Presented By:Supported By:
Get Education, Information, and the      Tools to Get Out and Explore Winter!Speaker:Graham Gephart
Why Snowshoeing?It’s a fun, low-impact, highly aerobic sport that allows you to getoutside with friends and family to expe...
Why Snowshoeing?• A new variable for hikers: snow!• Smoothes out rough, brushy terrain from summer• Quiet, beautiful, sere...
Why Snowshoeing?Helps you stay active, stay healthy - whetheryou go for a workout or just for fun.Calories Burned/Hour at ...
All About SnowshoesChoosing the right product for your winter adventures!   • Understanding the different kinds of snowsho...
All About SnowshoesToday’s snowshoes have modernmaterials, lighter weight, bettertraction and more efficiency fortravel.Sn...
All About Snowshoes                                           aluminum                                           frameF. –...
All About Snowshoes                                          Atlas Spring-Loaded                                          ...
All About Snowshoes                                                                    easy to pull                       ...
All About Snowshoes                     basic toe cramponF.A.                       basic heel traction                   ...
How to Choose the Right SnowshoeThree Simple Questions1. What is your Gender?2. What is your intended use?3. What is your ...
How to Choose the Right Snowshoe1. What is your Gender?   This narrows down whether to look at men’s or women’s products, ...
How to Choose the Right Snowshoe2. What is your intended use?        Snowshoes are designed with different features for di...
How to Choose the Right Snowshoe3. What is your total weight with gear?    Snowshoes are a balance between flotation and m...
DRESSING FOR WINTER                     How to stay           comfortable, warm, and dry out in                      the s...
What to Wear?What is Comfort?   • Personal Perception – everyone   has a different perception of   when they are and aren’...
How to Stay Warm and Dry?Being comfortable is a matter of balance. Theamount of heat your body produces has tomatch the he...
The Key to Comfort: Waterproof, breathablesystems and flexibility withlayers.   • Manage moisture from within,   while pro...
Keys to Staying ComfortableThe VIP EquationVentilation + Insulation + Protection = ComfortHow can clothing help manage hea...
Maximum Breathability – Wicking BaselayersStop overheating! Breathability and wicking are the most efficientways for the b...
Midlayer – Insulation Choose a midlayer option depending on your climate and   snowshoeing needs. WINDSTOPPER® materials o...
Keeping the Elements at Bay – Outerwear  • Outerwear has to do it all – it’s  your main line of defense against  the weath...
The GORE-TEX® Menu – Options for Outerwear• Waterproof, breathable outerwear offers versatility for all of winter’s condit...
Head and Hands – The Body’s RadiatorsGORE-TEX® Comfort Science:   • The concentration of sweat glands on the hands and   h...
These Boots Were Made for Walkin’What kind of footwear works best for snowshoeing?                           OR
These Boots Were Made for Walkin’Snowshoe footwear is designed for performance with activity, usingthe same concepts of wa...
Which Category Fits You?Like snowshoes, footwear choicesreflect what kind of snowshoeing     Standard Hikeryou want to do!...
Footwear & Apparel Care and Maintenance• Winter wear is an investment. Treat your gear right to prolong  its lifetime of u...
Footwear & Apparel Care                Dirty                                            waterproof/breathand Maintenance  ...
GETTING OUT THEREResources and information to get       started on snow!    Presented By:
Fuel for Your AdventuresTips for the snowshoe gourmand:   • Snack as you go for continued     energy.   • Put on a hat or ...
Fuel for Your AdventuresHydration is just as important as energy.Staying hydrated helps:   • Keep extremities warm by high...
10 EssentialsYour hiking essentials work for snowshoeing too!1.   Map                    6. Sunglasses and sunscreen2.   C...
Safety BasicsFor strolling a local park or exploring in the mountains:1. Dress in layers and use outdoor-appropriate cloth...
Can I Bring the Kids?• Keep outings, especially the first ones, short• Make sure kids have plenty of layers on and help re...
What About Fido, too?• Before getting your pet in the car, confirmthat pets are allowed where you are going• Be respectful...
Trail EtiquetteJust because you can snowshoe whereveryou like.. It’s a good idea:   • Not to walk on groomed ski tracks or...
Getting Going on SnowshoesAscending a Hill:• Kick in & press down to make a step• Go slower and more deliberately on steep...
Getting Going on SnowshoesDescending a Hill:• Shorter steps• Bend your knees, and keep your  weight over your heels• In so...
Getting Going on SnowshoesBreaking Trail: How to blaze a new path• Take turns out front, share the effort.• The 2nd or 3rd...
Getting Going on SnowshoesUsing Poles: Add some extra stability.• Reduce stress on your legs, add upper bodymovement.• Adj...
Getting Out There – Finding Places to GoWhat kind of places can you go snowshoeing?   •   Your neighborhood parks or trail...
Regional Trails to Explore1. Edison Butte Sno-Park – A 4-mile out and back to the Edison   Warming Hut. Easy ability level...
Resources to Find TrailsSnowshoes.com TrailNet Database   •   Over 3,300 user-submitted trails nationwide.   •   Easy to s...
Other Classes and ResourcesREI’s Outdoor School and REI Adventures offer everything fromguided snowshoe outings to rugged ...
Recommended EventsNational Winter Trails Day – January 12, 2013   •   A free trial day for snowshoeing nationwide, perfect...
Recommended EventsTubbs Romp to Stomp Out Breast Cancer Snowshoe Series   •   A fun community event with a 3k or 5k snowsh...
Get Going Snowshoeing!Everything you need to get out there…• Use the resource handouts• Web resources on www.Snowshoes.com...
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Snowshoes.com Get Going! Presentation - Bend, OR

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Whether you're brand new to snowshoeing or an intermediate looking for tips and places to go, the Snowshoes.com Get Going! Workshops provide inspiration & education to become an active, knowledgeable and confident snowshoer! From how to choose the right snowshoe to what to wear, how to snowshoe, and where to find trails and events near you, this presentation will teach you all the essential tools and tricks. Learn about different types of snowshoes and choosing the right one for your activity. Learn about footwear selection and how to dress for warmth and comfort in winter weather, as well as how to keep your gear ready for winter. Learn tips and techniques for getting started snowshoeing, and find out about resources, events, and trails near you to apply your knowledge. All ages and experience levels welcome. Presented by Snowshoes.com, Atlas Snow-Shoe Company, Tubbs Snowshoes, Gore-Tex, Outdoor Research, Arcteryx, Marmot, Vasque, and Nikwax!

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  • Short description of who you are, how you got into snowshoeing, and why you enjoy it. Make personal. Quick agenda: Why Snowshoeing? Snowshoe Construction & How to Choose Dressing for Winter – Footwear, Apparel, & Maintenance Resources to Get Going! – Tips, Techniques, Trails, Events, &Classes
  • One of our inside jokes is that snowshoeing is a 12-step program. Just take 12 steps, and you’re an expert!If you can walk, you can snowshoe. Very little “gear” is required, and there’s no steep learning curve. It’s not about beginner or expert, it’s more where you want to go. Fun, low-impact, highly-aerobic sport. Forge your own path, whether it’s exploring the wilderness of the Rockies or taking a familiar trail in your local park.It requires minimal gear, and no big learning curve.All you need is a pair of snowshoes, some outdoor clothing, a healthy sense of adventure, and a few basic tips.
  • Benefits of hiking on snow:Quiet, beautiful, serene.Smoothes out rough terrainFewer peopleNo bugs!Different perspective on your favorite places.
  • Snowshoeing raises your heart rate and provides an aerobic workout that compares favorably with other activities such as running, swimming, cross-country skiing and bicycling.
  • Now that you’ve heard why snowshoeing is such a great activity, we’ll take a look at snowshoe equipment. Because there are so many different ways you can enjoy snowshoeing, understanding the different types of snowshoes will help you choose the right product for the kind of snowshoeing you’d like to do. There are a lot of snowshoe manufacturers out there, and we’re proud to have support from Atlas and Tubbs in putting on this workshop. We’ll use a couple of their models here tonight to illustrate how snowshoes are made, and tell you a bit about the snowshoe components that you’ll find on all snowshoes that REI carries. A little bit about each brand: Tubbs – founded in 1906 in Norway, ME, trusted guide in snowshoeing. Technology focus on comfort and ergonomics throughout the years.Atlas – founded in 1990 in Berkeley, CA by a Stanford design student. Focus on pinnacle technology for better performance.
  • -Who has a set of wooden snowshoes on their wall?-Who has a set of modern snowshoes?What does a snowshoe do? In its simplest form, a snowshoe gives you more surface area to walk on top of the snow. F.A.C.T. stands for Flotation, Articulation, Comfort, and Traction – the four key elements of snowshoe design. The details of a snowshoe design, and their focus on individual features – like flotation or traction – help differentiate unique designs for any snowshoe activity, from walking down a snow-covered road to backcountry hiking or snowshoe running.
  • Snowshoes come in different sizes to accommodate a wide range of user weights and needs. -Traditional aluminum frame and deck snowshoes come in a range of lengths, from around 21” for smallest women’s snowshoes to 36” for biggest men’s snowshoes.-Some manufacturers also offer compact, plastic (or molded) snowshoes designed as a one-size-fits-all for general trail walking. SHOW SIZE OPTIONS
  • Suspension Systems – A suspension system keeps the snowshoe closer underfoot for maneuverability and lateral flex of the foot on sidehill or rough terrain.Rotating Toe Cords – A rotating toe cord like the one found on the Tubbs Frontier snowshoe lets the tail of the snowshoe drop away with each step, shedding snow and reducing fatigue.The best way to know what works best for you is to try them on and see!SHOW SUSPENSION FLEX AND ROTATING TOE CORD LETTING TAIL FALL
  • Shape – snowshoe frames are ergonomically shaped for the right balance of flotation and maneuverability. Both Atlas and Tubbs have unique women’s snowshoe shapes tapered at the tip and tail to facilitate a woman’s stride. Binding – the heart of the snowshoe. With supportive structure, easy to use webbing and buckles, and secure hold, your snowshoe binding provides comfort, intuitive use and proper support and directional control. Binding designs are probably the single-biggest design differentiation between Atlas and Tubbs and their competitors.SHOW BINDING PULLS, BUCKLE RELEASES, PADDED EVA FOAM
  • SHOW TRACTION OFFERINGS BETWEEN BACKCOUNTRY AND TRAIL WALKING
  • With so many different snowshoes to choose from these days, it can become a daunting task to decide which pair is right for you. There are only 3 simple questions to answer!
  • The truth is, men and women are shaped differently and walk differently. A women's specific snowshoe should include a narrower frame shape to accommodate a woman's narrow stance, as well as a binding that is molded to a women's boot last.Some snowshoes may have more gender-specific features including altered pivot points, arch support or women's cause-related programming.
  • Just like many other outdoor products, the model you buy should reflect what you intend to do with it. Use the F.A.C.T. platform again to better understand how snowshoes are designed to conquer those different tasks: F: Different needs of flotation for deeper backcountry snow, or compact shapes for packed trails.A: Do you need top-notch maneuverability, or is an easy stride more important?C: What binding provides the most comfort for you?T: How much traction do you need for your trails?
  • Having a snowshoe that is too small will cause you to sink deeply into soft snow. A snowshoe that is too large, conversely, will be heavier, but will always provide more float. Always consult the product hangtag, website or a shop employee to learn what the best size for your weight is. And don't forget to add 10-25 lbs. depending on how much gear you plan to take with you!
  • Now that you know about snowshoes, how about what to wear?We’re going to show some footwear and apparel from a number of brands that are supporting these workshops tonight: Arc’teryx, Marmot, Outdoor Research, Merrell and Vasque. REI carries a huge variety of products that you can use for snowshoeing, and you probably have a lot of the stuff you need in your gear closet already. We’ll use some of these products to show what characteristics you should look for in winter apparel and footwear to stay comfortable, illustrate a few examples of how to layer properly for winter, and give you some tips on how to maintain or restore performance in your gear.
  • What you wear is the biggest impact on your comfort. Comfort is a personal perception, and everyone has a different level of comfort. But wet and cold is uncomfortable for just about all!
  • Your body transfers heat in three ways: evaporation, wind chill, and temperature transfer. Staying comfortable comes from your clothing and footwear’s balance of breathability and water protection to help you manage moisture from inside and out!
  • Why is waterproof and breathable so important? Systems of layering allow you add/remove layers depending on your activity level, but most importantly they provide protection and manage your sweat. Has anyone ever used a plastic poncho or rubberized jacket in the rain? Great waterproofing, but what happens when you start to move around? SHOW GORE-TEX MEMBRANE WITH MITT DEMO. Have everyone pull out mitts to show how the Gore-Tex membrane works. Flap hands. Ask audience which one is waterproof. Both are waterproof, but only one is waterproof and breathable. The waterproof/breathable membrane allows the transfer of sweat away from the body while keeping you dry from outside elements. This is used in all Gore-Tex footwear, jackets, gloves, etc.We’ll show you a few more GORE-TEX demos later on, and all the products that we have from our sponsors tonight use GORE-TEX in the apparel and footwear. There a lot of different fabrics and manufacturers on the market, but we trust GORE-TEX a lot because they have one of the longest histories in waterproof/breathable manufacturing, and they tightly control all of the materials and how they’re produced – not just the jacket or boot maker. That’s how Gore-Tex offers their “Guaranteed to Keep You Dry Promise” for the lifetime of the garment.
  • With quick-changing weather, dressing in layers is the safest, most comfortable way to enjoy the outdoors in winter. This gives you the ability to add or remove layers in response to changing conditions.Just like FACT, the VIP equation is the easiest way to think about layering for winter.The base layer is the immediate layer against your skin, and it provides Ventilation – wicking moisture away from your body when you get warm. The mid layer provides a level of insulation for warmth, helps cut down on the chill from wind, and allows moisture to be move further away.The outer layer provides breathability to manage your moisture/sweat from within, but provides Protection from the elements – rain, snow, sleet, hail, wind, and more.
  • Baselayers are the immediate ventilation next to your skin. You want something that breathes easily and wicks sweat away from the body to keep you cool.Cotton is bad for baselayers – it absorbs moisture and dries slowly. Look for synthetic or wool layers, which will wick moisture away. If you never liked wool before, be sure to check out some of the new merino wool base layers – no itch, and less stink. Baselayers come in a variety of weights – for warmer days or people who get hot quickly, lightweight or silkweight layers provide a great next-to-skin feel with best ventilation. Midweight layers are the most versatile, and warmer heavyweight layers (which sometimes have a fleece-like backing) can provide warmth to those who are frequently cold, even when exercising.
  • Midlayer needs depend a lot on the weather where you want to go snowshoeing. Do you need a wind-blocking layer of moderate thickness? A softshell for breathability? Or an insulation layer for extreme cold?Make sure to look for something that will stop wind even when you take your shell off. Gore-Tex’s Windstopper is totally windproof, offering more warmth while keeping the breathability you need to regulate temperature. SHOW WINDSTOPPER DEMOMitt has fleece on one side and WINDSTOPPER on the other. You can feel the air move through the fleece side, but not the WINDSTOPPER side. It keeps the wind from cutting through, even though it still lets all the moisture out. Invite people to come up and try afterward, or use with participants up front.
  • When you think about winter weather, the outwear probably comes to mind as the most important. It has to do the widest range of tasks for you – provide durability, weather protection and breathability. Your other layers are probably optimized to do one of those (ventilation) better than the others. Which is fine if it’s cool, but sunny and dry. But your outerwear has to do it all, and do it all well, because winter conditions change. Your outerwear is what makes sure you can stay comfortable (dry from the inside and out) when it’s 32 degrees, but snowing big, wet snowflakes really heavily.
  • These are a few of the options from Gore-Tex on the outerwear that we have up here. Just like with snowshoes and apparel, match the kind of activities you want to do to the benefits of the product. PacLite – Lightweight, easy to pack, good back-up shell for hiking and snowshoeing. (2-layers – face fabric, membrane)Pro Shell – Ultimate durability for use day-in and day-out. (3 layers – face fabric, membrane, liner)Do you just want a waterproof layer for occasional stormy use? Or do you plan to use this jacket for snowshoeing as well as skiing/snowboarding, rainy walks to the farmer’s market, etc? Why do we trust GORE-TEX so much? No one tests their products like GORE-TEX – before and after production, as a supplier, not the jacket manufacturer.
  • How about your head and hands? These are the temperature regulators for the rest of your body. The same principles apply for waterproofing and breathability – your head and hands sweat more than any other part of your body, but they’re also really vulnerable to getting cold in and out of the snow. SHOW RANGE OF GLOVES/MITTENSHow many of you have cold hands when you’re out hiking? Gloves and mittens run the full range for warmth. In general, mittens will keep your hands warmer than gloves. Look for features like hand-warmer pockets, which will help keep you warm. Having a modular system will also help you “layer” for your hands. If you tend to get really warm out there, look, you can use a lighter liner for climbing, and keep the shell in the your pack for added insulation when you stop. For blustery, cold days, WindStopper hats do an excellent job in keeping your ears away from wind’s chill, while letting moisture and heat vent out.
  • What kind of boot do you think works better for snowshoeing? A big, warm winter boot does a great job keeping you warm when you’re standing around in the cold. But when you go snowshoeing, you’re moving around. Look for weatherized hiking boots with Gore-Tex – lighter weight, breathable when you’re warm, and waterproof to keep you that way!
  • SHOW GORE-TEX BOOTY INSIDE CUT BOOTIf you’re out snowshoeing around, your feet are working the same as your hands. Just like with apparel, match with wicking layers – wool or synthetic socks, no cotton.One difference though – you can always change layers with apparel or gloves, hat, etc. You can’t really delayer your feet, so if you tend to run cold, there’s no harm in erring on the side of a little more warmth.
  • Choosing footwear to match your activity level is important, just as it was with apparel and snowshoes.Vasque Velocity 2.0 GTX Trail Runner – pair with gaitersVasque Breeze 2.0 GTX Hiking boot – mid-height, lightweight, great for all-around use.VasqueTaku GTX Hiking Boot – heavier, more durable boot for more rugged terrain and hiking.The best part of using a winterized option like one of these Vasque GORE-TEX boots is that you can use them for multiple seasons – from winter snowshoeing to all-season hiking, trail running, or just holding up to rainy/muddy spring and fall seasons.
  • How many people here have a waterproof jacket currently? Winter jackets are expensive, but they also last a pretty long time. Over time, they get gummed up with all sorts of stuff. That clogs up the GORE-TEX membrane, and wears down the DWR. A lot of people mistake DWR for waterproofing, but they’re two different things. The DWR coating prevents water from soaking into the face fabric (outside of the jacket) – it’s DWR that is making water bead off a new jacket. That little bit of extra height that DWR keeps the water away from your skin helps keep you warmer. SHOW DWR (DURABLE WATER REPELLANT) DEMO TO SHOW WATER-BEADING AND COLD/WET SENSATION. Spray a little water onto each side of the DWR demo fabric with spray bottle, held on someone’s bare arm. The water will bead off the DWR side, and you can run it into the non DWR side. Ask what they feel. Non-DWR side should feel colder and wet. Both are waterproof, there should be no water underneath. The GORE-TEX membrane is waterproof for both sides of the material. It shows the increase in comfort from keeping the water further away from contact with your skin.
  • So how do you take care of your footwear and apparel? Who here has a GORE-TEX jacket? When was the last time you cleaned it? How do you clean your gear? Companies like Nikwax provide two kinds of products to keep your gear in good working shape – the first is wash to remove the oils, dirts, and other things that accumulate over time. A lot of people ask if they can wash their outerwear. YES! Washing it regularly is necessary to keep the DWR and the membrane in good working order. How often? A couple times a season is fine, especially if you’re using your gear very often or getting it really dirty.The second product is their wash-in treatment line, which is washed in less frequently. Those DWR treatments will reapply a DWR coating to your product to make it bead like new again.Nikwax has been awesome in supporting this workshop series, and they’ve included a few samples in the goody bags that we’re handing out tonight – there’s some footwear cleaning gel, and some leather waterproofing wax for gloves and boots.
  • For the last segment of the presentation tonight, we’ll cover the nuts and bolts of getting out on the trail. Now that you’ve learned about the products for snowshoeing, we’ll make sure we give you plenty of tips, and some ideas on where to go to get started.
  • Don’t forget, it’s most important to pay attention to those layers and your comfort particularly when you stop and cool down. Put on a warm hat and add a layer (down jacket or fleece) even if you’re not cold; it’ll save you from cooling down too much after the heat generated from your previous exertion abates. Sitting directly on snow can rob your body of heat, so if your backpack has a removable foam back pad, pull it out and sit on it during lunch or sit right on your pack, just be careful not to squish any delicate items like your hydration bladder.For food, look for provisions that fit in a pocket so you can nibble as you snowshoe without stopping and taking off your pack. Keeping them in a pocket also helps keep them from freezing.-Energy bars: quick boost, healthier than a candy bar.
  • At higher elevations, drink more water! Avoid caffeine, it causes blood vessels to constrict and is a diuretic.
  • How many of you are hikers again? When you go out for a hiking trip, do you just bring your hiking boots and a water bottle? What else do you bring with you? Does anyone know the 10 essentials? The same essentials that work for hiking work pretty well for snowshoeing too. The 10 essentials are pieces that you should bring whenever you go into the backcountry.Duct tape (will fix almost anything! Roll a bunch around a pen or your snowshoe poles for compact storage.)
  • Whether you choose to stroll around the local parks or snow-covered golf courses, or venture deep into the mountains, here are some safety basics for you to consider:
  • QUESTION – HOW MANY OF YOU HAVE KIDS THAT YOU WANT TO TAKE SNOWSHOEING?It’s important that kids have a great time out the first time. Adjust your expectations for time, distance, effort appropriately. Snowshoeing with younger kids is more often about playing in the snow than going any distance. Help them regulate their temperatures – it’s the worst to be walking around sweating or freezing so help them figure this out! Games help to pass the time and can be a fun way to learn new things
  • Not everyone is as comfortable around your animal as you are so make sure to let kids know if it’s ok to come right up to pet your dog or if they need to give it a bit more room.
  • Snowshoeing in tracks can make it frustrating and dangerous for skiers when snow clumps up and makes the formerly smooth tracks clumpy and uneven. This is why snowshoers and cross country skiers sometimes don’t get along.
  • There really is no learning curve from beginner to expert with your snowshoes, just a scale of where you want to go. Still, if you've never tried snowshoeing there are a couple small adjustments. Here are a few useful tips for getting started snowshoeing: Some snowshoes offer heel lifts for climbing steeper terrain. Raising the heel lift bar reduces calf fatigue by keeping your foot more level, and often improves traction while climbing by weight pressuring the rear traction.Keep your weight on your forefoot, and use snowshoe poles for added balance and support.
  • If you're using longer length snowshoes, remember to make shorter strides to keep the longer tail of the snowshoe from levering on the snow as it makes contact. Snowshoes with turned up tails will roll through the stride more comfortably. If your snowshoes start to slide in soft spring or summer snow, spread out your stance fore and aft and glide your way to the bottom. Using poles helps provide additional points of contact for an even easier descent.
  • While snowshoes keep you from sinking really deep in the snow, breaking trail does require a little more effort than walking on an already-packed down trail.For efficient travel when breaking trail, pick up your foot until the nose of the snowshoe clears the snow, and move it forward with your next step. You'll expend extra energy pulling the entire snowshoe out of the snow or not lifting higher than the new snow.Walk in a single line, with the leader breaking trail. Take turns out front, and remember to set a courteous track.
  • Poles help stabilize the upper body, establishing a rhythm to your walk or hike and improving your balance and stability on difficult terrain. Using poles also reduces stress on your knees, ankles and feet, and gives a more full-body workout by including upper-body movement.Don’t forget to check your goody bags! Both Atlas and Tubbs have free poles with purchase offers in your goody bags for the end of the workshop. Just mail them to the manufacturer, and you’ll be all set to go!
  • When you leave here tonight, you’ll know all about snowshoeing equipment, and the basics of how to get out there. But what’s your next big question? Where do I go snowshoeing?If you’re a skier or a snowboarder, the places to go are obvious… ski resorts. But snowshoeing is like hiking; there’s a huge winter world of possibilities all around us.
  • PLEASE INPUT LOCAL TRAILS HERE. ALL SPEAKERS EXPECTED TO PREPARE 3-4 OPTIONS AND BE READY TO SPEAK TO THEM.
  • How many people here have ever been to Snowshoes.com?Snowshoes.com was launched last year in a partnership by Atlas and Tubbs to create a single online resource for the snowshoeing community, with trails, events listings, blog, and community forum. The databases for trails and events are searchable, and anyone can review trails or add new ones to them.  The Snowshoes.comTrailNet database is dedicated to just snowshoeing, and it has over 3300 snowshoe trails!You can search for a trail by keyword/name if you’re trying to find something specific. My favorite function is the browse trails, just double-click on the map to find bring up all trails within a 50-mile radius of the location. Trails are marked in the database for the trailhead, with directions, descriptions and other information all from the submitting user. Once you try a trail, you can rate it, and add your own trip report to it with comments, stories, and photos. It’s a really great way to share current information for others looking to get started.
  • REI offers great experiences through their Outdoor School and through REI Adventures. It’s an easy way to get started, with classes and outings to help practice some of tonight’s information. You can go on a local trip, and then dream big for something like their snowshoeing through Bryce Canyon National Park over New Year’s. REI also offers some more great classes that might be a good addition to getting out there. For those looking to head off the beaten path, check out REI’s courses on GPS and their introductions to Avalanche Awareness for more on winter travel. How many of you would feel comfortable going out snowshoeing on your own with everything you’ve learned tonight? If you’ve never gone snowshoeing before, would you feel more comfortable if you could go snowshoeing with other people in a safe, easy environment? There are a ton of great events out there for whatever you want to try, from group walks to moonlight snowshoe tours, fun runs, and benefit events.
  • National Winter Trails Day is a free day of snowshoeing and cross country skiing at almost 100 resorts and Nordic centers nationwide. It’s perfect for families and anyone who’s new to winter sports. Atlas, Tubbs, and REI are sponsors of National Winter Trails Day, and we’ll have the experts and the equipment on hand to help you get started, all you have to do is show up ready to have fun.
  • In 2003, Tubbs Snowshoes founded the Romp to Stomp Out Breast Cancer Series – a snowshow walk and race that benefits Susan G Komen for the Cure and the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation. Modeled after the Race for the Cure, the Romp to Stomp has a 3k or 5k snowshoe walk or a 3k snowshoe race. Tubbs will host 7 Romps in the US this year, in Vermont, New Jersey, Oregon, Utah, Minnesota, Washington, and Colorado, and 2 in Canada. It’s a fantastic cause, with all of the proceeds and fundraising from the event go to benefit Susan G Komen and CBCF, and it’s a really amazing event to show up with hundreds or thousands of people all out to go snowshoeing together. Take a look at www.tubbsromptostomp.com to find out about each event near you.
  • So that’s really it! You’ve seen how snowshoeing is a wonderful way to explore winter and stay active during the snowy months of the year, for all ages and ability levels. You know how to choose the right gear to get out there, and you have some tips to give it a shot, and tools to find trails and events to try it out.  Above all, I hope I’ve provided you with some inspiration to get going in winter. Snowshoeing isn’t just a great form of exercise; it’s a really fun way to experience your surroundings with a new look buried under a beautiful blanket of snow.  End with Q & A, raffle prizes, and mention of hand-outs and coupons.
  • Snowshoes.com Get Going! Presentation - Bend, OR

    1. 1. Presented By:Supported By:
    2. 2. Get Education, Information, and the Tools to Get Out and Explore Winter!Speaker:Graham Gephart
    3. 3. Why Snowshoeing?It’s a fun, low-impact, highly aerobic sport that allows you to getoutside with friends and family to experience the beauty of winter! From here To here
    4. 4. Why Snowshoeing?• A new variable for hikers: snow!• Smoothes out rough, brushy terrain from summer• Quiet, beautiful, serene – fewer people on the trail.• Bonus: No mosquitoes! VS.
    5. 5. Why Snowshoeing?Helps you stay active, stay healthy - whetheryou go for a workout or just for fun.Calories Burned/Hour at Moderate Activity LevelSnowshoeing: 680 Cycling: 408Downhill Skiing: 408 Hiking: 340Walking: 272Great high heart rate, low-impact exercise!
    6. 6. All About SnowshoesChoosing the right product for your winter adventures! • Understanding the different kinds of snowshoes. • Choosing the right product for you.Presented by:
    7. 7. All About SnowshoesToday’s snowshoes have modernmaterials, lighter weight, bettertraction and more efficiency fortravel.Snowshoe design still comesdown to the four keycomponents we call F.A.C.T.
    8. 8. All About Snowshoes aluminum frameF. – FlotationA. The ability to keep the user from sinking in the snow comes from theC. surface area of the deck and frame,T. user weight, and snow conditions. coated nylon decking molded snowshoe deck
    9. 9. All About Snowshoes Atlas Spring-Loaded SuspensionF.A. – Articulation Atlas Free-Rotating SuspensionC. The way the snowshoe binding is attached to the frame and deck, whichT. dictates stability, control and a natural stride. Tubbs Rotating Toe Cord
    10. 10. All About Snowshoes easy to pull strapsF.A.C. – Comfort easy opening bucklesT. Ergonomic shape provides natural solid lateral stride. Supportive structure, easy to use support buckles and secure hold from the binding provides comfort, intuitive use, and proper support for the connection between you and the snowshoe.
    11. 11. All About Snowshoes basic toe cramponF.A. basic heel traction aggressive toe cramponC. aggressive aft tractionT. – Traction The teeth of the snowshoe, for gripping hard or soft snow. Crampons and rails provide grip for uphill, sidehill and downhill slopes to keep you confident.
    12. 12. How to Choose the Right SnowshoeThree Simple Questions1. What is your Gender?2. What is your intended use?3. What is your total weight with gear?
    13. 13. How to Choose the Right Snowshoe1. What is your Gender? This narrows down whether to look at men’s or women’s products, because each is designed for the biomechanical differences in a man’s or woman’s stride. Men’s Features: Women’s Features: men’s binding last women’s binding last wider frame shape narrower frame shape and waist longer lengths shorter lengths
    14. 14. How to Choose the Right Snowshoe2. What is your intended use? Snowshoes are designed with different features for different categories.Trail Walking Mtn Hiking Backcountry Running KidsBasic traction Moderate traction Ultimate traction Lightest possible weight Basic tractionEasy to use bindings Heel lift for climbing Heel lift for climbing Minimal flotation Sized for kidsComfortable stride Comfort-build bindings Packs well for carrying Basic traction Easy to use bindings
    15. 15. How to Choose the Right Snowshoe3. What is your total weight with gear? Snowshoes are a balance between flotation and maneuverability. Snowshoe hangtags and sizing charts can help guide you to the size that best corresponds to your needs and your snow conditions. OR
    16. 16. DRESSING FOR WINTER How to stay comfortable, warm, and dry out in the snow.Presented By:
    17. 17. What to Wear?What is Comfort? • Personal Perception – everyone has a different perception of when they are and aren’t comfortable. • Discomfort = WET and COLD! • Result of accelerated body heat lossWhat you are DOING affectscomfort!
    18. 18. How to Stay Warm and Dry?Being comfortable is a matter of balance. Theamount of heat your body produces has tomatch the heat it loses.Your body transfers heat in 3 ways: • Evaporation – The body’s natural cooling system • Convection – Wind • Conduction – Temperature transfer
    19. 19. The Key to Comfort: Waterproof, breathablesystems and flexibility withlayers. • Manage moisture from within, while protecting from elements of weather. • Clothing options that work as a system together, allowing ventilation or heat retention, and wicking away moisture.
    20. 20. Keys to Staying ComfortableThe VIP EquationVentilation + Insulation + Protection = ComfortHow can clothing help manage heat loss? • Breathable fabrics allow evaporation to manage heat – BASE • Windproof layers keep wind out to manage convection – MIDLAYER • Waterproof shells keep insulating layers dry to manage conduction – OUTERLAYER
    21. 21. Maximum Breathability – Wicking BaselayersStop overheating! Breathability and wicking are the most efficientways for the body to manage the microclimate without expendingtoo much energy.New baselayer designs: • Wick moisture away • Retain warmth • No itch! • Less stink!
    22. 22. Midlayer – Insulation Choose a midlayer option depending on your climate and snowshoeing needs. WINDSTOPPER® materials offer up to 250% more warmth in the wind than a basic fleece – a bonus for hybrid midlayers.Insulation under Outerwear OR Hybrid Warmth/Protection
    23. 23. Keeping the Elements at Bay – Outerwear • Outerwear has to do it all – it’s your main line of defense against the weather. • Your jacket has to be much more weather-resistant than any other layer, but without sacrificing the breathability of the layers underneath. • Consider more than just snowshoeing. What other activities do you want to do?
    24. 24. The GORE-TEX® Menu – Options for Outerwear• Waterproof, breathable outerwear offers versatility for all of winter’s conditions.• Consider your usual weather conditions, and what activities you’ll be doing.• Pro Shell – The Professionals Choice • The most rugged, most breathable fabrics for extreme conditions to meet the demands of serious enthusiasts.• Paclite Shell – When Weight and Size Matter • Extremely breathable with the lightest, most packable fabrics.
    25. 25. Head and Hands – The Body’s RadiatorsGORE-TEX® Comfort Science: • The concentration of sweat glands on the hands and head give them tremendous ability to control body temperature and thus affect the total perception of comfort. • Having an extra layer is a good idea for rigorous snowshoeing – keep a glove shell or extra hat in your pack will help keep you warm after you’ve been sweating. Active sweat glands/cm2 100 120 140 170 190 >200
    26. 26. These Boots Were Made for Walkin’What kind of footwear works best for snowshoeing? OR
    27. 27. These Boots Were Made for Walkin’Snowshoe footwear is designed for performance with activity, usingthe same concepts of waterproofing and breathability. • GORE-TEX® footwear provides optimal climate comfort and keeps feet dry and comfortable. • Extreme breathability • Excellent moisture management • Durable waterproof protection
    28. 28. Which Category Fits You?Like snowshoes, footwear choicesreflect what kind of snowshoeing Standard Hikeryou want to do! All of these areweather-ready with GORE-TEX®,and you can pair them with gaitersfor deep-snow comfort! Light Hiker Trail Runner
    29. 29. Footwear & Apparel Care and Maintenance• Winter wear is an investment. Treat your gear right to prolong its lifetime of use.• Over time, dirt, grease, oil, dog fur, smoke, and other things can clog up the breathable membrane or wear down its Durable Water Repellant (DWR).
    30. 30. Footwear & Apparel Care Dirty waterproof/breathand Maintenance able garment• Can I wash my outerwear? YES!• Washing your outerwear regularly is necessary to maintain good water repellancy. Clean• Restore your DWR treatment on waterproof/bre older apparel and footwear with a athable garment waterproofing treatment.
    31. 31. GETTING OUT THEREResources and information to get started on snow! Presented By:
    32. 32. Fuel for Your AdventuresTips for the snowshoe gourmand: • Snack as you go for continued energy. • Put on a hat or warmer layer when you stop to eat. • Sit on your pack or other pad instead of snow to keep warm.
    33. 33. Fuel for Your AdventuresHydration is just as important as energy.Staying hydrated helps: • Keep extremities warm by higher blood volume pushing out to fingers/toes and thinner blood flowing more easily. • Women have colder extremities in general, so drink up!Tips for hydration: • Use a hydration bladder for easy access. Blowing water back into the bladder will keep it from freezing in the cold.
    34. 34. 10 EssentialsYour hiking essentials work for snowshoeing too!1. Map 6. Sunglasses and sunscreen2. Compass 7. First aid kit3. Headlamp 8. Pocketknife4. Extra food and water 9. Waterproof matches/lighter5. Extra clothing 10. Firestarter11TH Essential? – Duct Tape! Roll some around your snowshoe poles for compact storage.
    35. 35. Safety BasicsFor strolling a local park or exploring in the mountains:1. Dress in layers and use outdoor-appropriate clothing to stay warm and dry.2. Stay hydrated, even if you don’t feel as thirsty in the cold.3. Check the weather forecast, and be prepared for changes – www.nws.noaa.gov4. Check your local avalanche forecast if applicable to your terrain – www.avalanche.org5. Tell someone your destination and plans.6. In winter, plan for fewer daylight hours and leave extra time.7. Familiarize yourself with a map, as snow may hide summer landmarks.8. Try your first snowshoe walk someplace familiar to you, and judge your fitness level honestly. Plan for a little more effort than a similar distance hike.9. Keep an equipment checklist for essentials.
    36. 36. Can I Bring the Kids?• Keep outings, especially the first ones, short• Make sure kids have plenty of layers on and help regulatetemperatures• Have snacks and plenty of liquidsavailable. Healthy snacks aplenty,but a little chocolate never hurt.• Find some fun games to play alongthe trail – Winter I Spy
    37. 37. What About Fido, too?• Before getting your pet in the car, confirmthat pets are allowed where you are going• Be respectful with your animal and keep allpets (including cats and lizards!) on a leash• Make sure you have the proper ability toclean up after your pet• Communicate with others on the trailabout your animal and how best to approach
    38. 38. Trail EtiquetteJust because you can snowshoe whereveryou like.. It’s a good idea: • Not to walk on groomed ski tracks or backcountry skin tracks – machinery or people have worked hard for those tracks so keep them intact! • Just as in hiking, yield to the uphill snowshoer. • Follow Leave No Trace principles – take only pictures, leave only (snowshoe) footprints. • Don’t eat the yellow snow!
    39. 39. Getting Going on SnowshoesAscending a Hill:• Kick in & press down to make a step• Go slower and more deliberately on steep slopes• Use your heel lifts and poles!
    40. 40. Getting Going on SnowshoesDescending a Hill:• Shorter steps• Bend your knees, and keep your weight over your heels• In soft snow, enjoy the glide!• Use poles for additional balance
    41. 41. Getting Going on SnowshoesBreaking Trail: How to blaze a new path• Take turns out front, share the effort.• The 2nd or 3rd person will usually have apretty packed track.• Make consistent, even steps for those behind you.• Remember to pick your feet up higher if you need to back up!
    42. 42. Getting Going on SnowshoesUsing Poles: Add some extra stability.• Reduce stress on your legs, add upper bodymovement.• Adjust your poles for your height.• For steeper ascents, go shorter with your poles. Adjust longer for the descent for balance in front of you.
    43. 43. Getting Out There – Finding Places to GoWhat kind of places can you go snowshoeing? • Your neighborhood parks or trails • Local Nordic centers with snowshoe or multi-use trails • Summer hiking trails • Snowshoe community events
    44. 44. Regional Trails to Explore1. Edison Butte Sno-Park – A 4-mile out and back to the Edison Warming Hut. Easy ability level, great for beginners. (SnoPark Pass required, 5 Sno-Parks in Deschutes NF)2. Bachelor Nordic Center – Easy ability level, varying trail distances and types, mixed-use. Ticket required.3. Steelhead Falls – Follows Deschutes River to the falls. On BLM land, short distance, easy hiking. Free, takes a little navigating from Terrebonne.4. Wanderlust Snowshoe Tours – Private operator, offers guided half-day tours.
    45. 45. Resources to Find TrailsSnowshoes.com TrailNet Database • Over 3,300 user-submitted trails nationwide. • Easy to search or browse for trails in your area. • Registered users can rate a trail, add trip reports and photos.
    46. 46. Other Classes and ResourcesREI’s Outdoor School and REI Adventures offer everything fromguided snowshoe outings to rugged multiday adventures.REI GPS Navigation Basics – 12/6 • Join REI to learn basics of GPS navigation. Learn how to pinpoint your location, mark waypoints and navigate to distant points. If you own a GPS unit, please bring it to class.REI Snowshoe Rentals
    47. 47. Recommended EventsNational Winter Trails Day – January 12, 2013 • A free trial day for snowshoeing nationwide, perfect for families and those new to snowshoeing – www.wintertrails.org • 8 Anchor Sites, 90+ AffiliateUS Snowshoe Nationals, March 16-17, 2013 • Competitive snowshoe running event, with demos and other spectator activities.
    48. 48. Recommended EventsTubbs Romp to Stomp Out Breast Cancer Snowshoe Series • A fun community event with a 3k or 5k snowshoe walk that benefits Susan G. Komen for the Cure and Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation. • Draws thousands of new and old snowshoers alike to snowshoe for the cause. Mountain Creek, NJ: 1/19/13 Stratton, VT: 1/26/13 Stevens Pass, WA: 2/2/13 Mt Hood, OR: 2/9/13 Scenic Caves, ON: 2/9/13 MN Landscape Arboretum, MN: 2/9/13 Park City, UT: 2/23/13 Mt Seymour, BC: 3/2/13 Frisco, CO: 3/2/13
    49. 49. Get Going Snowshoeing!Everything you need to get out there…• Use the resource handouts• Web resources on www.Snowshoes.com• Goody bags have product information and special offers for attendees• Reps and REI employees available to answer product questions• Raffle prizes for snowshoes and clothing Don’t Forget to Sign up for the Grand Prize Drawing!Email sign-up, we’ll send out a workshop survey and email offers from our sponsors. You can opt-out any time, andwe’ll draw one entrant to win snowshoes and poles for one winner and three of their family members or friends!

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