Gifted & Talented PLM Years 7 & 8 Term 1, 2009 J. Smith
Definitions of Giftedness
<ul><li>http:// assessment.usatests.com/iqtest/?v = </li></ul>
 
Renzulli’s Three-ring Model
Activity:   HOT or NOT
Student feedback 2008
<ul><li>‘ just because we may be smarter doesn't mean we don't need time to ourselves to be kids and have fun. Most of the...
<ul><li>‘ I enjoy challenging myself so I can do better, but it just becomes too much sometimes.  It's hard to do work to ...
<ul><li>‘ I really enjoy our class because we can all work at the same pace and learn things really quickly. I have found ...
<ul><li>So what’s it </li></ul><ul><li>all about? </li></ul>
Underachievement <ul><li>‘ there is no doubt that many gifted students underachieve quite deliberately in an attempt to wi...
Activity: <ul><li>Bright Child/Gifted Learner </li></ul>
Constructs abstractions Grasps the meaning 1-2 repetitions for mastery 6-8 repetitions for mastery Already knows Learns wi...
Is keenly observant Is alert Is highly self-critical Is pleased with own learning Thrives on complexity Enjoys straightfor...
Characteristics as Learners <ul><li>The ability to ask reflective and probing, sometimes provocative, questions </li></ul>...
Characteristics as Learners   cont. <ul><li>Reasons at a level more usually found in a student some years older </li></ul>...
Social/Emotional Characteristics <ul><li>Many gifted students have: </li></ul><ul><li>A feeling of needing to ‘dumb down’ ...
Social/Emotional Characteristics   cont. <ul><li>An unusually mature sense of humour </li></ul><ul><li>A preference for th...
One of the greatest gifts we can give a gifted student is the opportunity and encouragement to risk temporary ‘failure’ in...
What kind of teacher? <ul><li>☑  High degree of intelligence </li></ul><ul><li>☑   High degree of intellectual honesty </l...
Activity : Effective Questioning <ul><li>To be on a quest is nothing more or less than to become an asker of questions   <...
Differentiating the  Curriculum
Pre-testing
Using data to inform practice <ul><li>Data available: </li></ul><ul><li>AIM/NAPLAN   (available on Intranet) </li></ul><ul...
Models of Differentiation <ul><li>Maker Model </li></ul><ul><li>Williams’ Model </li></ul><ul><li>Kaplan Model </li></ul><...
<ul><li>Content modifications   for gifted students should: </li></ul><ul><li>be abstract, complex, varied </li></ul><ul><...
Examples <ul><li>We modify content in the Telescope Program through: </li></ul><ul><li>Designing units at a higher VELS le...
<ul><li>Process modifications   for gifted students should: </li></ul><ul><li>involve higher order thinking processes </li...
Examples <ul><li>We modify process in the Telescope Program at MacKillop through: </li></ul><ul><li>Asking high-order and ...
Product modifications   for gifted students should: •  involve real world problems •  be for real world audiences •  requi...
Examples <ul><li>We modify product in the Telescope Program at MacKillop through: </li></ul><ul><li>Presenting to real aud...
<ul><li>Learning environment modifications   for gifted students should: </li></ul><ul><li>be flexible and open </li></ul>...
Examples <ul><li>We modify the learning environment in the Telescope Program at MacKillop through: </li></ul><ul><li>Timet...
Effective Practices Integrated Learning Tasks Ability grouping Using  technology- wikis for learning Faster pacing Using r...
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Gifted &amp; Talented PLM

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Gifted &amp; Talented PLM

  1. 1. Gifted & Talented PLM Years 7 & 8 Term 1, 2009 J. Smith
  2. 2. Definitions of Giftedness
  3. 3. <ul><li>http:// assessment.usatests.com/iqtest/?v = </li></ul>
  4. 5. Renzulli’s Three-ring Model
  5. 6. Activity: HOT or NOT
  6. 7. Student feedback 2008
  7. 8. <ul><li>‘ just because we may be smarter doesn't mean we don't need time to ourselves to be kids and have fun. Most of the time we are pressured to always behave and always get good marks, its like the teachers don't understand that we are still only 14 and we make mistakes and we need time to do things well. Also my year’s telescope class is constantly being told that we aren't good enough, and our marks aren't good enough, just because we can't always do our work to the best of our abilities, not because were not trying but because we have so much on our plate, that we can’t possibly do everything well.’ </li></ul>
  8. 9. <ul><li>‘ I enjoy challenging myself so I can do better, but it just becomes too much sometimes. It's hard to do work to proper standards if you have too much to do and not enough time.’ </li></ul><ul><li>‘ Telescope students are often seen as more responsible and are able to handle a lot more than they really can. It is unfair to the telescope students as we are really just going through the same things as our other peers.’ </li></ul>
  9. 10. <ul><li>‘ I really enjoy our class because we can all work at the same pace and learn things really quickly. I have found that I had stopped listening to what teachers say after about 15 minutes…because they have explain every single little thing when I understand what they are teaching already. Some of the other students (ones who aren't in the telescope class) judge us and don't really socialize with us just because we are in the telescope program.’ </li></ul>
  10. 11. <ul><li>So what’s it </li></ul><ul><li>all about? </li></ul>
  11. 12. Underachievement <ul><li>‘ there is no doubt that many gifted students underachieve quite deliberately in an attempt to win social acceptance by their classmates and teachers.’ </li></ul><ul><li>‘ Since his strengths are undervalued by his peers, he may come to seek peer approval by seeking to develop the skills and attributes which are valued…by becoming the class clown, gaining leadership status in a group of disaffected students of much lower intellectual capacity, or developing a sporting talent at the expense of his academic ability.’ </li></ul><ul><li>- Professor Miraca Gross (1989) </li></ul>
  12. 13. Activity: <ul><li>Bright Child/Gifted Learner </li></ul>
  13. 14. Constructs abstractions Grasps the meaning 1-2 repetitions for mastery 6-8 repetitions for mastery Already knows Learns with ease Shows strong feelings and opinions Listens with interest Beyond the group Top group Discusses in detail, elaborates Answers the questions Plays around, yet tests well Works hard Has wild, silly ideas Has good ideas Is mentally and physically involved Is attentive Is highly curious Is interested Asks the questions Knows the answers Gifted Learner Bright Child
  14. 15. Is keenly observant Is alert Is highly self-critical Is pleased with own learning Thrives on complexity Enjoys straightforward, sequential presentations Good guesser Good memoriser Inventor Technician Manipulates information Absorbs information Enjoys learning Enjoys school Creates a new design Copies accurately Is intense Is receptive Initiates projects Completes assignments Draws inferences Grasps the meaning Prefers adults Enjoys peers Gifted Learner Bright Child
  15. 16. Characteristics as Learners <ul><li>The ability to ask reflective and probing, sometimes provocative, questions </li></ul><ul><li>The capacity to see and create patterns and relationships in their field of special ability </li></ul><ul><li>Can become deeply absorbed in work that they find interesting </li></ul><ul><li>Unusually fast rate of learning </li></ul>
  16. 17. Characteristics as Learners cont. <ul><li>Reasons at a level more usually found in a student some years older </li></ul><ul><li>Extremely well developed memory </li></ul><ul><li>Dislike of slow-paced work </li></ul><ul><li>Many gifted students have a preference for independent work </li></ul><ul><li>It is unusual for a gifted student to have only one area of high ability </li></ul>
  17. 18. Social/Emotional Characteristics <ul><li>Many gifted students have: </li></ul><ul><li>A feeling of needing to ‘dumb down’ and hide their abilities for peer acceptance </li></ul><ul><li>A high level of emotional intensity </li></ul><ul><li>An unusual ability to empathise with the feelings of other students or adults </li></ul><ul><li>An unusually well developed sense of justice and fairness </li></ul>
  18. 19. Social/Emotional Characteristics cont. <ul><li>An unusually mature sense of humour </li></ul><ul><li>A preference for the companionship of older students </li></ul><ul><li>A tendency towards perfectionism </li></ul><ul><li>A strong attachment to one or two close friends rather than more casual relationships with a larger group </li></ul>
  19. 20. One of the greatest gifts we can give a gifted student is the opportunity and encouragement to risk temporary ‘failure’ in the secure environment of a classroom which encourages all students, including the gifted, to let their reach exceed their grasp. - Professor Miraca Gross, UNSW
  20. 21. What kind of teacher? <ul><li>☑ High degree of intelligence </li></ul><ul><li>☑ High degree of intellectual honesty </li></ul><ul><li>☑ Expertise in a specific academic area </li></ul><ul><li>☑ A genuine interest in and liking of gifted learners </li></ul><ul><li>☑ Strong belief in individual differences </li></ul><ul><li>☑ Highly developed teaching skill </li></ul><ul><li>☑ Self-directed in own learning </li></ul><ul><li>☑ Level-headed and emotionally stable </li></ul>- Karen B. Rogers, ‘Re-Forming Gifted Education’, 2002
  21. 22. Activity : Effective Questioning <ul><li>To be on a quest is nothing more or less than to become an asker of questions </li></ul><ul><li>Sam Keen </li></ul><ul><li>Judge others by their questions rather than by their answers </li></ul><ul><li>Voltaire </li></ul><ul><li>There was no telling what people might find out once they felt free to ask whatever questions they wanted to. </li></ul><ul><li>Joseph Heller </li></ul><ul><li>Online Resources </li></ul>
  22. 23. Differentiating the Curriculum
  23. 24. Pre-testing
  24. 25. Using data to inform practice <ul><li>Data available: </li></ul><ul><li>AIM/NAPLAN (available on Intranet) </li></ul><ul><li>HAST yr 7 ’09 (available from J. Smith) </li></ul><ul><li>PAT Maths </li></ul><ul><li>PAT Comprehension </li></ul><ul><li>(have been e-mailed to all staff) </li></ul>
  25. 26. Models of Differentiation <ul><li>Maker Model </li></ul><ul><li>Williams’ Model </li></ul><ul><li>Kaplan Model </li></ul><ul><li>Online resources </li></ul>
  26. 27. <ul><li>Content modifications for gifted students should: </li></ul><ul><li>be abstract, complex, varied </li></ul><ul><li>involve issues of organisation, study of people, methods of inquiry </li></ul>The following is taken from The Maker Model:
  27. 28. Examples <ul><li>We modify content in the Telescope Program through: </li></ul><ul><li>Designing units at a higher VELS level </li></ul><ul><li>Allowing for student questioning/inquiry </li></ul><ul><li>Compacting the curriculum </li></ul><ul><li>Exploring a wider, more challenging range of materials/resources </li></ul><ul><li>Extra-curricular extension activities </li></ul>
  28. 29. <ul><li>Process modifications for gifted students should: </li></ul><ul><li>involve higher order thinking processes </li></ul><ul><li>promote creative and critical thinking </li></ul><ul><li>require problem solving </li></ul><ul><li>involve group interaction </li></ul><ul><li>have variable levels of pacing </li></ul><ul><li>allow for debriefing of the process </li></ul><ul><li>involve open-endedness </li></ul><ul><li>allow for freedom of choice </li></ul>
  29. 30. Examples <ul><li>We modify process in the Telescope Program at MacKillop through: </li></ul><ul><li>Asking high-order and open questions </li></ul><ul><li>Posing real-life problems </li></ul><ul><li>Faster pacing of activities </li></ul><ul><li>Variation in grouping & assessment </li></ul>
  30. 31. Product modifications for gifted students should: • involve real world problems • be for real world audiences • require real deadlines • require transformation of learning • involve appropriate assessment and evaluation • involve extended or accelerated outcomes
  31. 32. Examples <ul><li>We modify product in the Telescope Program at MacKillop through: </li></ul><ul><li>Presenting to real audiences </li></ul><ul><li>Using real-life situations/problems </li></ul><ul><li>Offering more in-depth assessment tasks over a longer time period </li></ul><ul><li>Using rubrics created against higher VELS standards </li></ul><ul><li>Providing choice of tasks/modes of presentation </li></ul>
  32. 33. <ul><li>Learning environment modifications for gifted students should: </li></ul><ul><li>be flexible and open </li></ul><ul><li>encourage independent and intrinsic learning </li></ul><ul><li>be accepting and non-judgemental </li></ul><ul><li>encourage complex and abstract thought </li></ul>
  33. 34. Examples <ul><li>We modify the learning environment in the Telescope Program at MacKillop through: </li></ul><ul><li>Timetabling classes into student-centred classrooms </li></ul><ul><li>Providing access to technology </li></ul><ul><li>Additional incursions/excursions </li></ul><ul><li>Celebrating individual differences </li></ul>
  34. 35. Effective Practices Integrated Learning Tasks Ability grouping Using technology- wikis for learning Faster pacing Using real-world situations and problems Student-led classes Using experts Student-generated rubrics Negotiated Assessment Tasks Higher order thinking/questioning

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