Reinvigorating the
Experienced Instruction
Librarian
Elizabeth Bucciarelli
Sara Memmott
Eastern Michigan University
Michig...
Why do we need to reinvigorate
ourselves?
http://www.flickr.com/photos/scragz/91147636/
Why do we need to reinvigorate
ourselves?
•Combat instruction librarian burnout
•Keep up with:
• New knowledge in teaching...
ACRL Immersion Program -
Background
•Why we attended
• Family responsibilities
• Funding
• Desire for change
• Intensity o...
ACRL Immersion Program Experience
http://www.flickr.com/photos/donnagrayson/213849446/
ACRL Immersion Program Experience
•Faculty
•Other attendees
•Expectations
•Schedule
•Settings
Lessons Learned & Changes Made
•Student-centered teaching
•Less is more
•Creativity, research and writing are messy
•Great...
Student Learning Outcomes
Original learning outcomes for this session:
1) Develop a plan for refreshing teaching skills in...
Learning Outcomes Formula
What do you want the student to be able
to do?
Verb or
Action
Phrase
+ In order to = Great
Outco...
Examples of Learning Outcomes
• Distinguish between general and specialized
databases in order to select the most appropri...
Impact of Renewing Your Research
Instruction
•Students
•Other faculty
•Personal
What keeps your teaching fresh?
Discussion:
•What is one thing you have changed
about your teaching in the last few years?...
What keeps your teaching fresh?
• Less time talking and more engagement, chunking: In reaction to seeing
students’ faces, ...
Refreshing Your Teaching
• Continuing education
• Conferences
• Local workshops
• Taking classes in LS and in other subjec...
Refreshing Your Teaching – cont.
• Carve out time to reflect on your teaching
• “If I had time, I would _________ with my
...
Questions?
•Elizabeth Bucciarelli
ebucciare@emich.edu
•Sara Memmott
smemmott@emich.edu
Selected Bibliography
• Association of College and Research Libraries. (2010). Immersion Program. Retrieved from
http://ww...
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MLA 2010: Reinvigorating the Experienced Instruction Librarian

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Presented at the MLA Annual Conference, November 10, 2010. Elizabeth Bucciarelli and Sara Memmott.

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  • We’ve all probably heard instruction librarians describe themselves as burnt out, either jokingly or seriously. Several studies in the 1990s researched burnout in instruction librarians and found that it was common. (see reference in bibliography.) They found that job characteristics that tend to lead to burnout were common in the work of instruction librarians: repetitive work, feeling isolated, not learning or being intellectually stimulated through their teaching, and being separated from the results of their work – not seeing end products of students’ research.
    Rethinking our approach to teaching provides an opportunity to combat or prevent these problems.
    Keep in mind that it’s not only librarians who may face these issues - midcareer faculty from all disciplines may experience low morale, feel disengaged and isolated in their teaching (Romano et al 2004).
    Even if extreme burnout is not a problem, we do need to be concerned with the effectiveness of our teaching. Using the same approach and the same lesson plans for many years is unlikely to be highly effective. It’s important to keep up with new knowledge in the field, changes in students, and the shifting expectations of our institutions and accrediting agencies. At many institutions, a new focus on assessment of student learning outcomes may be instigating changes to teaching – this is certainly starting to have an influence at EMU.
  • The particular approach to learning outcomes as presented by Debra Gilchrist, one of the Immersion faculty. Learning outcomes are part of “assessment as learning” - outcomes need to be established first, and constructing good learning outcomes provides a solid foundation for moving on to deciding on the curriculum, selecting activities, deciding how to assess, and the criteria to be used for assessment.
    So this is her formula: - a learning outcome includes a verb or action phrase – describing a skill to be learned - and also + in order to (why)
    It is very helpful to take a look at Bloom’s taxonomy of cognitive skills (hierarchy of 6 levels of cognitive skills, see bibliography) to help identify appropriate verbs and action phrases for the learning outcomes, and understand the skill level required for a certain outcome.
  • First example from Debra Gilchrist
    Identify, select - Knowledge
    Distinguish between – Comprehension
    Revise – Synthesis
    Discover - Application
  • Take 1-2 minutes to write your own answers
    Take about 5 minutes to get in groups of 2-3 and discuss
  • Ideas from discussion
  • .
  • MLA 2010: Reinvigorating the Experienced Instruction Librarian

    1. 1. Reinvigorating the Experienced Instruction Librarian Elizabeth Bucciarelli Sara Memmott Eastern Michigan University Michigan Library Association Annual Conference November 10, 2010 Traverse City, MI
    2. 2. Why do we need to reinvigorate ourselves? http://www.flickr.com/photos/scragz/91147636/
    3. 3. Why do we need to reinvigorate ourselves? •Combat instruction librarian burnout •Keep up with: • New knowledge in teaching and learning • Changes in student populations • Shifting expectations of institutions and accrediting agencies
    4. 4. ACRL Immersion Program - Background •Why we attended • Family responsibilities • Funding • Desire for change • Intensity of program • Practical impact
    5. 5. ACRL Immersion Program Experience http://www.flickr.com/photos/donnagrayson/213849446/
    6. 6. ACRL Immersion Program Experience •Faculty •Other attendees •Expectations •Schedule •Settings
    7. 7. Lessons Learned & Changes Made •Student-centered teaching •Less is more •Creativity, research and writing are messy •Greater participative role for the students •See yourself as a teacher and peer to the classroom faculty •Student learning outcomes
    8. 8. Student Learning Outcomes Original learning outcomes for this session: 1) Develop a plan for refreshing teaching skills in order to generate enthusiasm for teaching 2) Design student learning outcomes in order to create more focused lesson plans
    9. 9. Learning Outcomes Formula What do you want the student to be able to do? Verb or Action Phrase + In order to = Great Outcome! Debra Gilchrist, ACRL Immersion 2009
    10. 10. Examples of Learning Outcomes • Distinguish between general and specialized databases in order to select the most appropriate database and maximize relevancy. • Distinguish between scholarly journals and popular magazines in order to select appropriate research sources. • Revise a search strategy using descriptors or subject terms in order to discover more relevant search results. • Identify the parts of a citation in order to locate a cited reference.
    11. 11. Impact of Renewing Your Research Instruction •Students •Other faculty •Personal
    12. 12. What keeps your teaching fresh? Discussion: •What is one thing you have changed about your teaching in the last few years? •What gave you the idea to make that change?
    13. 13. What keeps your teaching fresh? • Less time talking and more engagement, chunking: In reaction to seeing students’ faces, getting bored • Teaching in subject areas wasn’t familiar with – need to learn in order to teach • Students have a conversation before turning on the computer, let students drive the computer • Teaching databases – let students coach each other, let them learn from their mistakes • Changing tools • Teaching a credit class with only a small library component • Teaching over an entire semester • Getting to know students outside of instruction • Team teaching – gain a different perspective, it’s liberating, can give attention to individual students without throwing off the entire class, keep students on their toes, teach with graduate students
    14. 14. Refreshing Your Teaching • Continuing education • Conferences • Local workshops • Taking classes in LS and in other subject areas • Learning communities - e.g. faculty development centers, communities of practice • Talking with other teachers • Librarians and others, in person or online • Observe other instructors • Have a colleague observe your instruction
    15. 15. Refreshing Your Teaching – cont. • Carve out time to reflect on your teaching • “If I had time, I would _________ with my teaching”.. then make it happen! • Read literature (journals, blogs) in librarianship and also teaching and learning • Create student evaluations of your classes & make some changes they suggest • Present at conferences • Teach in other contexts - credit courses, other subjects, online
    16. 16. Questions? •Elizabeth Bucciarelli ebucciare@emich.edu •Sara Memmott smemmott@emich.edu
    17. 17. Selected Bibliography • Association of College and Research Libraries. (2010). Immersion Program. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/issues/infolit/professactivity/iil/immersion/programs.cfm • Huston, T., & Weaver, C. L. (2008). Peer coaching: Professional development for experienced faculty. Innovative Higher Education, 1, 5-20. doi:10.1007/s10755-007-9061-9 • Romano, J. L., Hoesing, R., O'Donovan, K., & Weinsheimer, J. (2004). Faculty at mid-career: A program to enhance teaching and learning. Innovative Higher Education, 29(1), 21-48. doi:10.1023/B:IHIE.0000035365.92454.a5 • Sheesley, D. F. (2001) Burnout and the academic teaching librarian: an examination of the problem and suggested solutions. The Journal of Academic Librarianship, 27(6), 447-451. doi:10.1016/S0099-1333(01)00264-6. • Walter, S. (2006). Instructional improvement: Building capacity for the professional development of librarians as teachers. Reference & User Services Quarterly, 45 (3), 213-218. • University of Texas at Austin. (2010). Bloom’s taxonomy. Retrieved from http://www.utexas.edu/academic/ctl/assessment/iar/students/plan/objectives/bloom.php • University of Texas at Austin. (2010). Writing learning objectives. Retrieved from http://www.utexas.edu/academic/ctl/assessment/iar/students/plan/objectives/

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