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Leveraging SMEs’ Strenght for INSPIRE

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Presentation at the INSPIRE Conference - Florence, 27th June 2013

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Leveraging SMEs’ Strenght for INSPIRE

  1. 1. 1/18 Leveraging SMEs’ Strenght for INSPIRE Glenn Vancauwenberghe (KU Leuven SADL) Piergiorgio Cipriano (EC JRC) Contributors: Giacomo Martirano (Epsilon Italia) Elena Roglia (EC JRC) Danny Vandenbroucke (KU Leuven SADL) INSPIRE Conference Firenze, June 27th 2013
  2. 2. 2/18 key questions 1. What is the size of the Geo-ICT sector in Europe? How many Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs)? And how big is the market? 2. What are the main characteristics of these Geo-ICT companies? And what are their core activities? 3. How is the Geo-ICT sector currently involved in the implementation of INSPIRE? 4. Do Geo-ICT sector companies in Europe have the skills and knowledge to participate in the implementation of INSPIRE? 5. Does INSPIRE already have an impact on the innovative performance of Geo-ICT companies in Europe?
  3. 3. 3/18smeSpire project  Rationale of smeSpire project (May 2012 – April 2014): SMEs can enable countries to fulfill the INSPIRE Directive, creating new market opportunities with increased potential for innovation and new jobs.  Objective of the project: “to encourage and enable the participation of SMEs in the mechanisms of harmonizing and making geodata available.”  Activities: 1. STUDY : Assess the market potential for SMEs 2. TRAINING: Develop a multilingual training package 3. BEST PRACTICES: Collect and exploit a BP Catalogue 4. TRANSFER: Create a network capable of transferring result- driven knowledge throughout Europe
  4. 4. 4/18smeSpire study
  5. 5. 5/18 source: EC-JRC, 2007, Mapping the ICT in EU Regions http://ipts.jrc.ec.europa.eu/publications/pub.cfm?id=1554 ICT SMEs in Europe ICT SMEs 480,000 (Eurostat, 2009) “micro” (< 10empl.) 90% Total turnover 400bln€ Employees: 2.9 million smeSpire estimation: up to 2% of ICT SMEs dealing with GI
  6. 6. 6/18 Geo-ICT SMEs in Europe source: http://www.smespire.eu/map/smes/map.html Employees “small” (< 50 empl.) 90% “micro” (<10 empl.) 60% Turnover < 1 mil € 75% < 500.000 € 58% Group 16 % is part of an enterprise group
  7. 7. 7/18year of foundation 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 %ofcompaniesfounded-peryear a: Oracle (1978), dbf (1979) b: ArcInfo, AutoCAD (1982), MapInfo (1985) c: www (1990), Mosaic browser (1993) d: US Ex.Order 12906, OGC (1994), ArcView 1, Java (1995), shapefile , Mapquest (1996) e: OSM (2004), GoogleMaps, PostGIS (2005), OpenLayers (2006) 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 1920 1930 1940 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 Cumulative%ofcompanies Timeline a b c d e
  8. 8. 8/18activities & customers 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% Education Implementation of network services General IT consultancy Data modeling Transformation of spatial data Development of client applications Use of spatial data all activities primary activity Customers? • Public sector as the main customer for most companies (60%) • Public authorities at local/regional/national level in their own country
  9. 9. 9/18knowledge of INSPIRE Current awareness of INSPIRE “Well, ... yes, I have heard” 31% 69% No Yes
  10. 10. 10/18knowledge of INSPIRE Knowledge in the organization of INSPIRE and INSPIRE regulation • Knowledge of general objectives and principles is high • Regulations about “Data” and “Network services” are less known Objectives Main Principles Conceptual Framework Metadata regulation Data and Service regulation Network Services regulation Interoperability of spatial data sets and… Monitoring and reporting obligations regulation 5.0 1.8 2.1 1.4 1.4 2.5 3.2 6.4 18.1 18.5 21.7 20.3 19.9 18.9 16.7 22.1 45.9 44.5 36.3 35.6 35.2 31.0 35.2 23.8 Very low / low Average High / very high
  11. 11. 11/18INSPIRE involvement Current involvement in INSPIRE Only 1/3 of participant companies is directly involved in INSPIRE activities: • most of them as a contractor of public authorities • some of them as member of interest communities or expert in thematic working groups 34% 66% Yes No
  12. 12. 12/18INSPIRE involvement Current development of INSPIRE compliant components (%) • Companies mainly involved in development of view services and data modeling (both 26%) and metadata catalogue (21%) • Lowest involvement is on schema transformation (9.6%) 26.0 16.4 21.0 16.0 26.0 17.1 15.3 9.6 12.1 16.4
  13. 13. 13/18impact of INSPIRE Changes already occurred and/or foreseen due to INSPIRE Directive • impact of INSPIRE already quite high, and expected to increase in future • current impact related to introduction of new products/services • future impact related to new products/services and new customers Introduction of new or significantly improved products/services New or significantly improved methods of producing products/services Delivery of products/services to new customer groups/geographic markets Delivery of products/services in less time or lower cost 42.0 33.5 31.7 28.1 73.7 67.3 71.9 66.2 Foreseen Occurred
  14. 14. 14/18barriers to innovation Lack of funds within your enterprise or group Lack of finance from sources outside your enterprise Innovation costs too high Lack of qualified personnel Lack of information on technology Difficulty in finding cooperation partners for innovation Market dominated by established enterprises Uncertain demand for innovative products or services 23.1 19.9 35.9 25.6 20.3 31.0 24.9 31.3 27.8 30.2 23.1 19.6 10.3 21.7 28.8 35.2 13.2 13.9 5.7 2.8 2.5 5.0 18.5 9.6 Average High Very high Barriers that hinder or prevent innovation • Main barrier: dominance of market by established enterprises • Several barriers related to financial aspects • Internal and external barriers
  15. 15. 15/18 34% 66% Yes No R&D and innovation projects EU co-funded research Only 1/3 of participant companies was involved in co-funded R&D projects in 2011: • 65% of them in 7th Framework Programme (FP7) • 23% of them with co-funded annual budget lower than 10K€ • 10% of them with co-funded annual budget between 100K€ and 500K€
  16. 16. 16/18R&D and innovation projects FP7 projects (all topics) In the period 2007-2012 there were: • 18,000 projects founded • more than 40,000 participant organizations • 31bln€ funded by EU FP7 projects dealing with GI ~200 projects with direct focus on Geographic Information: • search on Cordis web site: “inspire” or “geoss” or “gmes” or “spatial” or “geo” • more than 1,000 participants • 482mln€ • 381 EU27 cities involved SMEs difficulties Very hard for SMEs to participate in EU-funded projects: • barriers in creating or entering a consortium and make proposals • advance payments are very low • Percentage of SMEs’ funded budget is very low (14% of total*) * smeSpire elaboration on ICT FP7 projects only (http://open-data.europa.eu/en/data/dataset/ict-research-projects-under-eu-fp7)
  17. 17. 17/18R&D and innovation activities FP7 projects regarding “Geoinformation”: lines represent connections between partners involved (colour and width measure the amount of EC funding received from by each city-partner from each city-coordinator)
  18. 18. 18/18thank you!  Questions, comments?  Want to participate?  smeSpire study: • JRC: Piergiorgio Cipriano, Max Craglia, Elena Roglia, Paul Smits • KU Leuven: Glenn Vancauwenberghe, Danny Vandenbroucke  smeSpire project: • Coordinator: Giacomo Martirano (Epsilon Italia) • www.smespire.eu • @smespire • smespire

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