Social housing jurgen rosemann

5,102 views

Published on

0 Comments
3 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
5,102
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3,462
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
91
Comments
0
Likes
3
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Social housing jurgen rosemann

  1. 1. Prof. Jürgen Rosemann Ir. Wang Chiu‐Yuan(Social) HousingApproaches and Experiences from Europe and Asia 1
  2. 2. The Housing Question:• The capitalistic system (the market) is  unable to provide the working class  with  sufficient and affordable houses.• The Bourgeoisie solves the problem by  offering bad, overcrowded and unhealthy  housing conditions.• Bad housing conditions are increasing  because of the sudden inflow of the  population to the big cities. 2 Friedrich Engels: About the Housing Question   1872/73
  3. 3. 3
  4. 4. The New Housing Question:• How to provide the urban poor with  acceptable and affordable shelter?• How to combat social contradictions and  segregation?• How to generate a more integrated urban  society? 4
  5. 5. • To Buy or to Rent• To concentrate on the urban poor or to integrate  different social classes 5
  6. 6. 1. To Buy or to RentOwner‐Occupied Social Housing Rental Social Housing • Subsidized by the government•Provide land and basic housing facilities for free • Controlled rent level or•Offer low prized (subsidized)  • Owned and managed by Non‐houses for sale Profit Organizations (Housing  Associations, Housing  or Corporations, Foundations, •Offer financial support and/or  Housing Co‐operatives)tax reduction for owner‐occupied housing • Distributed according to  social criteria 6
  7. 7. 1. To Buy or to RentOwner‐Occupied Social Housing Problems: Large areas for poor people: • Segregation – prisoner  effect • Bad facilities and bad  infrastructure • No attention for public  space • Bad maintenanceSantiago de Chile • Security problems 7
  8. 8. 1. To Buy or to Rent Exception: Owner‐Occupied Social Housing Public Housing in Singapore • Development of complete  Townships by Housing  Development Board (HDB) • Maintenance of Housing  Blocks, Public Space and  Facilities by HDB • Collective Housing  Improvement organized  and subsidized by HDB 8
  9. 9. 2. Target GroupsSocial Housing accessible only  Social Housing accessible for the urban poor: for wide levels of the society:• Low rent • Higher rent (individual • Low production costs – aid for poor people) low quality • Higher costs – higher • High subsidies per unit quality• Limited number of units  • Lower subsidies per unit  (limited public means) • Large number of units• Stigmatized areas:  • Integrated areas: living  concentration of poor  together of different  people ‐ segregation social classes 9
  10. 10. 2. Target GroupsSocial Housing accessible only  Social Housing accessible for the urban poor: for wide levels of the society: 10 Paris/La Courneuve ‐ France Berlin ‐ Germany
  11. 11. The Case of The NetherlandsHousing Act from 1901:• Housing as a right for everybody and its provision as an  obligation of the society• Control of the housing stock and limitations for private  landlords• Establishing of urban planning (extension plans for  municipalities with more than 10.000 inhabitants)• Introduction of the social housing system 11
  12. 12. The Case of The Netherlands 12
  13. 13. The Case of The Netherlands Dutch Housing Stock in 2009  13
  14. 14. Housing Management and Organization• Almost all social housing units in the Netherlands are owned  by non‐profit Housing Corporations, acting as financially  independent entrepreneurs with social objectives and  obligations.• Housing Corporations exist in two legal forms: • Housing Associations • Housing Foundations• Housing Corporations (Associations and Foundations) are  working under supervision of the national and local  governments.• Housing Corporations are obliged to reinvest their surplus into  housing. 14
  15. 15. Housing Management and Organization• On national level Housing Corporations own 34 % of the total  housing stock and 75 % of the rental housing stock.• Housing Corporations are no longer limited to the  development of Social Housing units. They also are allowed to  develop mixed areas, integrating Social Housing, Owner  Occupied Housing and even commercial functions.• Recently the Housing Corporations in Amsterdam are  responsible for the development of 60 – 70 % of the annual  housing production in the city. Half of the units belong to the  Social Housing sector.• The sale of Owner Occupied Housing became an important  source of income to finance affordable Social Housing units. 15
  16. 16. Financial System• Financial Framework of Social Housing Social Social Housing Housing Local Local Guarante Guarante Bank Bank Government Government Fund Fund Housing Housing Corporation Corporation State State Central Central Housing Housing Tenant Tenant Fund Fund Own Financial Means Own Financial Means 16
  17. 17. Individual Aidcosts 0 exploitation 50 years 17Social Housing: Costs, Exploitation and Subsidies
  18. 18. 18Social Housing: Long‐Range Exploitation
  19. 19. Integration and Differentiation 19
  20. 20. Integration and Differentiation 20
  21. 21. The Idea of Differentiated Housing Milieu’s• Housing no longer has to focus on the (statistical) average.  The city is a collection of minorities, each of them with special  demands, priorities and wishes.• Housing has to be differentiated according to different life‐ styles, different patterns of behavior and different value  systems.• The combination of compatible life‐styles is able to bridge  social contradictions and to contribute to social integration.• To generate an integrated urban society, social housing has to  be combined with owner occupied housing and with other  urban functions.• The combination with owner occupied housing and with  commercial functions can generate additional means to  21 improve the quality of social housing.
  22. 22. Differentiated Housing Mileu’s Transformation of the  former Water Works in  Amsterdam •300 units Social Housing •150 units Owner  Occupied (subsidized) •150 units Owner  Occupied (non‐subsidized) •Small enterprize,  restaurant etc. 22
  23. 23. Towards a new  social Integration The Transformation of the former Waterworks in Amsterdam 23
  24. 24. 26
  25. 25. 27
  26. 26. Differentiated Housing Milieu’s Restructuring of the  Eastern Docklands in  Amsterdam •Public Private  Partnership between  Municipality, Social  Housing Associations  and private Developers •Ca. 5.600 units •50 % Social Housing •50 % Private Housing 28
  27. 27. Amsterdam Eastern Docklands
  28. 28. Differentiated Housing Milieu’s Rehabilitation of the Bijlmer  housing area in Amsterdam •Origin: monofunctional  social housing area with  17.000 units • Ca. 9.000 units in high rise  buildings have been  demolished •The remaining blocks have  been renovated and  differentiated. •New terraced houses and  single family houses have  been integrated. 36
  29. 29. 38
  30. 30. 41
  31. 31. The Case of Singapore:Public Housing Program• 84 % of the housing stock in Singapore is developed in the  framework of the Public Housing Program.• An important aim of the Public Housing Program in Singapore  is to generate identity and committment in the multicultural  society.• Most of the Public Housing units are sold to the residents.  Less than 10 % is rental.• The Public Housing Program covers a wide range of different  housing types and sizes for different household types and  different income groups. • The Public Housing areas are developed and maintained by  the Housing Development Board (HDB).• Also the modernization and housing improvement is  45 organized by HDB in a collective way.
  32. 32. Public Housing Program 46
  33. 33. 47
  34. 34. 48
  35. 35. 49
  36. 36. 50
  37. 37. 51
  38. 38. 52
  39. 39. 53
  40. 40. 54
  41. 41. Conclusions:• Social integration is a key issue of urban culture and urban identity.• Social housing can ease the social contradictions, can support a more  integrated – more harmonious – urban society and in this way can  contribute to the sustainability of the city.• However, social housing is not a singular solution. It has to be embedded in a differentiated and on the same time integrating housing  policy  that makes the city accessible and worth living for everybody.• The quality of design is a decisive factor to make the living‐together of  different social classes acceptable, thus social integration possible.• There is no general receipt for Social Housing. Social housing always has  to be adapted to local conditions and changing demands. 55

×