Food and Drinks of the Renaissance Paola Mendoza Period 3
Feasts <ul><li>A feast was something so much more - even our modern day attempts at medieval banquets fall way short of th...
Time to Eat! <ul><li>Everyone had a specific time to eat. </li></ul><ul><li>The Lords ate their breakfast between 6 to 7 i...
Food by Social Class  <ul><li>A lord's dinner usually had two to three courses </li></ul><ul><li>Mainly meats and pastries...
What the Lords ate <ul><li>Foods and diets depended much on the class of the individual. The higher people had a wide rang...
What the Peasants ate  <ul><li>Medieval peasants, on the other hand, had a much simpler diet available to them. </li></ul>...
The Seasons <ul><li>Season also plays a big part in what shows up on the table.  </li></ul><ul><li>The pigs are slaughtere...
Mmm…That’s Spicy! <ul><li>Spices are critical and of great value.  </li></ul><ul><li>Not so much to cover the taste of spo...
Work Cited <ul><li>Food Timeline FAQs: Mesopotamia through Shakespeare  N.p., n.d. Web. 7 Dec. 2009. <http://www.foodtimel...
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Paolap3PowerpointFood and drink of the renaissance

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Food and drinks of the renaissance

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Paolap3PowerpointFood and drink of the renaissance

  1. 1. Food and Drinks of the Renaissance Paola Mendoza Period 3
  2. 2. Feasts <ul><li>A feast was something so much more - even our modern day attempts at medieval banquets fall way short of the mark. </li></ul><ul><li>Beef, pork, mutton, venison, poultry, fish, eggs, bread, milk, cheeses, vegetables. </li></ul><ul><li>A profusion of wine, ale, cider, and mead were in ample supply. </li></ul>http://www.castles-of-britain.com/castlesf.htm
  3. 3. Time to Eat! <ul><li>Everyone had a specific time to eat. </li></ul><ul><li>The Lords ate their breakfast between 6 to 7 in the morning. While the peasants ate theirs at sunrise. </li></ul><ul><li>Dinner for the Lords was between 11 in the morning and 2 in the afternoon. For the peasants it would be more like a &quot;ploughman's lunch&quot; because it was eaten in the fields while they worked between 11 and 12 noon. </li></ul><ul><li>Supper was eaten between 6 and 7 in the evening </li></ul>http://www.renaissance-spell.com/Images/Renaissance-Food/Renaissance-Food-Kitchen.jpg
  4. 4. Food by Social Class <ul><li>A lord's dinner usually had two to three courses </li></ul><ul><li>Mainly meats and pastries, bread, wine or ale fruits, cheeses, nuts, and the like. </li></ul><ul><li>The basic diet of the peasant consisted of carbohydrates in the form of grain, mostly barley and oats, which were baked or brewed into bread and ale </li></ul>The Bean Eater, Annibale Carracci, 1585. http://www.lepg.org/food.html
  5. 5. What the Lords ate <ul><li>Foods and diets depended much on the class of the individual. The higher people had a wide range of foods available. </li></ul><ul><li>Fowl such as capons, geese, larks, and chickens were usually available to the lord and his family. They would also dine on other meats; beef, bacon, lamb </li></ul><ul><li>Wealthy society could afford large quantities of milled flour and other meals made from grain. </li></ul><ul><li>Dairy products such as cheese and butter could be seen on the manor table. </li></ul>http://www.godecookery.com/afeast/dining/din036.jpg
  6. 6. What the Peasants ate <ul><li>Medieval peasants, on the other hand, had a much simpler diet available to them. </li></ul><ul><li>Most of the wheat they harvested went to the market, and breads were made from barley and rye, baked into dark heavy loaves. </li></ul><ul><li>Ales made from barley would quaff the thirst, as would water drawn from the well, sweetened with honey. </li></ul><ul><li>Peasant society got their proteins they could from peas and beans that would be added to bread and pottage. </li></ul>http://www.beautifulbaroque.com/images/bruegel_peasant_wedding.jpg
  7. 7. The Seasons <ul><li>Season also plays a big part in what shows up on the table. </li></ul><ul><li>The pigs are slaughtered in December, and their remains are preserved as sausage, bacon, etc. and eaten until spring. </li></ul><ul><li>Food which was harvested and preserved in late summer and </li></ul><ul><li>fall is often gone, and it is too early yet for new crops. </li></ul><ul><li>The lambing season comes in December just in the nick of time! </li></ul>http://www.wga.hu/art/b/beuckela/kitchen.jpg
  8. 8. Mmm…That’s Spicy! <ul><li>Spices are critical and of great value. </li></ul><ul><li>Not so much to cover the taste of spoiled meat as the popular wisdom has it, but more to counteract all the salt and the bland taste of shoe-leather quality meat boiled in the pot all day. </li></ul><ul><li>Medieval people did not value &quot;taste&quot; in quite the same way that we do -- food was appreciated more for its appearance, its symbolic value, or its rarity </li></ul>http://blog.khymos.org/wp-content/2007/02/whole-spices.jpg
  9. 9. Work Cited <ul><li>Food Timeline FAQs: Mesopotamia through Shakespeare N.p., n.d. Web. 7 Dec. 2009. <http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodfaq3.html#feast#feast >. </li></ul><ul><li>Food and Drink in Medieval England N.p., n.d. Web. 7 Dec. 2009. <http://www.historylearningsite.co.uk/food_and_drink_in_medieval_engla.htm >. </li></ul><ul><li>Food N.p., n.d. Web. 4 Dec. 2009. <http://www.lepg.org/food.htm >. </li></ul><ul><li>Langley, Andrew. Medieval Life . New York: Dorling Kindersley Publishing, Inc., 1996. 12-13. Print </li></ul><ul><li>Hodge, Susie. Medieval Europe . Milwaukee: Gareth Stevens Publishing, 2005. Print. </li></ul><ul><li>&quot;Food and Drink.&quot; Renaissance . 2002th ed. New York: Kindersley publishing Inc., 2002. Print. </li></ul>

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