Case study2 videogames text reader relations

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Case study2 videogames text reader relations

  1. 1. How do postmodern texts challenge traditional text-reader relations?<br />Postmodern Mediacase study 2 - videogames<br />
  2. 2. Traditional text-reader relations<br />The text is central to the generation of meaning<br />The reader responds to what the text says<br />The text = <br />Book<br />film <br />TV programme <br />newspaper <br />magazine <br />webpage <br />videogame <br />radio programme<br />This privileges the position of the producer / author – they are more important than us, mere readers<br />
  3. 3. Traditional text-reader relations<br />Marxist media / cultural studies theorist, Stuart Hall argues that we adopt one of three possible positions when ‘reading’ a text:<br />Preferred reading – where we fully agree with what we ‘read’<br />Negotiated reading – where we partly agree, partly disagree<br />Oppositional reading - where we fully disagree with what we ‘read’<br />These ideas are old – are they still true?<br />Roland Barthes, film & cultural studies theorist, proclaimed ‘the death of the author and the birth of the reader’ in relation to film<br />This is a rejection of the notion of the auteur (author) as the supreme dictator of meaning in the text<br />
  4. 4. Traditional text-reader relations<br />Do videogames challenge these ideas of traditional text-reader relations?<br />Is the producer or the player in control of how a player makes sense of a game?<br />
  5. 5. Traditional text-reader relations<br />Arguably, videogames mark the end of traditional text-reader relations<br />It is the player who determines how to play and how to interact with the narrative structure of the game – whether to play by the rules or not, whether to use cheat codes or not<br />Without the player, there is no game – if the player doesn’t play, then nothing happens – the player is in total control<br />If watching a film and you fall asleep, the film continues, you miss part of the story – the film’s characters know the story but you don’t<br />Online gaming – nothing happens without the active participation of the players – no game without the players<br />
  6. 6. Traditional text-reader relations<br />Just as arguably, it can be said that videogames do not mark the end of traditional text-reader relations<br />Offline gaming – you are dependent on following the narrative of the game to make progress – that narrative is written by the producers, not the player<br />Are videogames the first medium to offer the ‘reader’ narrative choices? No<br />http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fighting_Fantasy<br />

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