Success with Social: The New Enterprise

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  • The way we go about our lead generation campaigns is we base them on a Unified strategy- we determine the goals of the client and these can be refined once we discuss a little more but then we also factor in the purpose of the potential leads who are seeking information. People are coming to Social Media Today to get information and make their business better. They are looking for a solution. Jive can be that solutionWe can guarantee the Social Media Today leads are better qualified because of the quality of the content, and the unique vision that understands what business you are in and what you are trying to achieve. We are not trying to simply deliver leads, we are trying to cultivate relationships and connect you to real customers.
  • http://www.marketingprofs.com/charts/2013/11340/digital-marketers-on-twitter-share-retweet?adref=nl080613Quote on lower person reading article.Social Media Today’s number’s are growing exponentially lately, which is great for Jive because as we develop new content we ccanWE are unique in our reach
  • We’d love to propose a content hub as a way to organize this lead generation campaign for Jive. The content hub can be specific to each of the verticals you are looking to focus on or can be more general to incorporate all three verticals and maybe more as the campaign grows. We envision leveraging existing Jive eBooks, whitepapers, and webinars to begin lead generation immediately (in the next few slides, I’ll show you how Oracle does this)
  • At this stage of Social Media Maturity no one person really owns social media in the org. Typically there are 2 different approaches to kicking off social media in an organization:The first is when one or more employees take social media into their own hands, without any direction or leadership from management. The individual operates from their own intitiative because they recognize the value of social for their job or team. This may look like a sales person creating a company twitter account as a way of finding prospects, or someone in marketing that creates a company profile on any of the social networks such as Facebook or LinkedIn. The other approach is when “social media” is assigned to someone in addition to their everyday tasks. This may be an intern, someone in customer support or the marketing department.Typically there are no guidelines or policies set, which leads to the activity on social media being unco-ordinated and usually results are not tracked or measured. In a large organization there may be separate social advocates working in parallel – setting up separate company social profiles and publishing content or messages that are not aligned.
  • We view social maturity as 3 key stages:Social AdvocacySocial TeamsSocial OrganizationToday, we review- Firstly, what defines each stage as a benchmark for your org. - Secondly, what the blockers are at this stage, and risks of staying at lower stages.- Lastly, how to advance your org’s social maturity
  • At this stage of Social Media Maturity no one person really owns social media in the org. Typically there are 2 different approaches to kicking off social media in an organization:The first is when one or more employees take social media into their own hands, without any direction or leadership from management. The individual operates from their own intitiative because they recognize the value of social for their job or team. This may look like a sales person creating a company twitter account as a way of finding prospects, or someone in marketing that creates a company profile on any of the social networks such as Facebook or LinkedIn. The other approach is when “social media” is assigned to someone in addition to their everyday tasks. This may be an intern, someone in customer support or the marketing department.Typically there are no guidelines or policies set, which leads to the activity on social media being unco-ordinated and usually results are not tracked or measured. In a large organization there may be separate social advocates working in parallel – setting up separate company social profiles and publishing content or messages that are not aligned.
  • This stage is very difficult for those individuals that are pioneering their companies social media activities, because there is a lack of clear direction, strategy and leadership. Some businesses may even experience some form of “social anarachy”. According to Altimeter, 22% of Enterprise organizations still do not have a dedicated social media team.This results in several key blockers:- Social advocates in an organization may be executing great social media activities. However with the lack of leadership, individuals typically aren’t able to measure the results and success of social media activities. It’s very difficult to improve campaigns or show business value of social media and get more resources and budget.Secondly, there is a lack of a social media policy. Without a social media policy, there are no rules or guidelines on how an employee should conduct themselves on social media. This can have negative affects on your brand messaging and reputation. A lack of policy also muzzles engagement and prevents deployment of social tools beyond individual social media managers or small teams.- Lastly, poor or non-existent support from executive leadership is a big blocker for social advocates and prevents the organization from establishing resources and broader strategy for implementation.
  • For organizations that are still in the first stage of social maturity, here are recommendations:- Increase your efficiency and effectiveness by focusing and measuring your efforts. Start with small, targeted activities that have clear success metrics. Once you have proven the success of your social media activity, you are likely to receive higher engagement and attention from your managers and leadership team. - Make sure your activities are tied to business goals such as improving reach of marketing campaigns, decreasing customer support response times or increasing HR job applications. This is another way to prove the value of social media to your superiors.Lastly, maximize your impact with a defined social media strategy. This helps to avoid ad hoc activities that typically don’t provide significant value or results. Make sure to involve other departments so that your strategy isn’t siloed, and can deliver a company-wide approach.
  • Over time, social advocates are able to build on their success, and transform ad hoc activities into official social media programs that involve multiple people in content creation, monitoring and engagement. Each social team is typically departmentally-oriented, with its own social relationship platform to coordinate team members and manage accounts – often identified as a ‘hub & spoke’ model. Teams execute strategies on a departmental level, but there’s noorganization-wide communication plan for sorting and assigning incoming messages or contributing and approving outgoing messages. You’ve got budget and have purchased software to advance your efforts, like HootSuite, to align the activities of your team, and possibly work with others within your organization or externally, with agencies or contractors.Your department head has vested interest in your success, but your executive team may not – due to lack of understanding, or lack of clear results. In larger organizations you may have a ‘multiple hub & spoke’ model, whereby there are several teams working in different department, but they’re typically working in silo’s, rather than working towards a company-wide social vision.
  • There are a number of blockers that existing when individual teams are working on their own strategy, rather than a company-wide vision.Primarly – there is no central hub for social media strategy, which creates a lack of coordination between teams. Secondly – there are IT headaches as social platforms (both internal and external) clash with legacy tools like intranets, employee logins. This increases in complexity if separate social teams are using different social platforms. This is becoming more of a prominent issue as marketing departments are able to purchase their own cloud software. No longer are IT required for the implementation of marketing software.Lastly - Social exists in a vacuum, even within particular business functions. For example, social is not integrated with overall content strategy, customer service processes, business intelligence, etcTraining/certification in social tools may be out of date if team was an early adopter but education no longer a priority (perhaps because early social media programs did not prove business value)
  • To improve the coordination of social media across the organization there are some key steps:Firstly, consider the goals of every department and broaden your social media strategy to address them. - Next,Protect your brand with social tools, policies, and training that support governance and security. This is even more important if you are in a highly regulated industry and compliance to marketing and social media guidelines is not just a nice-to-have, but a must-have. There are big fines for companies that don’t adhere to industry guidelines.- Increase operational efficiency and minimize risk by coordinating regions and departments through centrally-managed content and workflows. For example, if a customer makes a complaint – this conversation should be directed to customer support, whereas a response to a marketing campaign can be handled by the community team.Lastly, understand the impact on GTM and R&D initiatives by integrating social data with other top-level sources – example is the integration of your CRM platform and your social media platform. This way leads can easily be passed to sales and a more comprehensive customer profile established.
  • A social organization is the deep integration of social media into the organization to drive business goals.At this stage there is an organization-wide social media strategy, along with a governance model for future decision making. What was previously a series of initiatives driven by marketing or PR, is now evolving into a social organization movement that looks to scale and integration across the organization.A leadership group has mapped out business processes to harmonize social media teams, specifying how social media messages are monitored, evaluated, assigned and responded to. A single social relationship platform is adopted across the enterprise, enabling cross-team workflows, improving productivity, and increasing revenue. During the Social Organization stage, social media becomes integrated into the core functions of the company.For example, instead of managing an isolated social media service team, the business incorporates social media into the overall customer service process. As social media is operationalized, different business functions are able to share data and coordinate their activities to meet the needs of customers. In time, the entire workforce is tapped to amplify the organization’s content strategy on public social networks.According to Altimeter, only 26% of organizations have a holistic social media strategy – whereby a common enterprise vision exists.
  • With a solid foundation of policies, platforms, and processes, your organization is poised to maximize the business value of social media with the most important ingredient of all: people.According to Altimeter research, only 18% of companies said that their employees have a good or very good understanding of their social media policies.Education and training company wide of social media policy and strategy is the key to success. Unless your employees understand how social will help deliver business goals, company wide adoption and acceptance will be difficult.
  • At this stage there may be some friction within the workflows, procedures and best practices which were established in earlier stages. They may have been too limited and not specific enough for company wide adoption. At scale reaches different departments, geographic locations and regions, there will be a need to adapt to the evolving needs.
  • And here’s what it looks like. It’s important to remember, too, that your organization may be at multiple stages at once. Perhaps the North American corporation is operating at a more sophistacted level than in the UK, or maybe you have some departments at the teams stage, while others have emerging advocates. The level of Social media adoption and acceptance throughout an organization can vary. Regardless of where they’re at, everything in the social media landscape today tells us that it’s moving towards the organization stage, and maturation of strategy and efforts is increasing quarter over quarter. Employ software – a social relationship platform like HootSuite – to make this evolution smoother, safer, more effective. Summary of the 3 stages of maturity as outlined by HootSuite.:Advocacy:Activity is uncoordinatedNo one owns Social MediaNo unified social relationship platformTeams:Siloed social media activityTeams execute on department levelNo over arching goalsOrganization:Clear leader for social strategyOrganization wide effortsIntegrated in to business functions
  • LogMeIn was founded over ten years ago by Mike Simon (our CEO) and Marton Anka (our CTO) on the very simple premise that was an easier, more reliable, robust and secure way to connect computers, people and their devices. The idea has grown over time and been adopted by millions worldwide including some of the best known companies in the world.
  • Success with Social: The New Enterprise

    1. 1. Success with Social: The New Enterprise #SMTLive
    2. 2. Thanks to our Sponsor
    3. 3. Join the Conversation… 157,345 #SMTLive
    4. 4. Our Speakers Susan Perry Specializing in brand management for 6+ years, Susan has created and managed a variety of content–from television commercials to print and outdoor campaigns, working with Procter and Gamble to launch 2 product lines throughout Asia. @mavenites Alan Belniak works at LogMeIn, a Boston-based software company focusing connecting people to data and devices securely and remotely, as the company's Director of Content Marketing. Prior to that, Alan led up the social media efforts at PTC, a Boston-based B2B software technology company focused in the manufacturing space. @abelniak. Heidi Ambler, Director, IBM Social Business manages the product and marketing team responsible for IBM's social business platform which includes a mixture of product, offering and program management. Ambler is responsible for setting the product requirements for the technology, contributing to the efforts in marketing the products, serving as an advocate for customers and partners. @heidi_ambler Paul Dunay, moderator, is an award-winning B2B marketing expert with more than 20 years’ success in generating demand and creating buzz for leading technology, consumer products, financial services and professional services organizations. @PaulDunay #SMTLive
    5. 5. Social Media Maturity
    6. 6. Maturity Stages • Social Advocacy • Social Teams • Social Organization
    7. 7. Social Advocacy
    8. 8. Social Advocacy - Blockers • Poor measurement of social media activities • Lack of a social media policy • Low or non-existent understanding from executive leadership
    9. 9. Social Advocacy - Next Steps • Focus and measure your efforts • Tie to business goals • Maximize your impact with a strategy
    10. 10. Social Teams
    11. 11. Social Teams - Blockers • Lack of coordination between teams. • IT headaches as social platforms clash with legacy tools • Social exists in a vacuum, even within particular business functions.
    12. 12. Social Teams - Next Steps • Consider the goals of every department • Protect your brand • Coordinating regions and departments to minimize risk and increase efficiency • Understand the impact on GTM and R&D initiatives
    13. 13. Social Organization
    14. 14. Social Organization - Optimization With a solid foundation of policies, platforms, and processes, your organization is poised to maximize the business value of social media with the most important ingredient of all: People.
    15. 15. Social Organization - Blockers • Workflows, procedures and best practices established in earlier stages may be too limited/specific and not adaptable to evolving needs
    16. 16. Social Media Maturity Model Advocacy • Activity is uncoordinated • No one owns Social Media • No unified social relationship platform Teams • Siloed social media activity • Teams execute on department level • No over arching goals Organization • Clear leader for social strategy • Organization wide efforts • Integrated in to business functions
    17. 17. Thank You Have questions? @HootBusiness peter.b@hootsuite.com
    18. 18. Success with Social: The New Enterprise Alan Belniak / @abelniak Director of Content Marketing LogMeIn © 2013, LogMeIn, Inc. | The Capability Cloud TM CONFIDENTIAL - FOR INTERNAL USE ONLY
    19. 19. LogMeIn: A Quick Look • Publicly traded Cloud/SaaS leader – $100M IPO in 2009, $700m market cap, traded on NASDAQ: LOGM. • Worldwide operations with 600 employees, headquarters in Boston, Mass and offices in US, Hungary, Ireland, UK, Australia, India, and The Netherlands. • Proprietary and scalable cloud platform that connects hundreds of millions of devices around the world • Freemium and disruptive business models attract 50+ million active users and more than 540,000 customers • Hundreds of thousands of SMBs, major global companies: Microsoft, The Capability Cloud TM © 2013, LogMeIn, Inc. | Vodafone, Dell, Virgin 19 #SMTLive - @abelniak
    20. 20. 20 © 2013, LogMeIn, Inc. | The Capability Cloud TM #SMTLive - @abelniak
    21. 21. 21 © 2013, LogMeIn, Inc. | The Capability Cloud TM #SMTLive - @abelniak
    22. 22. 22 © 2013, LogMeIn, Inc. | The Capability Cloud TM #SMTLive - @abelniak
    23. 23. 23 © 2013, LogMeIn, Inc. | The Capability Cloud TM #SMTLive - @abelniak
    24. 24. 24 © 2013, LogMeIn, Inc. | The Capability Cloud TM #SMTLive - @abelniak
    25. 25. Thanks! Alan Belniak Director of Content Marketing LogMeIn www.abelniak.com www.twitter.com/abelniak image sources: http://www.weddingsalon.com/blog/index.php/2012/03/02/our-del-postococktail-party/ ; http://www.flickr.com/photos/schoolstreet/163727710/ ; http://www.flickr.com/photos/mikeblogs/4959402841 ; 25 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:CT-RI-MA_Tripoint.JPG © 2013, LogMeIn, Inc. | The Capability Cloud TM #SMTLive - @abelniak
    26. 26. Join us next week… 11/5 Making Predictive Analytics Productive: Are You Learning from Social Data? 11/7 Social Media Hacks and Hijacks: The Best Tips and Tricks to Maximize Your Social ROI

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