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Worknet tampa bay it workforce analysis pdf

  1. 1. Tampa Bay Information Technology Workforce Analysis Hillsborough and Pinellas FindingsTampa Bay IT Workforce Analysis Published: Page 0 10/11/2012
  2. 2. Tampa Bay IT Workforce Analysis – Hillsborough and Pinellas CountyTable of ContentsProject Objectives ......................................................................................................................................... 4Economic Outlook ........................................................................................................................................ 4Background Research ................................................................................................................................... 7 INTERVIEWS ...............................................................................................................................................................9 SURVEYS ....................................................................................................................................................................9 FOCUS GROUPS ........................................................................................................................................................ 10Summary of Findings .................................................................................................................................. 11Focus Area 1: Real World Training for High Demand Careers.................................................................. 13 CURRENT SKILLS GAP.............................................................................................................................................. 14 MINIMUM LEVELS OF EDUCATION REQUIRED FOR COMPETENCY ............................................................................ 16 SOFT SKILLS ............................................................................................................................................................ 16 TRAINING ................................................................................................................................................................. 16 ENTRY LEVEL SKILLS .............................................................................................................................................. 17 BUSINESS EDUCATION PARTNERSHIPS ..................................................................................................................... 18Focus Area 2: Streamlining Internship Opportunities for Tomorrow’s Workforce.................................... 19Focus Area 3: Innovative Career Development, Recruitment and Retention Practices.............................. 21 RECRUITMENT: ........................................................................................................................................................ 21 EMPLOYMENT CULTURE .......................................................................................................................................... 21 MOBILE WORKERS ................................................................................................................................................... 21 SALARIES: ................................................................................................................................................................ 21 RECRUITMENT OF MILITARY VETERANS .................................................................................................................. 22Focus Area 4: Regional Marketing and External Recruiting ...................................................................... 23 INNOVATION: ........................................................................................................................................................... 24Focus Area 5: Implementation & Coordination .......................................................................................... 25 COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT CAN BRIDGE THE GAP ................................................................................................ 27 TAMPA BAY IT WORKFORCE ANALYSIS TEAM........................................................................................................ 27 FUNDING: ................................................................................................................................................................. 27Appendix 1: Summary of Recommendations ............................................................................................. 28Appendix 2: Gartner’s 2012 Emerging Technologies Hype Cycle............................................................. 32 Page 1Appendix 3: Information Technology Competency Model ........................................................................ 33
  3. 3. Tampa Bay IT Workforce Analysis – Hillsborough and Pinellas CountyAppendix 4 .................................................................................................................................................. 34Appendix 5 -Focus Group Notes ................................................................................................................ 82 STUDENT FOCUS GROUP .......................................................................................................................................... 82 CEO/CIO IT FOCUS GROUP..................................................................................................................................... 85 IT HR PROFESSIONALS ............................................................................................................................................ 87Bibliography: .............................................................................................................................................. 90List of FiguresFigure 1 - IT Workforce Leadership Team ................................................................................................... 3Figure 2 - Employment Projections .............................................................................................................. 4Figure 3 - National Unemployment Rate for IT occupations ....................................................................... 5Figure 4 - Computer & Information Science Degrees Conferred ................................................................. 6Figure 5 - National studies related to IT workforce needs ............................................................................ 7Figure 6 - Regional and state studies referencing workforce development .................................................. 7Figure 7 - STEM Job Growth ....................................................................................................................... 8Figure 8 – Companies/Institutions Interviewed ............................................................................................ 9Figure 9 - Industries Represented ................................................................................................................. 9Figure 10- Focus Group Participants .......................................................................................................... 11Figure 11 - Minimum Education................................................................................................................. 16Figure 12 - Important skills for new hires arranged by most frequency cited ............................................ 17Figure 13 - Salaries by Occupation ............................................................................................................. 21Figure 14 -Tampa Bay Innovation Resources............................................................................................. 24Figure 15: Grow Tampa Bay Tech Leadership ........................................................................................... 25 Page 2
  4. 4. Tampa Bay IT Workforce Analysis – Hillsborough and Pinellas CountyIntroductionThe region’s leading economic development organizations received anecdotal evidence that localemployers were facing challenges trying to hire employees for Information Technology (IT) occupations.A quick review of national news sources indicated that this was a common problem throughout thecountry. To investigate further, Tampa Bay area organizations joined together to produce the Tampa BayIT Workforce Analysis, to assess the extent of the challenges and to develop solutions to increase the ITtalent pool. In the course of conducting the study’s survey, interviews and focus groups, it became clearthat there is indeed a gap between the demand and the supply of specific IT professions in the localmarket. On the supply side, the area has an abundance of learning opportunities for both new and lifelonglearners. The Hillsborough and Pinellas counties are located in the Tampa Bay region 1, and home tonumerous businesses that house back offices of skilled IT professionals as well high tech IT service firmsneeding to staff positions with skilled IT talent. The challenge became finding a way to link specificemployer needs to specific educational training and recruitment solutions. Figure 1 - IT Workforce Leadership TeamFairfield Index, Inc. found thatnational and international workforceagencies recognized the increasingly“loud call” to compete through tighteralignment of talent and employerdemands while taking an integratedapproach to economic development. 2Over the next 20 years companies willlocate where they have access to top-quality talent. This creates anenvironment that requires evolutionarystrategies in which today’s investmentbuilds an ever-increasing, constantlyadapting future talent supply chain.A taskforce was organized by theTampa Hillsborough Economic Development Corporation with the recognition that while this was anational issue, the solutions must be regional. The taskforce included regional economic developmentorganizations, workforce agencies and industry associations (See Figure 1). The Tampa Bay WorkforceAlliance provided the critical resources to support the project, funding two professional staff positions.Based on research conducted in Hillsborough and Pinellas counties, and represented in this document, theIT Workforce Task Force has released a set of recommendations designed to effectively and efficientlyimpact the existing workforce gap within these two communities. The study also included interviews withand surveys of companies in the six surrounding counties that make up the greater Tampa Bay region; thisresearch is ongoing and findings will be released under a separate report.1 The Tampa Bay region includes the counties of Hillsborough, Pinellas, Polk, Pasco, Hernando, Citrus, Sarasota and Manatee.2 Florida’s Demand-Driven Talent Supply Chain System: National and International Assessment, Farifield Index, Inc. prepared for Workforce Page 3Florida, Inc. February 29, 2012, page 4.
  5. 5. Tampa Bay IT Workforce Analysis – Hillsborough and Pinellas CountyThe recommendations in this report strengthen the relationships between business, education, and thetalent pool.Project ObjectivesThis project was launched to identify and quantify any gap between industry demands and the existingtalent supply; and then, based on interviews and focus groups, create actionable steps to close these gaps.The ultimate goal is to create a pipeline of IT talent for Tampa Bay area companies.The project included extensive conversations with businesses, education, workforce and economicdevelopment leaders. This report is a reflection of a wide range of input, perspectives and proposedsolutions. It is intended to initiate activities that will close the workforce gap by increasing the efficiencyof the IT talent supply chain.Economic OutlookAccording to an economic impact analysis conducted by the Florida Department of EconomicOpportunity using IMPLAN economic modeling software, each new IT job also creates 1.58 indirect jobsin the Hillsborough and Pinellas counties. The two-county area is estimated to receive nearly $16 billionin GDP from IT. 3 In addition, IT job growth is expected to outpace total occupation job growth for theperiod from 2011 through 2019, adding over 4,000 new jobs during that period (See Figure 2). Due toquality concerns and the increased importance of collaboration, jobs that had previously been movedoffshore are now returning to the United States.Hillsborough and Pinellas counties have a slightly higher concentration of IT workers than the nationalconcentration, and Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) has the highestconcentration of IT workers of Florida’s major metropolitan areas (See Location Quotient in Appendix 4,page 81). Figure 2 - Employment Projections Hillsborough-Pinellas Counties Employment Percent SOC Code Occupation Title 2011 2019 Change 11.3021 Computer and Information Systems Managers 1,519 1,717 13.0% 15.1021 Computer Programmers 3,761 3,646 -3.1% 15.1031 Computer Software Engineers, Applications 3,932 4,783 21.6% 15.1032 Computer Software Engineers, Systems Software 1,946 2,343 20.4% 15.1041 Computer Support Specialists 4,370 4,868 11.4% 15.1051 Computer Systems Analysts 5,098 5,857 14.9% 15.1061 Database Administrators 1,103 1,306 18.4% 15.1071 Network and Computer Systems Administrators 2,180 2,526 15.9% 15.1081 Network Systems and Data Communications Analysts 3,091 4,214 36.3% 15.1099 Computer Specialists, All Other 792 937 18.3% Total IT Occupations 27,792 32,197 15.8% Total All Occupations 1,081,661 1,228,720 13.6%Source: Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, Employment Projections 2011-2019There have been recent changes in the way that IT talent chooses to locate, which add to the complexityof understanding IT workforce patterns. Page 43 MIG, Inc., IMPLAN System. (2012, July 2011). IT Economic Impact Hillsborough and Pinellas Counties. Hudson, WI.
  6. 6. Tampa Bay IT Workforce Analysis – Hillsborough and Pinellas County • It is the nature of the IT industry to have occasional layoffs between projects. Because of this, skilled IT workers choose to live where there is a concentration of IT workers and companies, because it is easier for them to find a new job if they are laid off. • Because IT is rapidly changing and there is a shortage of talent nationally, many IT workers have elected to become free agents and work as independent contractors, moving as feasible to increasingly higher paid positions or contracts. • Many IT employers are allowing top talent to work from home, potentially increasing the ease of job mobility of these top employees who are no longer tied to a physical location. This development could ease the path for recruitment of these employees and drive higher salaries. • The lower costs of airline fares combined with increasing IT wages are resulting in some IT workers commuting from a home city to another city during the week to earn greater wages.From an occupational perspective, IT unemployment rates are among the lowest in the country, leading toan increase in salaries and a greater prerogative on the part of prospective workers to determine whereand for whom they will work (See Figure 3). Figure 3 - National Unemployment Rate for IT occupations Occupations Employed Unemployed Unemployment Rate Computer and mathematical 3,760,000 140,000 3.6 occupations Computer systems analysts 505,000 15,000 2.9 Computer programmers 469,000 18,000 3.7 Software developers, applications 1,036,000 26,000 2.5 and systems software Web developers 178,000 6,000 3.0 Computer support specialists 487,000 43,000 8.2 Database administrators 89,000 5,000 5.7 Network and computer systems 229,000 11,000 4.7 administrators Computer network architects 152,000 1,000 0.8 Computer occupations, all other 338,000 13,000 3.6 Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, Current Population Survey, Q2 2012The unemployment rates for specific occupations are only calculated on a national level. The numberspresented in Figure 3 are from the second quarter of 2012. For the purpose of perspective, the totalunemployment rate for all job categories in the Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater MSA was 9.0% as ofJune 2012, according to Bureau of Labor Statistics. Page 5
  7. 7. Tampa Bay IT Workforce Analysis – Hillsborough and Pinellas CountyThere are resources in Hillsborough and Pinellas counties to train workers. Hillsborough CommunityCollege had the largest technology enrollment in the area in fall of 2011 with 1,677 students, according tothe Tampa Bay Business Journal’s 2012 Book of Lists. St. Petersburg College had the second highesttechnology enrollment with 1,262 students enrolled. (See Appendix 4, Page 78 for complete details) Bothof these colleges, as well as Saint Leo University, also train significant numbers of returning militarypersonnel to enter the IT workforce.The University of South Florida and the University of Tampa also confer bachelor’s and master’stechnology degrees. Their students are eagerly recruited by local IT employers.There were 398 Computer and Information Science degrees conferred in 2009 in the Tampa Bay Region.Many of these students were recruited by local companies, some of which have relationships with localeducational institutions and are active in providing business case studies to the students. Theserelationships were limited to mostly larger companies; our research showed that small to midsizecompanies lack the resources to establish and maintain these relationships. It is important to note thatsome companies have found the Computer and Information Science degree workforce to be extremelymobile within the state. Accordingly, they have developed relationships with universities in other areas ofthe state to increase their recruitment pools. Figure 4 - Computer & Information Science Degrees Conferred Tampa Bay Region State of Florida Total Degrees 398 3,515 Associate’s Degrees 118 1,036 Bachelor’s Degrees 280 2,005 Master’s Degrees N/A 424 Sources: Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics, 2009 and State of Florida Board of Governors *Tampa Bay Region is defined as the counties of Hillsborough, Pinellas, Polk, Pasco, Hernando, Citrus, Sarasota and ManateeAlong with technical programs, Hillsborough and Pinellas counties’ training providers offer a variety oftechnical certifications. For a complete list of certifications offered, see Appendix 4, Page 80. Trainingprograms were used primarily by employers to help keep their employees’ skill sets up to date. However,it should be noted that when making a hiring decision, experience was valued over certifications. Page 6
  8. 8. Tampa Bay IT Workforce Analysis – Hillsborough and Pinellas CountyBackground ResearchAcross the United States, communities have faced similar IT talent supply situations, and comparablestudies were conducted to evaluate the workforce gap and create a local strategy.Throughout the development of our Figure 5 - National studies related to IT workforce needsanalysis, Columbus, Ohio’s “The • 2004Skills Gap in Central Ohio IT Charleston, SC • Reaching the Next Level: A Regional Economic Development Strategic Plan for the Charleston RegionTalent” was used as a guide.Contributors 4 to Central Ohio’s Iowa • 2005 • Iowa’s Information Technology Strategic Road Mapanalysis also provided valuableinsights and feedback to Tampa • 2007Bay’s IT Workforce Analysis. Northeast Ohio • Northeast Ohio Information Technology Workforce ReportRegionally, economic development • 2011 Arizona • Arizona’s Technology Workforce: Issues, Opportunities andorganizations and workforce boards Competitive Pressureshad begun to explore IT hiring • 2011challenges. Each effort created a Columbus, Ohio • The Skills Gap in Central Ohio IT Talent: Assessment, Opportunity and Recommendationsseries of recommendations that areconsistent with the recommendations in this report.The recommendations of the regional plans included policy changes, as well as short and long termactivities to develop the talent pool Figure 6 - Regional and state studies referencing workforce development(See Figures 5 and 6). • Taking the Next Steps: Business and Educational Summit WorkNet Pinellas Strategic Score CardWorkNet Pinellas has beenmonitoring the issue since 2007 STEMflorida • Five-Year Strategic Plan: STEM Leadership for Floridathrough the publication of theBusiness and Educational Summit Workforce Florida Inc. • 2012 Vision & Strategies, Florida Workforce SystemStrategic Report Card. 5 • Closing the Talent Gap: A Business Perspective, What Florida Florida Council of 100 Needs from the Talent Supply ChainThe Tampa Bay Partnership has • Regional Business Plan for Economic Development in thepublished a Regional Business Plan Tampa Bay Partnership Tampa Bay Region 6for Economic Development to • Roadmap to Florida’s Future: 2010-2015 Strategic Plan for Enterprise Florida Inc. Economic Developmentbuild understanding of regionaleconomic strengths and Partnership for 21st Century • Framework for 21st Century Learningopportunities and to craft a plan that Skillswill lead to job creation and a greater economic resiliency through diversification. The plan specificallyspeaks to larger workforce issues with specific initiatives: • Initiative #14: Expand partnerships and improve communication between industry and the workforce development system • Initiative #15: Increase coordination, collaboration, and information sharing among the regions’ post- secondary institutions4 Maureen Metcalf, Maureen Metcalf and Associates, Tim Hayes, TechColumbus, and Bill Lafayette, Regionomics.5 Report Card, WorkNet Pinellas, Business and Education Summit, September 2011 Page 76 A Regional Business Plan for Economic Development in the Tampa Bay Region, Executive Summary, May 2011
  9. 9. Tampa Bay IT Workforce Analysis – Hillsborough and Pinellas CountyEnterprise Florida has published reports 7 that present statewide initiatives to create innovation drivengrowth, furthering of STEM education, and efforts that “converge around the shared vision of establishingFlorida as a leader in the global innovation economy.”STEM Florida policies focus on increasing the STEM 8 courses in K-12. If successfully implemented,STEM efforts will sustain the near term recommendations outlined in this report. STEM jobs areprojected to increase, requiring technical skills and a demand for continuous learning. Figure 7 - STEM Job Growth Florida Annual Job Growth Rates 2011-2019 STEM 2.16% Total, STEM and Non-STEM 1.62% Non-STEM 1.56% Source: Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, Labor Market Statistics Center, Forecast to 2019, released October 2011Elementary and secondary students are introduced to and offered opportunities to engage in STEMcareers through curriculum focused on defined career pathways through Career and Technical EducationCenters and Centers of Excellence in the Tampa Bay area. The benefits realized by students directly relateto the expectations of business leaders that participated in the IT Workforce Analysis.Career and Technical Education (CTE) can benefit students directly by providing earning advantagesbefore and after graduation. It can benefit them indirectly by increasing engagement, retention, andpersistence and by directing them to postsecondary education and pursuit of lifelong learning. CTEprograms motivate students to get involved in their learning by engaging them in problem-solvingactivities that construct knowledge; by providing hands-on activities that enable them to apply CTEknowledge; bringing students and adults together in a setting of collaborative learning; and offeringopportunities for students to interact with community members, potential employers, teachers and otherstudents who share similar career/vocational interests. 97 Roadmap to Florida’s Future, 2012-2015 Strategic Plan for Economic Development, Roadmap to Florida’s Future, Page 4. See Bibliography.8 STEM - Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) http://www.stemflorida.net/ Page 89 The Benefits of Career and Technical Education. Trends and Issues Alert. Author: Brown, Bettina
  10. 10. Tampa Bay IT Workforce Analysis – Hillsborough and Pinellas CountyThe analysis was completed by professional staff under the direction of the IT Workforce AnalysisTaskforce. The the study was modeled after the Columbus Ohio study, changing the stratification by sizeof companies surveyed to include small, medium and large companies. The number of focus groups wasexpanded.InterviewsThe analysis began with over 60 interviews with employers and educators to understand which IT skillsand job functions are important to Tampa Bay employers and map relationships with educationalprograms. The companies selected were based on size and type of business. The interviews wereconfidential seeking input on the questions to ask on the survey, clarify trends, discover new issues andcaoncerns, and to socialize solutions. The relationship between education and business demonstrated adeep respect for each other, but a need to clarify opportunities to change the current trend. Some of thegroups interviewed are listed below: Figure 8 – Companies/Institutions InterviewedSurveysThe surveys were developed based on the interviews with businesses. The job functions and skills thatcompanies and institutions reported as being difficult to fill were included in the survey. The questionsand job functions included were vetted 10 for ordering and wording by several business persons, educators,and researchers. Individual questions were Figure 9 - Industries Representedstrategically examined for thoroughnessand content, such as how far into the future Industry Representation Response Percentthe survey should ask for job function Technical Services (Computer Systems Designgrowth. Many of the survey methods used Services, Custom Computer Programming Services, 57% Other Computer Related Services)by the Bureau of Labor Statistics were Health Care 13%incorporated into the questions. Finance and Insurance 10%The survey was distributed through Educational Services 7%targeted emails sent directly to over 140 Public Administration (Government) 6%employers of IT workers in Hillsborough Transportation and Warehousing 4%and Pinellas counties. Survey partners Manufacturing 3%10 Guy Hagen, Tucker Hall, Bill Dobson, Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, Michael Pearce, University of South Florida, Kristin Page 9Dailey, Ph.D, WorkNet Pinellas, Courtney Manning, Fairfield Index, Bill Lafayette, Regionomics.
  11. 11. Tampa Bay IT Workforce Analysis – Hillsborough and Pinellas Countystaff also emailed surveys to IT clients and reached a wider audience through bulk email newsletters.There was a website dedicated to the survey that explained the analysis and provided a link to the survey(http://www.tampabayitworkforcesurvey.org).The goal was to survey 50 companies representing 20% of the IT workforce. However, surveys werecompleted by 64 area companies representing 26% (or 7,261 employees) of the IT workforce inHillsborough and Pinellas counties. The surveydevelopment process sought to include a variety of RESPONSES BY COMPANY SIZE*industries with IT services or back office operations, as Small (1- 100) = 29 (45%) Medium (101 -500) = 16 (25%)well as a stratified response set based on company size Large (over 500) = 19 (30%)and county. Total = 64 *Total number of employeesThe distribution of IT workers in our job skills questionwas an equivalent to the BLS’s IT distribution betweenHillsborough and Pinellas counties. Hillsborough County represented 63% and Pinellas Countyrepresented 37% of the IT worker distribution in our job skills sample and according to the BLS’s total ITworker count. Several large companies responded to the survey but due to company policy were unable torespond to the number of IT workers by county. Using other published sources, we estimated thesecompanies had an additional 2,000 jobs, or a total workforce represented in the survey of 7,261 or 26.1%. Figure 9 A Skills All BLS IT Skill Question All Questions BLS IT Workforce County Question Respondents Questions Respondents Workforce by Respondents by Respondents by Percentages Percentages Percentages Hillsborough 17,448 62.8% 2,302 62.3% 5,306 73.1% Pinellas 10,344 37.2% 1,395 37.7% 1,955 26.9% Total 27,792 100% 3,697 100% 7,261 100%Focus GroupsFocus groups were held to confirm and clarify the survey responses – Students, HR/Hiring Managers,CEO/CIO, and Education. Solutions were refined based on input from the participants. The sessions wereclosed, and all individual comments were held in confidence and are reported without direct attribution. Many of the focus group participants completed the survey. Some of the focus group participants werepart of the 60 interviews conducted. The comments and ideas expressed have been incorporated into therecommendations. Page 10
  12. 12. Tampa Bay IT Workforce Analysis – Hillsborough and Pinellas County Figure 10- Focus Group Participants Students HR/Hiring Managers CEO/CIO Education •University of South •SAIC •Absolute Mobile •University of South Florida •Edge Datagistics Solutions Florida •University of •SharePoint •Panther •University of Tampa Resources International, LLC Tampa •Hillsborough •New Horizons •Tribridge •Hillsborough Community College •Rita Technologies •Transitions Optical Community College •Chase •Haneke Design •St. Petersburg PaymentTech •CSDRS, LLC College •DTCC •WellCare •Community •University of South Solutions of Florida AmericaSummary of FindingsThe following section is a summary of the findings resulting from the interviews, surveys, and focusgroups that took place between June and August 2012. The data analysis and the accompanyingrecommendations are organized by five focus areas: 1. Real-world training for high demand jobs 2. Streamlining internships for tomorrow’s workforce 3. Innovative career development, recruitment, and retention practices 4. Regional marketing and external recruiting 5. Implementation and coordinationOur analysis found overall that the IT labor demand will continue to expand, and that there are specifichigh demand skills unmet in this region. We also know that the landscape will continue to change as newtechnologies are introduced and new markets open to area businesses. Summary of the study findings: • Immediate and profound gaps exist for specific skills: agile development concepts, Java programmers, .NET programmers, cloud computing engineers, sales engineers, ERP 11 , security, and SharePoint. • Employers cited the need for liberal arts education that is associated with a four year degree and that credential trumped the type of degree for some jobs, particularly for programmers. Dual majors/ minors that are marketable to employers allow students, “…to pursue a passion yet get a job upon graduation.” Students graduating with technical skills and experience are the most desired by employers.11 Enterprise resource planning- the management of all the information and resources involved in a company’s operations by means of an integratedcomputer system http://oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/ERP?q=erp Page 11
  13. 13. Tampa Bay IT Workforce Analysis – Hillsborough and Pinellas County• Large companies were satisfied with the graduate population and had positive relationships with area colleges for both interns and fulltime employees, but feel strongly that the study recommendations are needed to secure the future talent supply for both replacement of existing workers.• Future growth areas reported as priorities include business analytics, Big Data, desktop support, computer and software engineers, and security.• Many companies reported having difficulty finding IT professionals with 3- 5 years of experience working in an enterprise environment with the ability to be productive from the first day.• Businesses are requiring employees to do more, have multiple skills, and engage in lifelong learning.• Small to mid-size companies that did not have formal new hire training programs reported challenges finding entry level candidates with the necessary technical knowledge.• Businesses are interested in recruiting military veterans for careers in technology.• Students need to have more real world technical skills when entering the job market.• Students have limited knowledge of the local technology job market.• Participating businesses, educational institutions and students are all willing and interested in working together.• Companies were interviewed and surveys in the six surrounding counties that make up the greater Tampa Bay region; this research is ongoing and findings will be released under separate report. Page 12
  14. 14. Tampa Bay IT Workforce Analysis – Hillsborough and Pinellas CountyFocus Area 1: Real World Training for High Demand CareersEmployers reported a need to fill positions requiring specific technical skills. Students reported the desireto practice the technical skills they learn and to have access to the most current and beta versions of newtechnologies. Small and mid-size employers reported the need for graduates to have more technicalskills.Technology is changing rapidly, and employers are seeking workers with multiple skill sets. There havebeen changes in required skills and position profiles as a result of the increased efficiency in operations,specifically: • Virtualization – downsizing of infrastructure • Cloud Services – outsourcing of services • Collaborative software – management moves to SME from IT Figure 10a • Mobile – work anywhere; information everywhereThese changes created a new paradigm focusingon rapidly changing skills that are not yet Position: Senior SharePoint Developer/Architectinstitutionalized in the training and education Seeking skilled Microsoft SharePoint Architects proficient infields. Job functions are becoming more SharePoint infrastructure planning, Configuration and Development and Customization. Successful candidates muststreamlined, creating one job where two had be skilled in architecting SharePoint applications usingpreviously existed. See the recent position customization and configuration techniques Experience in developing business solutions based on ADO.NET anddescription posted on Dice (Figure 10a). ASP.NET. Practical use of the Unified Modeling Language (UML), Design Patterns, and other architectural principalsThe following comment from an area businessowner provides an actual example of the issues.“Startup and emerging companies need folks that can roll up all of these skills into smaller teams. As thecost to buy or subscribe to applications become lower and lower you cannot afford to hire a JavaDeveloper, a Database administrator, a database developer, a system administrator, a web developer, auser interface developer, a Windows developer, a PHP developer, an HTML developer, a systemarchitect, and a client server developer. Organizations will continue to move toward more nimble andcost effective solutions as technologies evolve. They are shifting away from keeping multiple in house ITfolks that can only program in one language and they will stop buying $1M solutions that can becomeoutdated quickly and require costly maintenance or forced upgrades.” Jana Wiggins, Owner, DocuVantage www.docuvantage.comThe Gartner Hype cycle is an industry standard for identifying the next generation technology and is aguidepost for determining what to include in future curriculum and training programs Education andbusiness should be tracking the trends and begin to plan for training students and professionals. TheGartner Hype Cycle, appearing in Appendix 2, provides a graphical view of the maturity, adoption andbusiness application of specific technologies that are heading to market. 12 Page 1312 Gartner Hype Cycle Methodology, http://www.gartner.com/technology/research/methodologies/hype-cycle.jsp
  15. 15. Tampa Bay IT Workforce Analysis – Hillsborough and Pinellas CountyThe Competency Model provides a framework for creating the bridge to defining the skills, orcompetencies, that are identified as most commonly contributing to success in workplace. 13 Acompetitive business will adapt to changing technologies. Workers must demonstrate that they can adoptnew skills and become lifelong learners. Students must have a plan or pathway to learn and master thenecessary skills to be competitive and valued by the employer. As stated in a recent report: TechnicalAssistance Guide for Developing and Using Competency Models,“Competency models are a resource for both the business and jobseeker customer. They provide aframework for business and industry to clearly articulate their workforce needs. In addition, theydemonstrate the commonality of the broad knowledge and skills needed in an industry that form thefoundation for the development of career ladders or lattices. Competency models also constitute the basison which curriculum developers and training providers ensure that workers have the right skills. Theyarticulate the essential competencies required for occupational licenses and certifications, the credentialsthat ensure that a worker has the necessary skills to be successful at work.” 14The competency models can be used to: 1. Communicate industry needs 2. Direct career exploration and guidance 3. Develop career paths and ladders 4. Plan workforce programs 5. Evaluate, plan and develop curriculum 6. Provide human resource services to businesses 7. Develop assessments, certifications, and licenses 8. Develop industry models and registered apprenticeshipsThe model addresses foundational competencies, as well as industry and occupational competencies.There are 20 different industry models including three that are relevant to the implementation of the ITWorkforce Gap solutions: Information Technology, Advanced Manufacturing and Entrepreneurship (SeeAppendix 3).Current Skills GapThe survey provided a list of 53 technical skills and asked respondents to identify the number of positionsthat were filled or vacant, and positions that they planned to fill over the next 24 months. The survey alsoasked for the length of time it was taking to fill vacant positions requiring the identified skills and thenumber of positions that remained unfilled from between 60 – 90 days. See Appendix 4, page 38 for thedetailed list of positions 15.Agile development was the skill in highest demand, and employers anticipate it to be the highest growthskill over the next 24 months. It is a skill and way of development, rather than a specific job function.13 Source: Technical Assistance Guide for Developing and Using Competency Models – One Solution for the Workforce Development System,January 2012, developed by Personnel Decisions Research Institutes, Inc. (PDRI) in 2005 and has been updated by JBS International, Inc.,Aguirre Division in 2012.14 Ibid., page 315 The numbers are extrapolated to represent the entire population. 3,697 IT workers were accounted for in our sample size. The number ofvacancies and expected growth were then multiplied by 7.517 to adjust the sample to fit the entire population of IT workers, which is 27,792. See Page 14Appendix 4, Page 2 for further explanation
  16. 16. Tampa Bay IT Workforce Analysis – Hillsborough and Pinellas CountyCompanies are moving away from the SDLC 16 or waterfall method of development and towards the agilemethod, because of its speed and flexibility. The agile development skill is not valuable by itself. It mustbe combined with other job functions, such as .NET programming or mobile application development.Prospective employees are of great value to employers if they understand this method and are able toapply it to a specific job function.Java programmers, mobile application developers, and application architects were the job functionsin highest demand. All of these job functions appear on national lists as areas where companies facehiring challenges, but local companies seem to have a specific, immediate need for these job functions. Itis important to note that some of these job functions can be outsourced, but as collaboration andcommunication becomes increasingly important, local employers would prefer to have employees locatedin the Tampa Bay region. Employers are also able to better monitor their employees’ work by havingthem onsite..NET programmers and business analysts were the next job functions in high demand. .NETprogrammers seem to also be in demand nationally, similar to Java programmers. Business analysts are ofemerging importance, as many management decisions are becoming more math-and analytic-based.Companies chose business analyst to be the third most in demand job function over the next 24 months,followed by .NET programmer. Figure 11: High Demand Skills Skill sets and 24-Month Skill or Job Function Desktop support personnel and IT Vacant Positions Growth project managers had high expected Agile Development 385 789 growth potential over the next 24 Java Programmer 235 319 months; however, employers reportedMobile Applications Development 235 338 that they had minimal difficulty hiring Application Architecture 195 346 for these positions. Desktop support .NET Programmer 195 410 personnel seem to be trained quickly Business Analytics/Data Mining 169 449 and inexpensively. It was reported in ERP Implementation 124 372 some of the interviews that there are IT Project Manager 124 346 many Project Management Data Warehousing 124 201 Professionals (PMP) in Tampa Bay, Total High Demand Skills 1,787 3,571 possibly a reason that employers Total All Skills 3,684 8,192 reported minimal difficulty in hiring IT project managers. Companies alsoreported minimal difficulty hiring Windows administrators and software quality assurance personnel.Security professional and SharePoint Administrator and Developer positions were reported asdifficult to fill during the focus groups and interviews. Cyber security is a rapidly expanding field asbusinesses move to the cloud, increasing the risk of data being compromised or lost due to naturaldisasters, terrorist attacks or human error. The SharePoint collaboration platform allows people to worktogether from any location and provides the essential reporting and analysis capabilities.Through surveys, focus groups and interviews, businesses reported having the greatest challenges fillingpositions requiring 3 – 5 years experience, especially Developer, Architect, and Network Engineer Page 1516 SDLC – Software Development Liife Cycle or System Development Life Cycle
  17. 17. Tampa Bay IT Workforce Analysis – Hillsborough and Pinellas Countypositions. These positions require a greater level of training, maturity, industry knowledge, andexperience in an enterprise setting, accompanied with soft skills to be productive from day one. Thesejobs are being filled by recruiting talent from outside the area or hiring contractors, otherwise thepositions are left vacant.Minimum Levels of Education Required for CompetencyWhen considering responses for all job functions, the minimum level of education was overwhelminglyfound to be a bachelor’s degree. Employers are expanding their criteria to include nontraditional ITdegrees such as music and psychology. Music majors bring the ability to perceive patterns and structuresand to consider historical perspectives which are compatible with programming skills. Psychologygraduates are also highly numerate. They are trained to interpret data summaries and to understandprobability statements, and they become familiar with a wide range of statistical procedures andprocesses. Psychology graduates are highly literate and familiarized with the techniques of concisewriting within a pre-set format as they write practical Figure 11 - Minimum Educationresearch reports - a natural fitfor business analytics. Masters degree Less than a highWhile some businesses 3% school diploma 1%stated they would hire aperson that demonstrated Bachelors High school of arts diplomatalent without a degree, the 15% 15%bachelor’s degree was Associatesimportant for advancement degreewithin a company according 15%to a majority of businesses Bachelors ofparticipating in the study. science 51%Soft SkillsEach company assessescandidates for a differentmix of skills and experiencebased on its corporate culture. It is no longer enough to be a technical expert, delivering work in anisolated setting. The most important soft skills reported by survey respondents include problem solving,analysis skills, critical thinking, decision making and collaboration.TrainingDue to the pace of technological advancement, the need for training is a constant. Many companies willprovide internal training; however, IT professionals are expected to take advantage of the variety ofexternal options to develop a self-directed pathway tosharpen technical skills. 96% of businesses provide continued trainingEmployers reported a willingness to consider a 83% reported using external sourcesperson seeking employment who has demonstrated 76% provide training to new hiresthat they have upgraded their skills continuously.Several companies suggested that they would be less Page 16
  18. 18. Tampa Bay IT Workforce Analysis – Hillsborough and Pinellas Countylikely to consider a job seeker who just learned a new technology after many years of working with alegacy technology, and does not have a history of continuous learning.There is a known bias by some human resource professionals and hiring managers against hiring theunemployed. The longer the person is unemployed, the lower the employability score a candidatereceived, according to a research study by Geoffrey C. Ho, Margaret Shih and Daniel J. Walters, from theUniversity of California. 17 They found the length of time out of work was a main factor impacting hiringdecisions.According to our interviews, corporations have trimmed their training budgets. They have movedtechnical training in-house -- changing priorities to internal coaching and mentoring, informal learningand collaborative activities. They only outsource those training tasks requiring a significant traininginvestment. While over 83% of our survey respondents reported that their staff obtained training fromexternal training sources, studies indicate an increase in self funded training. The small to midsizecompanies have seen the greatest impact in the decline of training budgets.Entry Level SkillsBusinesses reported that entry level talent was not proficient in applying technical skills and requiredadditional training before they could begin to be productive. Large and some midsize companies haveformal training programs; small Figure 12 - Important skills for new hires arranged by most frequency citedcompanies are seeking new hireswith higher level technical 90.0%skills. 80.0% 70.0%Students requested 60.0%experiential learning 50.0%opportunities to gain insight 40.0% 30.0%into technologies taught in the 20.0%classroom and to explore 10.0%newer technologies that are 0.0%not in the classroom.Community challenges, suchas the Mayor’s Hack-A-Thonsponsored by the City ofTampa, 18 can provide opportunities to practice skills by moving learning into areas in which many collegestudents are comfortable. Students stated that they learned through challenges and hoped to be able tonetwork with businesses.Students reported that they did not want to learn legacy technology because it leads to maintenance jobs,and they prefer seeking new horizons and being challenged with new technologies.17 Geoffrey C. Ho, Margaret Shih and Daniel J. Walters, “The Psychological Stigma of Unemployment,” 201218 Mayor’s Hack-a-thon, 2012, to create apps that make Tampa better in one 48-hour marathon Page 17session.http://www.tampagov.net/information_resources/HACKATHON/ideas.asp
  19. 19. Tampa Bay IT Workforce Analysis – Hillsborough and Pinellas CountyBusiness Education PartnershipsThrough out the interviews and focus group discussions it was clear the both education leaders andbusiness leaders are willing to work together to increase the competencies of the workforce – bothmatriculating and skilled workers. Businesses have offered to work with educations to provide: • Business use cases for use in the classroom, for capstone projects, and for challenges • Increased structured internships opportunities • Mentor students with capstone project • Engage with student groups such as the TBTF student chapters, and other student associations • Curriculum design that will incorporate the skills, or competencies, that are identified as most commonly contributing to success in workplace Page 18
  20. 20. Tampa Bay IT Workforce Analysis – Hillsborough and Pinellas CountyFocus Area 2: Streamlining Internship Opportunities for Tomorrow’sWorkforceNew hires need to have more real world experiences with technologies, knowledge of enterprise systems,possess the right mix of academic and workplace competencies, and be proficient in multiple areas.Students are requesting more internship opportunities to build a portfolio for graduation. Small to midsizebusinesses are willing to offer internships but do not have the structure to recruit, develop and manageinternship programs.Changing technology and turbulent economic Student Focus Group... “I want an opportunity to practice on the real thing.”conditions require businesses to balance therecruitment of a new hire with the demands of the “I don’t have to be paid or get credit; I just want to win andjob and the ability to stay competitive. Students be seen by the companies. They can hire me.”must acquire more technical skills than thoselearned in the classroom. They must be able to demonstrate real world application of skills to futureemployers. Activities to gain the skill set include: • An internship to increase a student’s technical knowledge, while also reinforcing soft skills, project management and critical thinking skills 19. • A capstone project based on real world business cases demonstrates project management skills necessary in the fast paced world. Business involvement can introduce students to future employers. • Memberships in professional organizations provide networking opportunities that will develop students’ soft skills and connect them to businesses for internships and future job opportunities.Businesses were overwhelmingly interested in having an intern; however, 69% of the businessesresponding did not have a recruiting relationship withany college. Companies must approach each college inthe area and post an internship opportunity using 65% of businesses offer internshipsdifferent interfaces. The process for posting an 91% of interns are paidopportunity could be different at each school or evendepartments within the school. Most companiesreported not having the staff to manage internships, which created a barrier. The option of developing aninternship program was positively received in the CIO/CEO focus group. The HR/Hiring Manager focusgroup suggested a need for training regarding best practices and sample guidelines for establishing asuccessful internship program.Students can acquire both technical and soft skills through classroom instruction; however, they must alsobe able to practice classroom learned skills in real world situations. Engaging in capstone projects,internships, and memberships in professional organizations will prepare a student for the world of work.The technical and soft skills that students bring to the internship experience vary, resulting inmanagement challenges for the businesses. Throughout the course of this study, businesses werecomplimentary of the quality of education in the Tampa Bay area.19 Page 19 (Grant, Malloy, Murphy, Foremen, & Robinson, 2010)
  21. 21. Tampa Bay IT Workforce Analysis – Hillsborough and Pinellas CountySeveral area colleges are offering online credit and non-credit technical training, providing students withthe opportunity to articulate between online (non-credit) and classroom based (credit) courses to increasestudent’s technical skills. Recommendations in this study include marketing to students the value of thistraining pathway for improving job readiness.Businesses have offered to work closely with K-12 and post secondary educators, to provide simulatedbusiness cases to allow students to gain experience and boot camp style technical training offered throughcolleges and other training companies. The marketing of technical careers to students is achieved throughan important partnership between business and education. By offering career fairs and other experientiallearning opportunities to interest students, more individuals may be enticed to enter this field.Engagement with professional business organizations offers students opportunities to network andpractice soft skills, specifically professional communication. The Tampa Bay Technology Forum (TBTF)has offered students memberships and recently expanded student participation by establishing TBTFchapters on college campuses to encourage connections between students, businesses and faculty.Students reported being interested in participating and several chapters have already been initiated onthree campuses in the Tampa Bay area, with expansion plans in the near future. Page 20
  22. 22. Tampa Bay IT Workforce Analysis – Hillsborough and Pinellas CountyFocus Area 3: Innovative Career Development, Recruitment and RetentionPracticesTo be competitive in the global market, business productivity requires the continuous acquisition of newskills that expand industry-wide technical competencies. New skills can be obtained through a variety oftraining methods.Recruitment: Survey respondents reported that online career websites and LinkedIn are the top twoways they recruit IT employees. Small companies used LinkedIn more than any other recruitment tool, asopposed to medium and large companies that favor online career websites. While a few companiesreported using scanning software, applicants are savvy and insert search terms in the margins of theirresumes to increase the likelihood of having their qualifications considered.Employment Culture: Hiring managers and CEOs stated that cultural fit, a relatively new criterion inhuman resources, is very important when recruiting new team members. A person’s style, approach andbehavior on the job must be consistent with the values and expectations of the organization. A candidatemight have the right experience, solid qualifications, a relevant work history, and have performedimpressively during the interview process, but the applicant also needs to fit in with the culture.Collaboration requires the right mix of staff to maintain the desired level of productivity.Mobile Workers: Over 70% of employers allow staff members to work offsite. However the HR/HiringManager Focus group identified that many companies are building a collaborative work environment thatrequires employees to be onsite. In interviews with area recruiters, and as confirmed by HRprofessionals, there are approximately 2,500 IT professionals that leave the area during the week forhigher paying positions in other regions. Similarly, many IT professionals in the Tampa Bay area workremotely for companies located in the Northeast. Figure 13 - Salaries by OccupationSalaries: The issue of lower wages for TampaBay IT occupations was cited as a possible reasonthat employers were facing challenges in hiringand retaining talent. The survey did not clarify theissue since companies generally reported eitherpaying the same or higher for the high demandpositions.According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics(BLS), the Tampa-St. Petersburg-ClearwaterMSA wages are somewhat less than the nationalwages in five of the nine SOC categories, mostnotably for Computer Software Engineers. TheComputer Programmer, which is the most Page 21difficult position to fill, BLS, reports the average hourly rate for Tampa Bay is $2 less than the national
  23. 23. Tampa Bay IT Workforce Analysis – Hillsborough and Pinellas Countyaverage or over $4,000 annually. There is less than a 1% difference in the national average in threecategories in the Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater MSA that employers do not report difficulty filling.We did use wage data for Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater MSA from the BLS to ask local companies ifthey pay around the average salaries reported for IT occupations in the area. Specifically, we were tryingto understand if the small and midsize companies paid less than the average for the area, which wehypothesized could be a reason they are facing greater challenges hiring for their IT-based positions. Ourresearch found that small companies, which are considered to be companies with 100 employees or less,report that they pay above the average wage for Computer Software Engineers, Systems Software andDatabase Administrators. Midsize companies, with greater than 100 employees but less than 500employees, report that they pay the average wage for all of the main information technology occupations.Large companies, with greater than 500 employees, report that they pay above the average wage forComputer and Information Systems Managers and Computer Programmers. Please see Appendix 4, page63 for detailed data.Recruitment of Military Veterans: Military veterans have been identified as a source of talentbecause of their military training, professionalism, commitment, and ability to work under pressure andchanging conditions. In the Tampa Bay area there are a number of initiatives underway to encouragemilitary veterans and their spouses to join the local workforce.Non-commissioned officer training is accepted by some businesses to meet the college requirements forcertain occupations. Several area colleges will award academic credit for military experience on a caseby case basis. The level of training and experience of the officer ranks and non-commissioned officers isperceived by many businesses as exceptional training for men and women so early in their careers. Page 22
  24. 24. Tampa Bay IT Workforce Analysis – Hillsborough and Pinellas CountyFocus Area 4: Regional Marketing and External RecruitingCompanies are seeking to hire new staff members with 3-5 years of experience and knowledge ofenterprise level development logic, who require minimal supervision. Marketing the variety of IT careerpathways will increase the breadth of local talent pool. Strengthening the collaborative relationshipsbetween education and business to focus on students’ transitions from school to the workplace couldimprove the initial productivity of new hires in the workplace.Building and promoting a regional identity is the most effective approach for maintaining a competitiveeconomic landscape. 20 Marketing Tampa Bay as a tech-friendly area has been a point of discussion formany years. Below are the comments from several focus groups and interviews that illustrate thefeedback regarding the critical need to accelerate those marketing efforts. • We didn’t understand all that Tampa Bay had to offer until we moved here. • Young people want excitement. We need to market wakeboarding and use the internet more strategically. • I’ve recruited people that have stayed here 20 years. No one knows about how great the area is. I have an easy time recruiting from the Northeast and Texas and a difficult time recruiting from California. • We need a startup company that makes it big. We need to showcase Tampa Bay as an innovation hub. • Other communities offer cash prizes to resolve IT business problems. It becomes a marketable event, and companies fulfill a need. • Every company is working on its own message, and then including “and we’re in Tampa Bay.” We need a collective message that we can send out. Too much marketing is being done within the community. We need the message going out. • Successful companies have specific messages. We need to follow their examples and come out with a direct message to the rest of the world. • No one is driving a message out. There is too much talking and not enough doing. The marketing that is done is within our community. • We should be marketing to college students. Too many leave the area, because they don’t know what we have here. • You see ads in New York and Chicago that Austin has technology. Tampa needs a presence in other cities. • We need to connect FSU and UF to Tampa. We have the major businesses that could take their students and keep them in Florida.20 Page 23 Regional Business Plan, Tampa Bay Regional Business Plan
  25. 25. Innovation:According to Enterprise Florida, competitiveness and prosperity in the 21st century will be based ontechnology, knowledge, and innovation. There are many formal, informal and self-organized resourcesin the Tampa Bay area dedicated to the development of new technologies and new entrepreneurialbusiness activities, in the form of organizations, events, user groups and meet-up groups.Recently, a $2 million grant was recently awarded by the US Department of Commerce to a partnershipbetween the University of South Florida, the Tampa Bay Technology Forum, and the Tampa Bay Wave toestablish an innovation and incubation hub for technology startups.Collectively these organizations, events and groups demonstrate the readiness of the region to respond toformal assistance in building a stronger IT workforce, and will provide an important foundation for thefuture economic growth of the Tampa Bay. Figure 14 -Tampa Bay Innovation Resources User Groups and Organizations Events MeetUps • Awesome St. Pete • BarCamp • SQL • Awesome Tampa Bay • Hack-a-thon • BI • Tampa Bay Technology • TEDx Tampa Bay • SharePoint Forum • Startup Weekend • Oracle • Tampa Bay WaVE • Startup Bus • JVM • Entrepreneur Social Club • ETC • Tampa Bay Inventors • Tampa Python Council • TampaDev • SEI Alliance • Tampa # (C# and .NET) • Startup Florida • Tampa Web Technology • Ignite Innovation Center • Central Florida Web • Gazelle Lab Developers • USF Connect • Tampa Red Brigade • Tampa Bay 6/20Tampa Bay IT Workforce Analysis Page 24
  26. 26. Tampa Bay IT Workforce Analysis – Hillsborough and Pinellas CountyFocus Area 5: Implementation & CoordinationImmediate action is necessary to impact the current talent gap while also planning for future growth. Thesolutions recommended by the IT Workforce Gap Taskforce involve strengthening partnership andcoordination between business, education, government, and the talent pool.The Taskforce has established Grow Tampa Bay Tech which will provide a central point of contact forthe Taskforce partners, to initiate contact with business and education for the coordination andimplementation of the first round of recommendations critical to creating the desired change.The IT Workforce Taskforce will continue to lead Figure 15: Grow Tampa Bay Tech Leadershipthe implementation process through Grow TampaBay Tech with the Tampa Bay Technology Forum(TBTF) managing the project with a designatedcentral point of contact. The IT Workforce GapTaskforce will provide the necessary oversight ofthe implementation process.The mission of Grow Tampa Bay Tech (GTT) isto implement the first round of recommendationsgenerated from the IT Workforce Gap Analysisproject.The study recommendations (Appendix 1) will beundertaken by local businesses, educational institutions, governmental and economic developmentgroups, or a collaboration of partners. The IT Workforce Taskforce will provide oversight to GrowTampa Bay Tech. During the first year of the project the following recommendations will be initiated. 1. Real-world training for high demand jobs a. Create a series of Exploration labs that allow students to practice technical skills b. Rapidly deploy continuous training in high demand skills c. Business professionals work alongside educators to define and deliver current technical skills 2. Streamlining internships for tomorrow’s workforce a. Develop process to use LinkedIn (LinkedIntern) to connect students to internships in area businesses b. Expand internship opportunities c. Train businesses on best practices for effective internships 3. Innovative career development, recruitment, and retention practices a. Promote participation of Grow Tampa Bay Tech activities among local user groups and Page 25 Meet-Up
  27. 27. Tampa Bay IT Workforce Analysis – Hillsborough and Pinellas County b. Develop a Talent Satisfaction Index to quantify job/life/career satisfaction related to job retention c. Expand recruitment of veterans into IT careers 4. Regional marketing and external recruiting a. Conduct community challenges i.e. Hack-a-thons, code builds, etc. b. Introduce TBTF Chapters in area colleges and universities c. Grow partnerships between businesses and K-12 d. Market area to increase in-migration of IT Talent e. Train HR/Recruiters to sell the area to external talentGrow Tampa Bay Tech will monitor progress of the implementation, communicate with Taskforce andcommunity partners on the progress, and generate commitments from businesses, educational institutions,governments, and community partners.Grow Tampa Bay Tech will design a process for measuring and reporting progress made on eachrecommendation. Page 26
  28. 28. Tampa Bay IT Workforce Analysis – Hillsborough and Pinellas CountyCommunity Involvement Can Bridge the Gap:Solving the current challenges and closing the gaps will require a combined community-wide effortbetween businesses, economic development organizations, colleges and universities, K-12 andpublic/private partnerships. If you are interested in participating in leading or sponsoring any of theactivities presented in this study, please contact Heather Kenyon, CEO, and Tampa Bay TechnologyForum at hkenyon@tbtf.orgTampa Bay IT Workforce Analysis Team • Rick Homans, CEO Tampa Economic Development Corporation, Chair • Mike Meidel, Director, Pinellas County Economic Development • Ed Peachey, CEO, Tampa Bay WorkForce Alliance • Heather Kenyon, CEO, Tampa Bay Technology Forum (TBTF) • Stuart Rogel, President/CEO, Tampa Bay Partnership • Randy Berridge, President, Florida High Tech CorridorReport Prepared by: • Patricia K. Gehant, M.A., CCIO • Clay Gambetti, MBAResearch Consultation: • Guy Hagen, VP Tucker Hall, Strategic Advisor • Dave Sobush, Tampa Bay Partnership • Kristin Daily, PhD, WorkNet Pinellas • Tim Haynes, Tech Columbus Group • Maureen Metcalf, Metcalf and Associates • Bill Lafayette, Regionomics • Steve Kropp and Bill Dobson Florida Department of Economic Opportunity • Kevin Lloyd and Courtney Manning Fairfield Index, Inc.Funding:This report was funded by the Tampa Bay WorkForce Alliance. Secondary funding was provided by theFlorida High Tech Corridor Council, Tampa Hillsborough Economic Development Corporation, PinellasCounty Economic Development, Tampa Bay Technology Forum, and Tampa Bay Partnership.Please visit www.TampaBayITWorkforceSurvey.com to download a copy of the Executive Summary andFull report. Page 27
  29. 29. Appendix 1: Summary of Recommendations: Time CategoryRecommendations Resources Lead FrameReal World Training for High Demand Jobs - Employers reported a need to fill positions requiring specific technical skills. Students reported the desire to practice thetechnical skills they learn and to have access to the most current and beta versions of new technologies. Small and mid-size employers reported the need for graduatesto have more technical skills. 1) Create Exploration Labs for students to practice new skills learned in the classroom, boot camps, and online courses. Similar labs exist within specific colleges and focus on technology taught in the classroom. These labs will cross the boundaries of the individual institutions and Funding/ Short Business Leader engage student, faculty, and businesses in classroom learning, business use cases, and Coordination community competitions. Creative Exploration Labs should include in-market and BETA versions of software and hardware and are intended to be a community wide partnership between educational institutions and business. 2) Develop technical training programs, such as online and boot camp style opportunities for current high demand skills; Java, .NET, Agile development, cloud computing engineers, sales Colleges engineers, CRM and SharePoint. Prepare training in future areas of expansion including Short Coordination TBTF business analytics, big data, desktop support, computer and software engineers. Boot camp Online and online training should be supplemented with student-focused seminars to reinforce the Private Educators skills learned. Market to IT professionals that are seeking updated skills reemployment. 3) IT professionals will coordinate with educators to develop business use cases for high demand TBTF Medium Coordination technical courses including boot camp style sessions, classroom coursework, and Exploration Business Labs. Education 4) Offer quarterly webinars by business experts on new technology to assist faculty and to engage Medium Coordination TBTF with vendors regarding the application of the technology in the workplace. 5) Expand recruitment of returning Veterans and provide supplemental technical training. Medium Coordination Business Leader Increased coordination of career pathways and jobs available. WorkForce Boards Funding/ 6) Participate in Department of Education recognized apprenticeship programs for high demand Long WorkNet Pinellas/ Coordination jobs. TBWorkForce Alliance Tampa Bay IT Workforce Analysis Page 28
  30. 30. Tampa Bay IT Workforce Analysis – Hillsborough and Pinellas County Time CategoryRecommendations Resources Lead Frame 21 7) Expand the use of the IT Competency Model, the Framework for 21st Century skills, and 22 Long Coordination STEM to provide both soft and technical skills for high school and college students to increase Education readiness to work.Streamline Internships for Tomorrow’s Workforce – New hires need to have more real world experiences with technologies, knowledge of enterprise systems, possessthe right mix of academic and workplace competencies, and be proficient in multiple areas. Students are requesting more internship opportunities to allow for multipleinternships to build a portfolio for graduation. Small to mid-size business are willing to offer internships but do not have the structure to manage these programs. 8) Encourage use of social networking tools, such as LinkedIn, to advertise opportunities that would Funding/ allow companies to post opportunities, faculty to recommend students, and students to find Short Coordination TBTF opportunities. Create a team of students, business owners, and educators to define the functionality and process of the online solution. 9) Expand internship opportunities at all postsecondary institutions. While internships are offered at Short Coordination TBTF local colleges and universities, when students begin to increase participation through marketing Education efforts, more opportunities will be needed. 23 10) Increase the capacity of career centers to provide students with career pathways and to be Short Coordination Education prepared to compete for internships earlier in their education. 11) Provide training to businesses on best practices for setting up internships. Include discussion with Short Coordination TBTF students to provide feedback on the “best” and “worst” internship experiences. 12) Conduct internship fairs to connect students with employers. Motivate students to seek multiple Short Coordination internship opportunities throughout their college experience that will expand their knowledge, TBTF technical skills, and awareness of local businesses. 13) Businesses are requiring employees to have a broader range of leadership and technical skills. Long Coordination Motivate students seeking non-technical degrees to seek a double major/minor in the technology Education field. 21 Framework for 21st Century Learning is a holistic view of 21st century teaching and learning that combines a discrete focus on 21st century student outcomes, blending specific skills, content knowledge, expertise, and literacy. http://www.p21.org/overview. 22 STEM Education is an interdisciplinary approach to learning where rigorous academic concepts are coupled with real-world lessons as students apply science, technology, engineering, and mathematics in contexts that make connections between school, community, work, and the global enterprise enabling the development of STEM literacy and with it the ability to compete in the new economy (Tsupros, 2009).” 23 Career Pathways is a framework for connecting a series of educational programs with integrated work experience and support services. The goal is to provide a seamless system of career exploration, preparation, and skills upgrades linked to academic credits & credentials, available with multiple entry and exit points spanning middle and secondary school, post secondary institutions, adult education, and workplace education. Career Pathways as a Systematic Framework, Page 29 League for Innovation in Community College, January 2007.
  31. 31. Tampa Bay IT Workforce Analysis – Hillsborough and Pinellas County Time CategoryRecommendations Resources Lead FrameInnovative Career Development, Recruitment, and Retention Practices: To be competitive in the global market, business productivity requires the continuousacquisition of new skills that expand industry-wide technical competencies. New skills can be obtained through continuously available skills training and the retraining oftalent with non-technical job experience. 14) Leverage existing or new channels to recruit external IT Talent. Market the numerous Short Coordination Public/Private communities of interest that will support the skills development of staff. Examples include: SQL, Partnership Oracle SharePoint, JAVA, .NET, and other programming and IT skill areas. 15) Develop a Talent Satisfaction Index that will quantify job/life/career satisfaction and job retention. Medium Coordination Private/Public Begin to measure why talent remains loyal to the company. Partnership 16) Explore practices to encourage and support talent development and career growth (mentoring, Medium Coordination Business lifelong learning, IT leadership training, and apprenticeship programs). 17) Modify degree programs to accommodate students returning for a technical degree but have Long Coordination Education already completed non-technical degrees and have job experience. 18) Explore the range of practices that will support healthy collaboration between businesses to foster Long Coordination TBTF an innovative community.Regional Marketing and External Recruiting: Companies are seeking talent with 3-5 years experience and knowledge of enterprise level development, who require littlesupervision. Marketing the variety of IT career pathways will increase the local talent pool. The strengthening of relationships between education and business will increasethe success of transition from school to the workforce. Innovation is a catalyst for an expanding the technology community along with engaging students, andattracting/recruiting an experienced talent. Funding/ 19) Establish relationships with student organizations such as TBTF Student Chapters at colleges Short Coordination TBTF and universities in Tampa Bay. 20) Initiate recruiting trips around high demand skills by conducting marketing campaigns to target cities and by attending convergence events, universities, or virtual events to increase the in- Short Coordination migration of IT talent by marketing Tampa Bay nationally. Efforts will be coordinated with EDC EDOs groups to identity market information and resources. The campaign will use social media and technology networks. 21) Provide training to HR, recruiters, and career placement professionals to increase knowledge of Funding/ Short how to market the Tampa Bay area to prospective candidates. Provide talking points and other Coordination EDOs collateral resources. Page 30

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