Chapter 1  Introduction to the  Safety Officer Role
Objectives <ul><li>Describe the emergence of the safety officer role in fire departments </li></ul><ul><li>Discuss the his...
Objectives (con’t.) <ul><li>List the National Fire Protection Association Standards (NFPA) standards that affect and perta...
The Safety Officer:  An Introduction   <ul><li>Safety officer: NIMS definition </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Member of command sta...
The Safety Officer:  An Introduction (con't.)   <ul><li>NIMS (National Incident Management System) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>D...
The Safety Officer:  An Introduction (con't.) <ul><li>Safety officer: NFPA definition </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Splits role of...
The Safety Officer:  An Introduction (con't.) <ul><li>NFPA (National Fire Protection Agency) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>For-pro...
Figure 1-1   An effective ISO can reduce the chance of firefighter injury or death.
Figure 1-2  HSO and ISO functions.
History <ul><li>Late 1800s – early 1900s </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Catastrophes led to the appointment of safety officers in f...
Figure 1-3  A late 1880s fire officer – the first safety officer – shouts collapse warnings.
History (con't.) <ul><li>Industrial revolution and World War I </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Need for safety officer increased for...
History (con't.) <ul><li>Factory inspections, posters and briefings </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Result of females in the workpla...
Fire Department Safety  Office Trends <ul><li>FIRESCOPE program (1970s) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Used for multiagency inciden...
Fire Department Safety  Office Trends (con't.) <ul><li>NFPA 1500 adopted (1987) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Roots of risk manage...
Fire Department Safety  Office Trends (con't.) <ul><li>NFPA 1501 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Addresses authority, qualifications...
The Need for an Incident  Safety Officer <ul><li>Role of safety officer based on a simple premise: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>W...
Empirical Study <ul><li>Death and injury statistics </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Do not include 9/11 deaths  </li></ul></ul><ul><...
Figure 1-5  An average of 104 firefighters have died in the line of duty in the past ten years.  (Source:  United States F...
Empirical Study (con't.) <ul><li>Worker’s compensation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Statutory for each state </li></ul></ul><ul><...
Image Study <ul><li>Based on how the general public views firefighters and how they view themselves </li></ul><ul><ul><li>...
The Bottom Line <ul><li>Fire departments must continue to improve firefighter safety </li></ul><ul><li>An incident safety ...
Figure 1-6  The creation of an effective Incident Safety Officer program is the Incident Commander’s key to incident safety.
Summary <ul><li>Safety officer </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Prevents injury and loss of life through risk management and hazard r...
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Chapter 01

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Chapter 01

  1. 1. Chapter 1 Introduction to the Safety Officer Role
  2. 2. Objectives <ul><li>Describe the emergence of the safety officer role in fire departments </li></ul><ul><li>Discuss the history of the fire department safety officer </li></ul>
  3. 3. Objectives (con’t.) <ul><li>List the National Fire Protection Association Standards (NFPA) standards that affect and pertain to the incident safety officer </li></ul><ul><li>Explain the need for an incident safety officer in empirical and image terms </li></ul>
  4. 4. The Safety Officer: An Introduction <ul><li>Safety officer: NIMS definition </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Member of command staff </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Monitors and assesses safety hazards or unsafe situations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Develops measures for ensuring personnel safety </li></ul></ul>
  5. 5. The Safety Officer: An Introduction (con't.) <ul><li>NIMS (National Incident Management System) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Developed through Homeland Presidential Directive 5 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mandates a consistent nationwide approach to prepare, respond, and recover from domestic incidents regardless of cause, size, or complexity </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. The Safety Officer: An Introduction (con't.) <ul><li>Safety officer: NFPA definition </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Splits role of safety officer for greater specificity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>ISO (incident safety officer) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Safety officer command role as defined by NIMS </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>HSO (health and safety officer) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Manager of the fire department’s safety and health program </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Assigned and authorized by the fire chief </li></ul></ul></ul>
  7. 7. The Safety Officer: An Introduction (con't.) <ul><li>NFPA (National Fire Protection Agency) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>For-profit association </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Develops consensus standards, guides, and codes for fire-related topics </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Defined roles of ISO and HSO in NFPA 1521 standard </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>HSO/ISO division proposed by FDSOA </li></ul></ul></ul>
  8. 8. Figure 1-1 An effective ISO can reduce the chance of firefighter injury or death.
  9. 9. Figure 1-2 HSO and ISO functions.
  10. 10. History <ul><li>Late 1800s – early 1900s </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Catastrophes led to the appointment of safety officers in fire service for risk management </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Collapse of Jennings building in 1854 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Railroad car fire in Colorado Springs in 1898 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“Wall watchers”: stood at corners of buildings and watched for signs of building collapse during a working fire </li></ul></ul>
  11. 11. Figure 1-3 A late 1880s fire officer – the first safety officer – shouts collapse warnings.
  12. 12. History (con't.) <ul><li>Industrial revolution and World War I </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Need for safety officer increased for fire departments and general manufacturing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Soldiers became mechanized </li></ul></ul><ul><li>World War II </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Significant injury in support as well as combat roles </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Safety officer role became formalized </li></ul></ul>
  13. 13. History (con't.) <ul><li>Factory inspections, posters and briefings </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Result of females in the workplace, insurance industry, and organized labor </li></ul></ul><ul><li>William Stieger Act of 1970 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Occupational Safety and Health Act </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Equal rights for employers and employees with respect to safe working conditions </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) </li></ul></ul>
  14. 14. Fire Department Safety Office Trends <ul><li>FIRESCOPE program (1970s) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Used for multiagency incidents on the West Coast </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Recommended a safety officer or safety sector </li></ul></ul><ul><li>IFSTA Incident Command System manual (1983) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Safety officer position integral to command </li></ul></ul>
  15. 15. Fire Department Safety Office Trends (con't.) <ul><li>NFPA 1500 adopted (1987) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Roots of risk management </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Slow to catch on </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Led to integration of safety officer role in fire department culture </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Primarily addresses HSO role </li></ul></ul>
  16. 16. Fire Department Safety Office Trends (con't.) <ul><li>NFPA 1501 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Addresses authority, qualifications, and responsibilities of safety officer </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Changed to NFPA 1521 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>NIIMS (National Interagency Incident Management System) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Direct descendant of FIRESCOPE program </li></ul></ul><ul><li>NFPA 1521 leading the way in evolution of safety officer role </li></ul>
  17. 17. The Need for an Incident Safety Officer <ul><li>Role of safety officer based on a simple premise: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>We (in the fire department) have not done a good job of taking care of our own people </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Better equipment and fewer fires have not led to fewer firefighter injuries or deaths </li></ul>
  18. 18. Empirical Study <ul><li>Death and injury statistics </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Do not include 9/11 deaths </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>About 100 firefighters die each year in line of duty </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Rate of injuries per 10,000 fires fought has increased </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Use of an ISO can reduce potential threat to firefighters today </li></ul>
  19. 19. Figure 1-5 An average of 104 firefighters have died in the line of duty in the past ten years. (Source: United States Fire Administration. )
  20. 20. Empirical Study (con't.) <ul><li>Worker’s compensation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Statutory for each state </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Rates set by NCCI and may be adjusted by state for experience </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>NCCI rate * payroll * experience modifier </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Costly for fire department </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Based on number and cost of claims </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Can impact fire department employers and employees for years </li></ul></ul></ul>
  21. 21. Image Study <ul><li>Based on how the general public views firefighters and how they view themselves </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Injuries </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Stress in workplace: labor shifts and slowdowns </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Concern, introspection, and trepidation after accident </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Deaths </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Private investigations, concern about liability, demotions, suspensions, and terminations </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Both damage personal lives of firefighters </li></ul></ul>
  22. 22. The Bottom Line <ul><li>Fire departments must continue to improve firefighter safety </li></ul><ul><li>An incident safety officer can make a difference – right now </li></ul><ul><li>Goals of this book </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Share a systematic and meaningful approach to creating and implementing an ISO program </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Provide information to make sweeping changes in your department </li></ul></ul>
  23. 23. Figure 1-6 The creation of an effective Incident Safety Officer program is the Incident Commander’s key to incident safety.
  24. 24. Summary <ul><li>Safety officer </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Prevents injury and loss of life through risk management and hazard reduction </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Two specialties </li></ul><ul><ul><li>HSO (administrative) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>ISO (command staff) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Strong need for ISOs on working incidents </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Based on rising injury-death statistics and associated costs </li></ul></ul>

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