Mcc Generations Asce

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  • Thank you. Thank you to Executive Director Mellissa Mace and the Missouri Campus Compact Staff for organizing a wonderful conference. I have learned much from all of you in my brief time here in Missouri. I hope something of what I offer tonight will be equally as useful to you.

    A friend, on hearing that I was speaking in Missouri advised that I needed to acknowledge the “Show Me” state in some way in my talk. Well you all have certainly shown me the innovative, robust, and cutting edge service-learning that is happening across the colleges and universities of this state. I congratulate you for that. Bravo.

    I also wanted to thank Missouri State University for hosting this conference and for making the institutional commitment to support not only local service-learning initiatives, but also the state-wide work of the Compact. It is the leadership of institutions like MSU that sustain the work of the Compact and of the movement to which we all belong.

    It’s that Movement that I will return to later in my talk as I believe we are at a pivotal moment in the history of our movement. For now though, I will remain true to my assignment. This evening I intend to say a few words about:
    --This Generation of Students – characteristics and opportunities
    --This Generation of Faculty – Introducing Faculty to the “Field”
    --The Next Phase of Community Partnerships – What CBOs Tell Us
    --The Next Generation of Assessment and Strategic Infrastructure – What Students Say We Need to do
    --The New Movement Opportunities - Convergence of CNCS/CC/Bonner/etc.

    Along the way I will offer you some of the practices we have found effective in our program.
  • When Melissa contacted me she told me that you were looking for a speaker who could speak to the unique challenges and opportunities presented to the service-learning community by this generation of students. So I will begin there and I intend to end there, though I will ask your indulgence along the way. The sociologist in me cannot but move from the characteristics of individuals out to the structures they inhabit and the larger society.

    Echo Boomers, Gen Y, Millennial

    Demographics:

    70 + million in US….~25% of us population….Born 77-94….Radically more ethnically diverse

    Most independent generation ever (divorce, latch-key, single parents, technology, etc.)

    Most empowered generation because of “Concerted Cultivation” or heli-parenting

    Tuned out to “news”…..Tuned in to “pop-culture”….Information is to be used!
  • Gen Y Parenting:
    Child Centered Families….Involved Fathers….Parent education ….Do good = rewards

    Parents guided achievements, took part in activities, structured the child’s life-world, and reinforced the child’s self worth by valuing the child highly.

    Thus, Gen Y feel they can do anything because they have been told they can by parents who have always been there to help and media who relish the exceptional achievement.

    Paradoxically, the care about community connections—“I am the center so must care about the whole.”

    Strong sense of Values

    Next Slide-----Marketing Community
  • Technology: (slide 6)
    3 out of 4 online,
    93% advanced computer literacy,
    most internet use for entertainment,
    email-text-twitter-etc. more common communication than phone or face-to-face.

    Multitude of sources of info from early age =
    questioning of virtually all information + looking for voices that support their position

    More Plastic/ adaptable than any previous generation…..Efficient Multi-taskers…..Higher input and output

    Impatient… need to be challenged

    Skeptical… need to understand rationale and have instant access to information to test ideas

    Blunt and Expressive ..its about achieving the goal

    Image Driven ..constant observation

    Technology = convenience, utility, not end in itself.
  • Work:
    “Have you see “The Office”?”…..18 months to leadership position

    Mobile—Leadership—Better, Faster, Smarter—Efficiency

    Not as much work experience before 25 as previous generations

    Remained within their generational cohort longer than previous generations

    “Interesting work” is top priority for – 62.5% under 30

    65% of teenagers said they’d rather have a career that gives them time for family and fun than a career with more money.
  • Hold this picture in your minds eye because we will return to it in the end. Ambitious, empowered, idealistic, tech-savvy, upstarts, with little reverence for the “old” ways.
  • Opportunities:
    1.Encourage their values—community, transparency, efficiency, work-ethic, idealism, optimism

    2.Train them—capitalize on their ability to learn rapidly (difference between book-knowledge and job-knowledge)

    3.Mentor them—show them how to be the leaders they desire to be and how to work cross-generationally

    4.Show them their impact—build feed-back mechanisms that indicate the impact

    5.Be transparent—explain policy and expect questions

    6.Create paths—structured yet open to individualization

    7.Provide Access to Technology—Be open to new efficiencies
  • Why we do service learning?


    Along the way we found that, done well, it has positive effects on learning outcomes, student retention, and a host of other instructional and institutional goals.
  • How we do service learning? (Tom Ehrlich)
    Mostly co-curricular through deeply curricular

    On to Community Impact....central to the public mission of all American Higher Ed

    We are now a “Field” or what sociologist would call a “Movement”
    Best Practices, Professionals, Modalities, Funding Streams, Career Pathways, Research, etc.

    As a Movement/Field we need to constantly be replenishing the our ranks with new students, faculty, and community partners on a regular basis.
  • Challenge 1: Little understanding of the “field” among many faculty.
    * The range of practice from co-curricular to curricular, from community service to community-based research, etc.

    *The literature and developed best practices.

    *The proven pedagogical effectiveness.

    *The training and professional development available.

    *etc.

    Faculty interview study results:
    Challenge 2: bias against “feel-good,” “add-on” of little educational benefit

    Challenge 3: most would consider if: trained, integrated/rigorous, valued, supported
  • Solution 1: Retreats……..Generations of Service-Learning:

    Solution 2: Our training outline: (PBSL)
    Part one: learning objectives, building classroom capacity and community

    Part two: choosing, building, and managing effective partnerships

    Part three: matching partner needs and course learning objectives

    Part four: think developmentally

    Solution 3: Infrastructure.....in a minute.

    but let me walk you through the “Generations” slides.
  • Meeting Course Learning Objectives through Service Pedagogy
  • CBO Feedback to HE
    The War on Poverty is an utter failure!!
    We have all we can do to meet the immediate needs of our clients.
    We are frustrated by episodic volunteering.
    We will not be used as a petri dish for HE. (Harlem Childrens Zone and Columbia University)
    We have a GAP! In our partnerships with HE.
    That gap is about moving toward Civic Innovation!

    Bonner GAP
  • Bonner Data is reflective of Sirianni’s analysis:

    Many CBOs meet urgent needs.

    Some CBOs also do Civic Innovation.

    Civic Innovation is mobilizing resources, programs, and strategies that engage community members in addressing underlying causes of unmet human needs through participation in democratic problem solving activities.

    Those CBOs who are doing CI are part of a CI movement. We, at our best, are also part of that movement.
  • Infrastructure: 
    We provide an infrastructure of academic support services for faculty, students, and community partners.
    VISTA
    Bonner
    Policy Options Team
    Faculty Fellows

     Capacity Building: 
    In each Partnership we make, our goal is to build the capacity of:
           a. the organization to meet the needs of its clients
           b. the student to successfully take leadership roles that emphasize justice and service
           c. the faculty to better integrate place-based and problem-based learning into their classes by aligning the needs of community partners with course learning objectives to produce rigorous learning experiences that are also of service to others.

    Multi-faceted: 
    Our approach to Community Partnerships includes collaboration on:
          a. Siena VISTA Fellows Site Placements
          b. Siena Bonner Service Leader Site Placements
          c. Academic Service Learning Partnerships
          d. Academic Internship Site Placements
          e. Occasional Volunteer Site Placements
          f. Site-Based Team Management of Volunteers 
          g. Community-Based Research Partnerships
          h. Collaborative Resource Development
          i. Collaborative Strategic Planning
          j. Non-Profit Community Networking and Collaboration
          k. Technical Assistance (Web 2.0, Board Training, etc.)
          I. an ongoing, three-year plan of collaboration with each partner. 

    Developmental Commitment: 
    We are developmentally oriented and committed to sustainable Community Partnerships.

    Integrated: 
    We seek to more fully integrate the academic pathways and experiences of students with the service experiences in which they participate.  This may take the form of Academic Service Learning, but may also take the form of assisting students with connecting cognate course work with an issue of particular importance to the Community Partner with which they are serving or the form of Community-Based Research projects .  For examples a student working on refugee resettlement with a Community Partner may be advised to take a political science course on Refugees and Child Soldiers. 

    Contextualized:  
    We encourage and facilitate students and others to reflect on their participation in Community Partnerships through the lenses of social, philosophical, and theological analysis. 
  • This generation of students is uniquely suited to meet the challenges of our field to move to the next level of campus engagement!

    Invite them to Co-Produce

    They are Assets we need to build the infrastructure, organize the academic community, and further our “field”

    We can share our professional expertise by mentoring a cadre of student leaders.

    As we do, we will move students from concern about their post-college job to a public service career

    We need to rededicate ourselves to knitting together our “Field” (stanton, giles, and cruz) by incentivizing partnerships

    We need to develop systems of faculty, student and partner acknowledgment of membership in the “Field” and of their good work.

    Student leadership at all levels.
  • Mcc Generations Asce

    1. 1. Generations of Service: Students, Faculty, & Institutional Practices Dr. Mathew Johnson Director of Academic Community Engagement Associate Professor of Sociology and Environmental Studies Siena College
    2. 2. Outline for this Evening This Generation of Students – Characteristics and opportunities This Generation of Faculty – Introducing Faculty to the “Field” The Next Phase of Community Partnerships – What CBOs Tell Us The Next Generation of Assessment and Strategic Infrastructure – What Students Say We Need to do The New Movement Opportunities - Convergence of CNCS/CC/Bonner/etc. Along the way I will offer you some of the practices we have found
    3. 3. The Next Generation of Students – Characteristics and Opportunities 70 + million in US….~25% of us population….Born 77-94….Most diverse Independent... Empowered “Concerted Cultivation” Tuned out to “news”…..Tuned in to “pop-culture”….Information is to be used!
    4. 4. Gen Y Parenting Practices Child Centered Families….Involved Fathers….Parent education …. Do good = rewards Parents guided achievements, took part in activities, structured the child’s life- world, and reinforced the child’s self worth by valuing the child highly. Thus, Gen Y feel they can do anything because they have been told they can by parents who have always been there to help and media who relish the exceptional achievement. Paradoxically, they care about community connections—“I am the center so must care about the whole.”
    5. 5. Brand Communities
    6. 6. Technology 3 out of 4 online 93% advanced computer literacy most internet use for entertainment, email-text-twitter-etc. more common communication than phone or face-to-face. Multitude of sources of info from early age = questioning of virtually all information + looking for voices that support their perspectives or speak to their problems/challenges
    7. 7. Work “Have you see “The Office”?”…..18 months to leadership position Mobile Leadership Better, Faster, Smarter Efficiency Ambitious, achievement oriented
    8. 8. STUDENTS Multi-Taskers Tech Savvy Idealistic Valuing Community Ambitious Empowered Eager for Leadership Responsibility Critical of the Status-quo Focused on Efficiency and Impact EXPERIENCED IN SERVICE
    9. 9. Reflect for a moment... • What opportunities might you see in the unique characteristics of Gen Y students? • Share with your neighbor.
    10. 10. Opportunities Encourage their values Train them Mentor them Show them their impact Be transparent Create paths Provide Access to Technology Provide Developmental Leadership Opportunities Partners in the Firm or Apprentices in the “Field”
    11. 11. The Next Generation of Faculty – Introducing Faculty to the “Field” Why do we do service? (Carnegie) Moral Virtue Better Workers Better Citizens Social Justice
    12. 12. The Next Generation of Faculty – Introducing Faculty to the “Field” How we do service-learning (Ehrlich) connect thought and feeling developing skills and knowledge for leadership developing skills/ commitment to civic engagement developing skills and commitment to political engagement promote community problem solving community impact
    13. 13. Faculty Challenges Challenge 1: Little understanding of the “field” among many faculty Challenge 2: Bias Challenge 3: Training, Support, Value
    14. 14. I appreciate all the social work faculty being included in this conversation, and I'd like to share a couple thoughts: As the College moves toward greater quantity and complexity of varied "service learning" opportunities, I think it is critical for us all to clarify the meanings and different requirements and expectations of: volunteering, service- based academic learning, internships, and specialized internships (e.g. "field education" as exists in our nationally accredited social work program). I'm sensing a "semantic slippery slope"; i.e. a casual way of using them interchangeably. That will create problems in planning, advisement, and ultimately in students receiving proper credit.
    15. 15. Our Faculty Solutions Solution 1: Retreats ... Generations of SL Solution 2: Training ... 2 Day Intensive Solution 3: Infrastructure
    16. 16. GENERATIONS OF ASL FIRST WAVE: COURSE CONTENT + PARALLEL INDIVIDUAL SERVICE EXPERIENCE WITH LITTLE IF ANY REFLECTION.
    17. 17. GENERATIONS OF ASL FIRST WAVE: COURSE CONTENT + PARALLEL INDIVIDUAL SERVICE EXPERIENCE WITH LITTLE IF ANY REFLECTION. SECOND WAVE: COURSE CONTENT + PARALLEL INDIVIDUAL SERVICE EXPERIENCE + SOME STRUCTURED REFLECTION ABOUT SERVICE.
    18. 18. GENERATIONS OF ASL FIRST WAVE: COURSE CONTENT + PARALLEL INDIVIDUAL SERVICE EXPERIENCE WITH LITTLE IF ANY REFLECTION. SECOND WAVE: COURSE CONTENT + PARALLEL INDIVIDUAL SERVICE EXPERIENCE + SOME STRUCTURED REFLECTION ABOUT SERVICE. THIRD WAVE: COURSE CONTENT + APPLICATION OF CONTENT IN PARALLEL INDIVIDUAL SERVICE EXPERIENCE + STRUCTURED REFLECTION ABOUT SERVICE AND ASSESSMENT OF APPLICATION.
    19. 19. GENERATIONS OF ASL THIRD WAVE: COURSE CONTENT + APPLICATION OF CONTENT IN PARALLEL INDIVIDUAL SERVICE EXPERIENCE + STRUCTURED REFLECTION ABOUT SERVICE AND ASSESSMENT OF APPLICATION FOURTH WAVE: COURSE CONTENT TAUGHT THROUGH AN EXPERIENTIALLY BASED APPLICATION OF CONTENT TO A SOCIAL NEED.
    20. 20. GENERATIONS OF ASL THIRD WAVE: COURSE CONTENT + APPLICATION OF CONTENT IN PARALLEL INDIVIDUAL SERVICE EXPERIENCE + STRUCTURED REFLECTION ABOUT SERVICE AND ASSESSMENT OF APPLICATION FOURTH WAVE: COURSE CONTENT TAUGHT THROUGH AN EXPERIENTIALLY BASED APPLICATION OF CONTENT TO A SOCIAL NEED. BEST PRACTICE: THIRD WAVE + FOURTH WAVE + PREPARED STUDENT BODY + PREPARED COMMUNITY PARTNERS
    21. 21. GENERATIONS OF ASL TODAY'S DEFINITION OF ASL: ACQUISITION, AND CONCRETE APPLICATION OF (DISCIPLINARY) KNOWLEDGE, IN AND THROUGH USEFUL SERVICE FOR A COMMUNITY PARTNER ADDRESSING HUMAN NEEDS.
    22. 22. Reflect for a moment... • Does your campus conceive of S-L as a Field? • Research, Expertise, Professional • How might your begin knitting this together? • How might you communicate to Faculty? • How can you imagine providing support services for faculty?
    23. 23. Discussed Students & Faculty Now....CBOs and Assessment
    24. 24. The Next Generation of CBOs – The Civic Innovation Movement CBO Feedback to HE (Stoeker) Minding the GAP (Johnson) Moving toward Civic Innovation (Sirianni)
    25. 25. Sirianni: The Civic Renewal Movement: Community Building and Democracy in the United States
    26. 26. The Next Generation of Assessment & Strategic Infrastructure – What Students Say We Need to Do Previous Generations of Assessment Furco Rubric etc etc etc Limitations Self assessment
    27. 27. Assessing Service in H.e. Course Level Assessment.....Pre-Post Self-Assessment Rubrics Student Quiz
    28. 28. FURCO
    29. 29. FURCO
    30. 30. Holland
    31. 31. BONNER Levels1-5
    32. 32. RUBRICS AND STRATEGIC PLANNING Each of these tools have been useful in suggesting specific areas of focus for strategic planning of institutional programs, structures, and practices that are designed to support service and civic engagement. A fully engaged campus requires institutionalization across several axis of institutional life. Build the pieces/foundations and the rest will take care of itself.
    33. 33. PROBLEM: No tool to assess the effects of institutional attempts to shape student experiences. So, you have built it (or are on your way to building it), but to what end? What do students say about their own participation, and its relation to institutional structures and practices?
    34. 34. Assessment of Service and Civic Engagement (ASCE) n
    35. 35. Assessment of Service & Civic Engagement (ASCE) The goals of the study are to: 1. Provide an assessment tool to assess (on the institutional level) a. frequency, type, duration, motivations for, obstacles to, civic engagement activity on the part of students b. effects of institutionalization on student service and civic engagement experiences. 2. Generate individual level data that will allow institutions to draw conclusions about student sub-sets, and the student body as a whole, for internal and external descriptive data needs like marketing, accreditation, and strategic planning. 3. Create a national benchmark data-set for comparative analysis of civic engagement in higher education (of students and of institutions).
    36. 36. ASCE
    37. 37. ASCE Service & Structures
    38. 38. ASCE Engagement
    39. 39. ASCE Types of Service Type & Freq
    40. 40. Type Drill Frequency Down Depth
    41. 41. Mode
    42. 42. Institutional Practices
    43. 43. D riv e, B en Tu ef t or it, Fu in 50% n 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% g, dr C a is oa ch er R in el g, ig Yo io 28% ut us h In Lo st ca itu 54% tio 21% lS En ou n vi p ro K nm itc he 11% C en n 48% om ta lC m le un an 39% ity -U 13% Im p pr ov e m 24% 10% en t El H de r 21% ab 8% ita C ar tf or e C H 18% iti um ze 6% ns an hi ity Pu p Pr b 14% lic om Sa ot io fe n ty C 14% 10% am 3% pa So i gn ci 3% al To le 2% ra nc e 3% Sp on s 4% HS vs College or s hi p 3% 1% 1%
    44. 44. Student Satisfaction w/ Service and CE at XYZ College Strongly disagree Strongly agree 7% 12% Disagree 42% Agree 39%
    45. 45. “The strength of a river is in the combined power of its tributaries.” Six Tributaries of the River: Stream One---Community Service CS Stream Two---Service-Learning SL Stream Three---Community Based Research CBR ES Stream Four---Community Partners CP Stream Five---Civic Engagement CE Stream Six---Institutional Practices......Institutional Citizenship TP Admin
    46. 46. Individual Individual Acts of Charity and Service Faculty Allies Interested Community Agencies Research Projects Program Evaluations Needs Assessment CS CP SL CBR ES CE TP Admin Integrated AND Institutionalized Service ----> Social Change
    47. 47. CS Outcome vs. Outcomes. desired outcomes. SL CBR Activity toward a Outcomes desired outcome, assessment results CE or plan used to inform implementation. planning. CP ES Planning strategy to TP achieve desired goal. Admin
    48. 48. Outcome vs. Logical, Developmental Plans CS Outcomes. desired outcomes. + Continuous Assessment Activity toward + Continuous Plan Revision a desired Outcomes outcome, or assessment results used to Strategic Planning SL plan implementation inform . planning. 1. Assess where you are. CBR Planning strategy to achieve desired goal. 2. Discern next steps to move forward. CE Development of each 3. Develop a plan of CP must be strategically action. planned. 4. Implement plan. ES 5. Assess progress towards outcomes. TP 6. Revise or develop a new plan. Admin
    49. 49. CS Outcome vs. Outcomes. desired outcomes. SL CBR Activity toward a Faculty Outcomes desired outcome, & assessment results CE or plan used to inform implementation. SL planning. CP ES Planning strategy to TP achieve desired goal. Admin
    50. 50. CS Strategic Plan Part 1 Campus Master Strategic Plan for Strategic Plan Part 2 CE Strategic Plan Part 4 SL Community Engagement CBR Strategic Plan Part 3 Infra CP Strategic Plan Part 5 Strategic Plan Part 9 of S ES Strategic Plan Part 6 Institutional Citizenship TP Strategic Plan Part 7 Strategic Plan Part 10 Admin Strategic Plan Part 8
    51. 51. CS Strategic Plan Part 1 Campus Master Strategic Plan for Strategic Plan Part 2 CE Strategic Plan Part 4 SL Community Engagement CBR Strategic Plan Part 3 Infra CP Strategic Plan Part 5 Strategic Plan Part 9 of S ES Strategic Plan Part 6 Institutional Citizenship TP Strategic Plan Part 7 Strategic Plan Part 10 Admin Strategic Plan Part 8
    52. 52. CS Strategic Plan Part 1 Campus Master Strategic Plan for Strategic Plan Part 2 CE Strategic Plan Part 4 SL Community Engagement CBR Strategic Plan Part 3 Infra CP Strategic Plan Part 5 Strategic Plan Part 9 of S ES Strategic Plan Part 6 Institutional Citizenship TP Strategic Plan Part 7 Strategic Plan Part 10 Admin Strategic Plan Part 8
    53. 53. DEEP Service Model Infrastructure:   Capacity Building:  Multi-faceted:  Developmental Commitment:  Integrated:  Contextualized:  
    54. 54. DEEP SERVICE INFRASTRUCTURE COMMUNITY PARTNERS
    55. 55. DEEP SERVICE INFRASTRUCTURE OCCASIONAL VOLUNTEERS: GOOD ACTS CHARITY DRIVES AND --ATHONS (CURRENT FCSA) COMMUNITY PARTNERS
    56. 56. DEEP SERVICE INFRASTRUCTURE VISTA (15): OCCASIONAL POST-GRADUATE VOLUNTEERS: FULL-TIME GOOD ACTS ACADEMICALLY GROUNDED CHARITY ANTI-POVERTY DRIVES AND --ATHONS CAPACITY BUILDING (CURRENT FCSA) (YALITZA) COMMUNITY PARTNERS
    57. 57. DEEP SERVICE INFRASTRUCTURE VISTA (15): OCCASIONAL POST-GRADUATE BONNER (60): VOLUNTEERS: FULL-TIME LONG TERM DEVELOPMENTAL GOOD ACTS ACADEMICALLY GROUNDED ACADEMICALLY INTEGRATED CHARITY ANTI-POVERTY SERVICE PLACEMENTS DRIVES AND --ATHONS CAPACITY BUILDING (GRETCHEN) (CURRENT FCSA) (YALITZA) COMMUNITY PARTNERS
    58. 58. DEEP SERVICE INFRASTRUCTURE VISTA (15): OCCASIONAL POST-GRADUATE BONNER (60): VOLUNTEERS: FULL-TIME LONG TERM DEVELOPMENTAL GOOD ACTS ACADEMICALLY GROUNDED ACADEMICALLY INTEGRATED CHARITY ANTI-POVERTY SERVICE PLACEMENTS DRIVES AND --ATHONS CAPACITY BUILDING (GRETCHEN) (CURRENT FCSA) (YALITZA) RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY >800K PARTNERS
    59. 59. DEEP SERVICE INFRASTRUCTURE VISTA (15): OCCASIONAL POST-GRADUATE BONNER (60): VOLUNTEERS: FULL-TIME LONG TERM DEVELOPMENTAL GOOD ACTS ACADEMICALLY GROUNDED ACADEMICALLY INTEGRATED CHARITY ANTI-POVERTY SERVICE PLACEMENTS DRIVES AND --ATHONS CAPACITY BUILDING (GRETCHEN) (CURRENT FCSA) (YALITZA) RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY >800K PARTNERS ADVOCACY: POLICY ACTIVISM SOCIAL CHANGE
    60. 60. DEEP SERVICE INFRASTRUCTURE VISTA (15): OCCASIONAL POST-GRADUATE BONNER (60): VOLUNTEERS: FULL-TIME LONG TERM DEVELOPMENTAL GOOD ACTS ACADEMICALLY GROUNDED ACADEMICALLY INTEGRATED CHARITY ANTI-POVERTY SERVICE PLACEMENTS DRIVES AND --ATHONS CAPACITY BUILDING (GRETCHEN) (CURRENT FCSA) (YALITZA) RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY >800K PARTNERS ADVOCACY: POLICY NETWORKING: ACTIVISM BUILDING SOCIAL CAPITAL SOCIAL CHANGE
    61. 61. DEEP SERVICE INFRASTRUCTURE VISTA (15): OCCASIONAL POST-GRADUATE BONNER (60): VOLUNTEERS: FULL-TIME LONG TERM DEVELOPMENTAL GOOD ACTS ACADEMICALLY GROUNDED ACADEMICALLY INTEGRATED CHARITY ANTI-POVERTY SERVICE PLACEMENTS DRIVES AND --ATHONS CAPACITY BUILDING (GRETCHEN) (CURRENT FCSA) (YALITZA) RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY >800K PARTNERS ADVOCACY: POLICY TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE NETWORKING: ACTIVISM BUILDING SOCIAL CAPITAL SOCIAL CHANGE
    62. 62. DEEP SERVICE INFRASTRUCTURE VISTA (15): OCCASIONAL POST-GRADUATE BONNER (60): VOLUNTEERS: FULL-TIME LONG TERM DEVELOPMENTAL GOOD ACTS ACADEMICALLY GROUNDED ACADEMICALLY INTEGRATED CHARITY ANTI-POVERTY SERVICE PLACEMENTS DRIVES AND --ATHONS CAPACITY BUILDING (GRETCHEN) (CURRENT FCSA) (YALITZA) ASL/CBR (20): ACADEMIC SERVICE LEARNING RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY BASED RESEARCH COMMUNITY >800K (LAUREN) PARTNERS ADVOCACY: POLICY TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE NETWORKING: ACTIVISM BUILDING SOCIAL CAPITAL SOCIAL CHANGE
    63. 63. DEEP SERVICE INFRASTRUCTURE VISTA (15): OCCASIONAL POST-GRADUATE BONNER (60): VOLUNTEERS: FULL-TIME LONG TERM DEVELOPMENTAL GOOD ACTS ACADEMICALLY GROUNDED ACADEMICALLY INTEGRATED CHARITY ANTI-POVERTY SERVICE PLACEMENTS DRIVES AND --ATHONS CAPACITY BUILDING (GRETCHEN) (CURRENT FCSA) (YALITZA) ASL/CBR (20): ACADEMIC SERVICE LEARNING RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY BASED RESEARCH COMMUNITY >800K (LAUREN) PARTNERS ADVOCACY: POLICY TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE NETWORKING: ACTIVISM BUILDING SOCIAL CAPITAL SOCIAL CHANGE
    64. 64. DEEP SERVICE INFRASTRUCTURE ASL/CBR: ACADEMIC SERVICE LEARNING, COMMUNITY COMMUNITY PARTNERS BASED RESEARCH
    65. 65. DEEP SERVICE INFRASTRUCTURE VISTA: POST-GRADUATE, FULL-TIME, ACADEMICALLY GROUNDED, ANTI-POVERTY , CAPACITY BUILDING VISTA ASL/CBR: ACADEMIC SERVICE LEARNING, COMMUNITY COMMUNITY PARTNERS BASED RESEARCH
    66. 66. DEEP SERVICE INFRASTRUCTURE VISTA: POST-GRADUATE, FULL-TIME, ACADEMICALLY GROUNDED, ANTI-POVERTY , CAPACITY BUILDING VISTA BONNER: BONNER LONG TERM DEVELOPMENTAL, ACADEMICALLY INTEGRATED SERVICE PLACEMENTS BONNER BONNER BONNER ASL/CBR: ACADEMIC SERVICE LEARNING, COMMUNITY COMMUNITY PARTNERS BASED RESEARCH
    67. 67. DEEP SERVICE INFRASTRUCTURE VISTA: POST-GRADUATE, FULL-TIME, ACADEMICALLY GROUNDED, ANTI-POVERTY , CAPACITY BUILDING VISTA BONNER: BONNER LONG TERM DEVELOPMENTAL, ACADEMICALLY INTEGRATED SERVICE PLACEMENTS BONNER OCCASIONAL VOLUNTEERS: BONNER GOOD ACTS, CHARITY, DRIVES AND --ATHONS BONNER ASL/CBR: ACADEMIC SERVICE LEARNING, COMMUNITY COMMUNITY PARTNERS BASED RESEARCH OCCASIONAL VOLUNTEERS
    68. 68. DEEP SERVICE INFRASTRUCTURE VISTA: POST-GRADUATE, FULL-TIME, ACADEMICALLY GROUNDED, ANTI-POVERTY , CAPACITY BUILDING VISTA BONNER: BONNER LONG TERM DEVELOPMENTAL, ACADEMICALLY INTEGRATED SERVICE PLACEMENTS BONNER OCCASIONAL VOLUNTEERS: BONNER GOOD ACTS, CHARITY, DRIVES AND --ATHONS BONNER ASL/CBR: ACADEMIC ADVOCACY: SERVICE POLICY, ACTIVISM, SOCIAL CHANGE LEARNING, COMMUNITY COMMUNITY PARTNERS BASED RESEARCH OCCASIONAL VOLUNTEERS
    69. 69. DEEP SERVICE INFRASTRUCTURE VISTA: POST-GRADUATE, FULL-TIME, ACADEMICALLY GROUNDED, ANTI-POVERTY , CAPACITY BUILDING VISTA BONNER: BONNER LONG TERM DEVELOPMENTAL, ACADEMICALLY INTEGRATED SERVICE PLACEMENTS BONNER OCCASIONAL VOLUNTEERS: BONNER GOOD ACTS, CHARITY, DRIVES AND --ATHONS BONNER ASL/CBR: ACADEMIC ADVOCACY: SERVICE POLICY, ACTIVISM, SOCIAL CHANGE LEARNING, COMMUNITY COMMUNITY PARTNERS BASED NETWORKING: BUILDING SOCIAL CAPITAL OCCASIONAL RESEARCH VOLUNTEERS
    70. 70. DEEP SERVICE INFRASTRUCTURE VISTA: POST-GRADUATE, FULL-TIME, ACADEMICALLY GROUNDED, ANTI-POVERTY , CAPACITY BUILDING VISTA BONNER: BONNER LONG TERM DEVELOPMENTAL, ACADEMICALLY INTEGRATED SERVICE PLACEMENTS BONNER OCCASIONAL VOLUNTEERS: BONNER GOOD ACTS, CHARITY, DRIVES AND --ATHONS BONNER ASL/CBR: ACADEMIC ADVOCACY: SERVICE POLICY, ACTIVISM, SOCIAL CHANGE LEARNING, COMMUNITY COMMUNITY PARTNERS BASED NETWORKING: BUILDING SOCIAL CAPITAL OCCASIONAL RESEARCH VOLUNTEERS TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE
    71. 71. DEEP SERVICE INFRASTRUCTURE VISTA: POST-GRADUATE, FULL-TIME, ACADEMICALLY GROUNDED, ANTI-POVERTY , CAPACITY BUILDING VISTA BONNER: BONNER LONG TERM DEVELOPMENTAL, ACADEMICALLY INTEGRATED SERVICE PLACEMENTS BONNER OCCASIONAL VOLUNTEERS: BONNER GOOD ACTS, CHARITY, DRIVES AND --ATHONS BONNER ASL/CBR: ACADEMIC ADVOCACY: SERVICE POLICY, ACTIVISM, SOCIAL CHANGE LEARNING, COMMUNITY COMMUNITY PARTNERS BASED NETWORKING: BUILDING SOCIAL CAPITAL OCCASIONAL RESEARCH VOLUNTEERS TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT
    72. 72. WHAT IS NEXT? INFRASTRUCTURE ASL 210: THEORY AND PRACTICE OF ASL I ASL 310: THEORY AND PRACTICE OF ASL II FOUNDATIONS SEQUENCE ASSISTANTS ASCE AVAILABLE TO YOU!
    73. 73. Sirianni: Investing in Democracy: Engaging Citizens in Collaborative Governance
    74. 74. What Gov’t (HE) Can Do. 1. Co-produce public goods…..(Public Health, Safety, Ecosystems, Policy) 2. Asset-Based Community Development…..(build and develop strengths) 3. Sharing Professional Expertise......(mentoring, capacity building) 4. Deliberative Democracy…..(individual interest to public interest) 5. Policy that Incentivizes Partnerships Between Organizations (co-cur and cur, fac. and student, partners and departments) 6. Policy that Strategically Builds Fields of Civic Participation (rewards) 7. Culture of Organizations Should Invite Participation (student leadership) 8. Ensure Reciprocal Accountability
    75. 75. Students w/ Gen Y Attributes + Faculty in need of training in the “field”, support infrastructure + Community Partners w/ GAPs that prevent CI + New Insights form ASCE = Need for DEEP Service to 1. Maximize use of Gen Y talents 2. Support faculty through infrastructure of integrated service 3. Provide CI services to CBOs 4. Galvanize the field/movement and truly transcend the classroom
    76. 76. The Future of Service Learning New Solutions for Sustaining and Improving Practice Edited by Jean R. Strait, Marybeth Lima Foreword by Andrew Furco Stylus Press

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