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3 C H A P T E R The Biomechanics  of Resistance Exercise Everett Harman
Chapter Outline  The musculoskeletal system  Human strength and power  Sources of resistance to muscle contraction  Jo...
Muscle Pulling Force Manifested  As a Pushing Force
Muscle Pulling Force Manifested  As a Pulling Force
Front View  of Adult Male  Human Skeleton
Rear View  of Adult Male  Human Skeleton
The Vertebral Column
Front View  of Adult Male  Human Skeletal  Musculature
Rear View  of Adult Male  Human Skeletal  Musculature
A Lever
A First-Class Lever (The Forearm)
A Second-Class Lever (The Foot)
A Third-Class Lever (The Forearm)
Changes in Mechanical Advantage:  Knee Extension and Flexion
Changes in Mechanical Advantage: Elbow Flexion
Changes in Mechanical Advantage:  During Weightlifting
M ost of the skeletal muscles operate at a considerable mechanical disadvantage. Thus, during sports and other physical ac...
Variations in Tendon Insertion
Anatomical Planes  of the Human Body
Muscle Fiber Arrangements
Interaction Between Actin and Myosin Filaments
Resistive Torque:  Free Weight
Resistive Torque: Weight Stack
W hen a weight is held in a static position or when it is moved at a constant velocity, it exerts constant resistance, onl...
Supporting the Vertebral Column During Lifting:  The Fluid Ball
R esistance training is quite safe compared with other sports and fitness activities. Prudence can keep injuries to a mini...
S pecificity is a major consideration when designing an exercise program to improve performance in a particular sport acti...
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Ch3 (31 57)

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Ch3 (31 57)

  1. 1. 3 C H A P T E R The Biomechanics of Resistance Exercise Everett Harman
  2. 2. Chapter Outline  The musculoskeletal system  Human strength and power  Sources of resistance to muscle contraction  Joint biomechanics: concerns in lifting  Movement analysis and exercise prescription
  3. 3. Muscle Pulling Force Manifested As a Pushing Force
  4. 4. Muscle Pulling Force Manifested As a Pulling Force
  5. 5. Front View of Adult Male Human Skeleton
  6. 6. Rear View of Adult Male Human Skeleton
  7. 7. The Vertebral Column
  8. 8. Front View of Adult Male Human Skeletal Musculature
  9. 9. Rear View of Adult Male Human Skeletal Musculature
  10. 10. A Lever
  11. 11. A First-Class Lever (The Forearm)
  12. 12. A Second-Class Lever (The Foot)
  13. 13. A Third-Class Lever (The Forearm)
  14. 14. Changes in Mechanical Advantage: Knee Extension and Flexion
  15. 15. Changes in Mechanical Advantage: Elbow Flexion
  16. 16. Changes in Mechanical Advantage: During Weightlifting
  17. 17. M ost of the skeletal muscles operate at a considerable mechanical disadvantage. Thus, during sports and other physical activities, forces in the muscles and tendons are much higher than those exerted by the hands or feet on external objects or the ground. 
  18. 18. Variations in Tendon Insertion
  19. 19. Anatomical Planes of the Human Body
  20. 20. Muscle Fiber Arrangements
  21. 21. Interaction Between Actin and Myosin Filaments
  22. 22. Resistive Torque: Free Weight
  23. 23. Resistive Torque: Weight Stack
  24. 24. W hen a weight is held in a static position or when it is moved at a constant velocity, it exerts constant resistance, only in the downward direction. However, upward or lateral acceleration of the weight requires additional force. 
  25. 25. Supporting the Vertebral Column During Lifting: The Fluid Ball
  26. 26. R esistance training is quite safe compared with other sports and fitness activities. Prudence can keep injuries to a minimum. Basic safety principles include good lifting form, appropriate resistance, accommodation to injuries, balance, and variety. 
  27. 27. S pecificity is a major consideration when designing an exercise program to improve performance in a particular sport activity. The sport movement must be analyzed qualitatively or quantitatively to determine the specific joint movements that contribute to the whole-body movement. Exercises that use similar joint movements are then emphasized in the resistance training program. 

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