting Prizes” for solid state lighting </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mandates increase in energy efficacy of general service incandescent lamps starting 2012 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Directs Secretary of Energy to initiate rulemaking to establish standards for general service lamps (LEDs, OLEDs, general service incandescent lamps, CFLs) greater or equal to 45 lm/W by January 1, 2020 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Authorizes a lighting research and development program of $10 Million/yr for fiscal years 2008 - 2013 </li></ul></ul>
    21. 21. EPACT 2005 Energy Policy Act of 2005, Public Law 109-58 <ul><li>EPACT 2005 directs the Secretary of Energy to; </li></ul><ul><li>Carry out a “Next Generation Lighting Initiative” to support the research and development of solid-state lighting </li></ul><ul><li>Develop SSL technologies based on white LEDs that are longer lasting, more energy efficient, and cost competitive to incumbent technologies </li></ul><ul><li>Competitively select an Industry Alliance to represent private, for-profit firms that are representative of the US SSL research, development, infrastructure and manufacturing expertise </li></ul><ul><li>Develop roadmaps in consultation with the industry alliance </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>The Next Generation Lighting Industry Alliance (NGLIA), administered by NEMA signed a Memorandum of Agreement with the DOE in February 2005 to enhance the manufacturing and commercialization of SSL technologies </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul>
    22. 22. Bright Tomorrow Lighting Prizes <ul><li>Government sponsored competition to spur the development of highly efficient solid state lighting products to replace the common light bulb. </li></ul><ul><li>Establishes 3 categories of prizes for solid state lighting products </li></ul><ul><li>Competition would include a rigorous evaluation process including performance and lifetime testing, field installations, and stress tests </li></ul><ul><li>More than 150 lm/W </li></ul><ul><li>More than 1200 lumens </li></ul><ul><li>More than 25,000 hours </li></ul><ul><li>More than 90 CRI </li></ul><ul><li>CCT between 2750 K to 3000 K </li></ul><ul><li>Award amount $5 M </li></ul><ul><li>More than 123 lm/W </li></ul><ul><li>Less than 11 W </li></ul><ul><li>More than 1350 lumens </li></ul><ul><li>More than 25,000 hours </li></ul><ul><li>More than 90 CRI </li></ul><ul><li>CCT between 2750 K to 3000 K </li></ul><ul><li>Award amount $5 M </li></ul><ul><li>More than 90 lm/W </li></ul><ul><li>Less than 10 W </li></ul><ul><li>More than 900 lumens </li></ul><ul><li>More than 25,000 hours </li></ul><ul><li>More than 90 CRI </li></ul><ul><li>CCT between 2750 K to 3000K </li></ul><ul><li>Award amount $10 M </li></ul>21 st Century Lamp PAR38 Halogen Replacement Lamp 60W Incandescent Replacement Lamp
    23. 23. EISA – Energy Independence and Security Act (2007) General Service Incandescent Lamps Coverage and General Requirements <ul><li>Covers incandescent or halogen lamps Intended for general service applications </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Medium screw base lamps </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Lumen range of 310-2600 (40-100W in today’s wattages) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Capable of operating in range of 110-130V </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Establishes maximum wattages for 4 specific lumen ranges, minimum rated life and CRI </li></ul><ul><li>Caps wattage on two other types </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Candelabra-base lamps at 60W </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Intermediate-base lamps at 40W </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Outlaws all adapters to medium screw base sockets </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Identifies types not covered </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Appliance, bug, colored, infrared, marine, mine, reflector, rough service, shatter-resistant, sign, 3-way, traffic, vibration service, etc. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Establishes a watch list of 5 lamp types that may be regulated in the future </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Rough service, vibration service, 3-way, shatter-resistant and 2601-3300 lumen lamps (150W) </li></ul></ul></ul>
    24. 24. EISA – Energy Independence and Security Act (2007) General Service Incandescent Lamp New Federal Standards <ul><li>Modified spectrum ( Daylight ™ ) lumen ranges are 25% lower, same max watts </li></ul><ul><li>Minimum 80 CRI except for modified spectrum, which is a minimum of 75 CRI </li></ul>1/1/2014 1,000 hours 29 310-749 40 1/1/2014 1,000 hours 43 750-1049 60 1/1/2013 1,000 hours 53 1050-1489 75 1/1/2012 1,000 hours 72 1490-2600 100 Effective Date (Manufactured on or after) Minimum Rated Lifetime New Maximum Rated Wattage Rated Lumen Ranges Current Wattage
    25. 25. General Service Incandescent Lamps EISA Effect on States <ul><li>California and Nevada are not pre-empted on timing </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>California’s Title 20 standards effective 1/1/2008 remain in effect until the Federal standards become effective </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>40W became 38W; 60W -> 57W; 75W->71W; 100W->95W (5% energy savings) </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Nevada adopted legislation that called for all “general purpose lights” sold in the state to be 25 LPW by 1/1/2012 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>California and Nevada may (and will) adopt the Federal standards no more than one year earlier than the Federal effective dates </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Phase-in schedule must be maintained – starts in 2011 and ends in 2013 instead of starting in 2012 and ending in 2014 </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>All other states are preempted from enacting anything different from federal standards & federal timing </li></ul></ul>
    26. 26. EISA – Energy Independence and Security Act (2007) General Service Lamps Next DOE Rulemaking <ul><li>Per EISA, to begin no later than 1/1/2014 </li></ul><ul><li>If standards are amended, then… </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Final rule to be published not later than 1/1/2017 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Effective date not earlier than 3 years after final rule is published </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>“ If the DOE fails to complete a rulemaking or if the final rule does not produce savings that are ≥ the savings from a minimum efficacy standard of 45 LPW , effective 1/1/2020, the Secretary shall prohibit the sale of any general service lamp that does not meet a minimum efficacy of 45 LPW.” </li></ul><ul><li>California may also adopt in 2018 whatever the feds set for 2020 </li></ul>NOTE: In 2020 any new minimum LPW standard applies to all general service lamps , not just to general service incandescent lamps.
    27. 27. EISA – Energy Independence and Security Act (2007) What is a general service lamp? <ul><li>The term “general service lamp” includes </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>general service incandescent lamps (medium screw base) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>compact fluorescent lamps (no base mentioned) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>general service LED or OLED lamps (no base mentioned) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>any other lamps DOE determines are used to satisfy lighting applications traditionally served by general service incandescent lamps </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>This EISA provision could mean </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>General service incandescent and halogen as we know them are gone – to be replaced by CFL and LED, or…. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>CFLs & LEDs will be subject to separate, higher LPW standards, or… </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Both </li></ul></ul></ul>
    28. 28. Barriers to adoption of LED technology in General Lighting <ul><ul><li>Consistent quality of light </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Binning challenges and limitations </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>CRI of some of the white light generation techniques (RGB, RGBW, RW…) </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Standardization is evolving </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Of terminologies </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Of performance metrics </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>And eventually of light sources/systems </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Initial system costs are still quite high </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Continued rapid pace of change in technology </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Emergence of OLEDs, other inorganic LED technologies, improvements in existing lighting technologies </li></ul></ul>
    29. 29. Interior Lighting LED Lighting Examples: Decorative uplighting Lotte Adventure World, Seoul, Korea HF 2 chain
    30. 30. Acanto, Milan , Italy LINEARlight Colormix Flex LED Lighting Examples: Decorative coves
    31. 31. General Illumination LED Examples: Cove Lighting Jefferson Memorial, Washington DC LINEARlight Flex
    32. 32. LED Lighting Examples: Display cases

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