NYU-SMDigital Education NAGAP Presentation

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Many institutions recognize the importance of the emerging Latin American market as part of their student diversification strategy. Surprisingly, many of them are employing the same
recruitment strategies they have used domestically -- or in India and China -- with marginal success. What are the best practices to reach this key and fast-growing market? What are the cultural considerations that must be understood first? What are the unique programs many institutions overlook? What are the most common mistakes many make when trying to recruit from here? Is your institution prepared to reach this important market? Relying on experience
from an initial outreach in 2011 through today, the presenters offer advice on important considerations and best practices. In addition, the presenters will discuss key market trends, valuable insights and new programs happening in Latin America to help you understand and develop a successful strategy to reach this meaningful market.

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NYU-SMDigital Education NAGAP Presentation

  1. 1. Penetra'ng  the  Important     La'n  American  Market:   What  Every  Enrollment  Manager  Needs  to  Know   27th  Annual  NAGAP  Conference   San  Diego,  CA   May  1st,  2014  
  2. 2. I.  The  Importance  of  -­‐  and  Differences  in  -­‐  the  LatAm  Market   i.  Facts,  Figures  &  Trends  of  the  Student  Popula'on   ii.  Cultural  Considera'ons   II.   Pain  Points  (&  Surprises)  Employing  TradiQonal  Strategies   i.  What  We  Learned  Along  the  Way   III. Case  Study:  LatAm:  ASract,  Engage,  Re-­‐Engage  –  Enroll!   i.  Char'ng  a  Long-­‐term  Strategy  that  Works   IV. Best  PracQces  to  Ensure  Success   i.  What  Every  GEM  Professional  Needs  to  Know    TODAY’S  TOPICS  
  3. 3. I.  The  Importance  of  -­‐  and  Differences  in  -­‐  the  LatAm  Market  
  4. 4. I.  Facts,  Figures  &  Trends   Before  we  dive  into  the  LatAm  market,     let’s  take  a  peek  at  the  bigger  picture:     It’s  a  new  world  economy:   -­‐  Mul'-­‐cultural  /  Diversity   -­‐  Invisible  borders  /  Global  experience+   -­‐  Digitally  oriented  world   -­‐  I  want  it…”and  I  want  it  now”.  
  5. 5. I.  Facts,  Figures  &  Trends   A  considerable—and  growing—market:   -­‐  LatAm  popula'on  581M   -­‐  255M  Internet  connected  people   -­‐  93%  have  mobile  phones  (25%+  smartphones)   -­‐  200M  middle  –  high  class   -­‐  150M  young  popula'on   -­‐  $11,770  GDP   -­‐  270,000+  study  abroad   -­‐  80,000+  study  advanced  degrees  in  the  US    WHY  LATIN  AMERICA?
  6. 6. Internet  PenetraQon  Rate  in  the  Americas   June  30,  2012   Source:  Internet  World  Stats.                    Copyright  Miniwafs  Marke'ng  Group   I.  Facts,  Figures  &  Trends  
  7. 7. © Statista Inc. Average  duraQon  of  monthly  internet  usage  per  user  in  LaQn  American  countries     December  2012   27 25.1 24.3 23.4 22.7 19.8 18.1 16.2 15.9 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 Brazil Argentina Peru Chile Latin America Mexico Colombia Venezuela Puerto Rico Monthlyinternetuseinhours     Source: comScore, 2013 Brazil Digital Future in Focus. *In hours I.  Facts,  Figures  &  Trends  
  8. 8. © Statista Inc. Number  of  internet  users  in  LaQn  America     from  2011  to  2017  (in  millions)  232.4 265 299.5 329.1 354.3 376.4 394.4 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 2011 2012 2013* 2014* 2015* 2016* 2017* Numberofusersinmillions     Source: eMarketer, emarketer.com I.  Facts,  Figures  &  Trends  
  9. 9. Considered  against  their  interna/onal  peers,   consumers  in  South  &  Central  America  place   the  greatest  value  on  higher  educa1on:    with     the  vast  majority  of  those  in  Brazil  (94%),  Mexico   (92%),  Chile  (92%)  and  Venezuela  (91%)  believing   that  higher  educa1on  is  vital  (vs.  78%  globally).     (Nielsen,  September  2013)   I.  Facts,  Figures  &  Trends    WHY  LATIN  AMERICA?
  10. 10. When  asked  about  the  most  important  factor  in   geMng  a  job,  40%  of  Mexicans  aged  15  to  29   years  old  ranked  'educa1on'  as  important  as   'social  connec1ons'.       (Ibero-­‐American  Organiza'on  for  Youth,  July  2013)   I.  Facts,  Figures  &  Trends    WHY  LATIN  AMERICA?
  11. 11. The  number  of  student  visas  issued  to  La1n  American  ci1zens   rose  34%  between  2006-­‐07  and  2012-­‐13.  Chileans,  Brazilians,   Venezuelans,  Peruvians,  Ecuadorians,  Mexicans  and  Colombians   hold  8.1%  of  all  student  visas  granted  in  2012-­‐13,  up  from  6%   seven  years  ago,  Although  Asian  students  s/ll  comprise  the  vast   majority  of  student  visa  holders  (19.9%  from  China  alone),  the   propor1on  of  La1n  Americans  has  been  growing  every  year.     Department  of  Immigra'on  and  Border  Protec'on  Reports,  2013.   I.  Facts,  Figures  &  Trends    WHY  LATIN  AMERICA?
  12. 12. OTHER  CONSIDERATIONS   •  Growing  Hispanic  Popula/on   •  University  Diversifica/on   •  Hedge  the  Global  Markets   •  Proximity  to  the  US   •  Global  educa/onal  mobility   •  Developing  countries  with  rising  birth  rates,  an  increased  demand   for  educa/on  and  limited  domes/c  capacity   •  Untapped  growth  poten/al  of  mobility  below  ter/ary  level   I.  Facts,  Figures  &  Trends    WHY  LATIN  AMERICA?
  13. 13. So  close,     but  yet  so  different  –     culturally       I.  Facts,  Figures  &  Trends    WHY  LATIN  AMERICA?
  14. 14. “Cinco”  Significant  Standouts:     1.  Personal  Preference  /  Technology  Concern   2.  Na've  Recep'on  /  Communica'on   3.  Level  of  Afen'on  /    Warmth   4.  High  Expecta'ons  /  Quality   5.  Pride  /  Language  as  a  Barrier   I.  Cultural  ConsideraQons  
  15. 15. 1.  Technology/Messaging   Americans  are  used  to  Amazon.com,  online  ease   and  “iPhone  this  or  Google  that”,  but  the   comfort  level  with  technology  is  not  exactly  the   same  in  LatAm.     There  is  a  hesita'on  to  “engage”  online  ini'ally;   so  it  has  to  be  easy  and  intui've  or  LatAms  feel   a  “void”  /  see  a  “barrier”  and  may  be  turned  off.     Make  it  easy.   OBSERVATION:   SUMMARY:   I.  Cultural  ConsideraQons  
  16. 16. 2.  Localized  Experience   Not  surprisingly,  La'n  American  students  are   more  comfortable  and  at  ease  when  reading  or   speaking  their  na've  language.     Cater  your  experience  to  the  local  market,  from   ini'al  branding,  to  the  microsite,  to  the  person   (or  “system”)  processing  their  interest.     (But  not  Google  translate!)   OBSERVATION:   SUMMARY:   I.  Cultural  ConsideraQons  
  17. 17. 3.  Level  of  ASenQon:   Like  any  great  brand  experience,  a  warm  and   welcoming,  sincerely  genuine  and  “hiccup-­‐free”   experience  is  paramount  to  any  ongoing  rela'onship.     But  for  La'ns,  it’s  even  more  cri'cal  as  they  are  used   to  ‘being  served”  rather  than  the  pro-­‐ac've,  seek-­‐out   mentality  of  the  USA.         Focus  on  the  execu'on.   OBSERVATION:   SUMMARY:   I.  Cultural  ConsideraQons  
  18. 18. 4.  High  ExpectaQons:   LatAm  students  seeking  higher  educa'on  in  the   USA  have  extremely  high  expecta'ons  of   themselves…and  of  the  ins'tu'on.     Messaging,  communica'ons,  technology  behind   it  all  must  be  “top-­‐notch”  and  should  be  catered   to  their  individual  needs  or  the  trust  level   wanes.       Think  viral  implica'ons  /  social  nodes.   OBSERVATION:   SUMMARY:   I.  Cultural  ConsideraQons  
  19. 19. 5.  Language  /  Pride:   Unlike  Asia  where  English  is  almost  an  [automa'c]   second  language,  La'n  Americans  generally  seek  it  out.     Therefore,  language  can  become  a  barrier  at  'mes.     A  na've  (local)  presence  that  welcomes,  engages  and   con'nually  nurtures  the  La'n  professional  is   meaningful.     Consider  an  internal  resource  or  an  external  partner.   OBSERVATION:   SUMMARY:   I.  Cultural  ConsideraQons  
  20. 20. II.  Pain  Points  (and  Surprises)  Employing     Tradi'onal  Recruitment  Strategies    
  21. 21.  II.  Pain  Points  (&  Surprises)  Using  TradiQonal  Recruitment  Strategies   •  Lower  numbers  of  prospec've  students/ applicants  from  LatAm  markets       •  Difficulty  for  LatAm  students  to  navigate  the  US   graduate  school  admission  process     •  Lack  of  brand  awareness     •  Language  barriers  across  markets  (even  the  word   “tui'on”  does  not  translate  well)     The  Pain  Points  
  22. 22.  II.  Pain  Points  (&  Surprises)  Using  TradiQonal  Recruitment  Strategies   The  Surprises     •  Understanding  the  level  of  “hand  holding”  prospec've   applicants  require  to  navigate  the  process  (dedicated  call   center)       •  Fostering  partnerships,  pipeline  programs,  and  funding   opportuni'es  takes  'me     •  “Tradi'onal”  marke'ng  tac'cs  don’t  always  apply   (different  tac'cs  work  in  LatAm  markets)     •  Thirst  for  US  educa'on  is  strong,  but  the  'me  from  inquiry   to  applica'on  is  longer  
  23. 23. III.  Case  Study,  Afract,  Engage,  Re-­‐engage,  Enroll!    
  24. 24.  III.  CASE  STUDY  -­‐  LATAM:    ATTRACT,  ENGAGE,  RE-­‐ENGAGE,  ENROLL!     Video  here   CASE  STUDY  VIDEO  HERE:   hSps://www.youtube.com/embed/9jdzKAtCSYE?rel=0  
  25. 25. III.  CASE  STUDY  TARGET  MARKET   •  Mexico   •  Colombia   •  Ecuador   •  Peru   •  Argen'na   •  Venezuela   •  Chile   •  Brazil   •  Costa  Rica   •  Panama   •  Guatemala   •  Uruguay   •  Paraguay   •  Bolivia   •  Honduras  
  26. 26.   •  Build  the  Brand  /  Create  Top  of   Mind  awareness  for  NYU-­‐Poly   Graduate  Programs  in  La'n  America     •  Generate  qualified,  interested,  La'n   American  prospects  for  NYU-­‐Poly’s   Masters  and  PhD  Programs   III.  CASE  STUDY  CAMPAIGN  OBJECTIVES  
  27. 27. NYU-­‐POLY  was  not  a  well-­‐known   brand  throughout  South  America.         ?????????   PREVIOUS  LANDSCAPE   III.  CASE  STUDY  
  28. 28.   •  Working  Professional  (1-­‐4  years  auer  undergrad)   •  Seeking  advanced  degrees   •  Career-­‐focused,  ambi'ous,  upwardly  mobile   •  Heavy  YouTube  consumer   •  Is  a  frequent  FB  /  Social  Consumer   •  Frequents  social  dining  /  restaurants  /  nightlife   •  Frequents  higher  end  shopping  malls   III.  CASE  STUDY  TARGET  STUDENT  PROFILE  
  29. 29.   1.  Launch  an  integrated,  digital  marke'ng  campaign   focused  on  specific  engineering  programs  for  LatAm   prospects  through  search  engines,  related  educa'on   portals  and  social  media     2.  In  addi'on  to  building  the  brand  online,  we  wanted   to  encourage  students  to  complete  a  form  which   jump  started  the  Prospect  data  /  applica'on  process   CAMPAIGN  STRATEGY   III.  CASE  STUDY  
  30. 30. The assets found during the research process were used as a foundation to create the message and variables used in the campaign, keeping in mind the focus on Latin American market and what drives their attention. Landing  Pages  Layout   MulQ  Variable  Test     Assets  Matrix   CompeQtors  Assets   Tested  Assets   III.  CASE  STUDY  INITIAL  PRODUCTION  PLANNING  
  31. 31. Online  (95%)   •  Suppor've  medium  of  NYU-­‐Poly  Technology  &  Innova'on   •  Can  be  fully  measured   •  Can  be  op'mized  on  the  fly     Offline  (5%)   •  Addi'onal  Brand  Awareness  and  Impact   •  Supports  the  Technology  Message  with  the  Chosen  channel   •  Reinforces  the  Connected  /  Real  Social  Life  brand  exposure   III.  CASE  STUDY  BUDGET  /  CHANNEL  FOCUS  
  32. 32. III.  CASE  STUDY  MEDIA  CHANNELS   Google  generated  –  and  received  –  the  most  aIen1on!  
  33. 33. III.  CASE  STUDY  AD  PLACEMENT  STRATEGY  
  34. 34. III.  CASE  STUDY  SAMPLE  AD  FORMATS   TEXT  AND  DISPLAY   Ad  formats  in  Spanish,     English  and  Portuguese  
  35. 35. III.  CASE  STUDY  CAMPAIGN  CREATIVES  
  36. 36. III.  CASE  STUDY  CONSERVATIVE  LANDING  
  37. 37. III.  CASE  STUDY  MULTIVARIATE  TESTING   We  tested  over  140  different  landing   pages  to  determine  best  assets  
  38. 38. III.  CASE  STUDY  VIDEO  SPOKESPERSON   VIDEO  SPOKESPERSON   Each  landing  page  encompassed  a  “live”     actor  who  delivered  a  targeted  message     in  the  na've  language  
  39. 39. III.  CASE  STUDY  ENGLISH  /  MBA  LANDING  
  40. 40. III.  CASE  STUDY  ENGLISH  /  NYC  TRAVEL  
  41. 41. III.  CASE  STUDY  SPANISH  VIDEOSPOKESPERSON   SEE  VIDEO  LANDING  PAGE  HERE:     hSps://www.youtube.com/embed/6kCGbhwYdQo?rel=0  
  42. 42. III.  CASE  STUDY  PORTUGESE  VIDEOPERSON  
  43. 43. III.  CASE  STUDY  “PHABLET”-­‐FOCUSED  
  44. 44. III.  CASE  STUDY  PROSPECT  DATA  POINTS  
  45. 45. III.  CASE  STUDY  REPORTING  /  METRICS   TEST PHASE TWEAK PHASE OPTIMIZED PHASE Number     of  Prospects   Cost  per     Prospect   PHASE I PHASE II PHASE III
  46. 46. III.  CASE  STUDY  CONSTANT  COMMUNICATION  
  47. 47. III.  CASE  STUDY  OVERALL  CAMPAIGN  METRICS     •                                   Campaign  impressions   •                             Visitors   •  Prospects  from  all                    countries   •  Prospect  Ac'vity  is  up   •  Apps  are  up   •  Enrolled  Students  are  up       250%   60%   150%   18   370M   331K  
  48. 48. IV.  Best  Prac'ces  to  Ensure  Success:   What  Every  GEM  Professional  Needs  to  Know    
  49. 49.            IV.  Best  PracQces  for  Success:  What  every  GEM  Professional  Should  Know     •  Lack  of  Brand  Recogni'on  in  La'n  America     •  A  minimal  LatAm  student  body   •  Lack  of  Resources  and  an  Acute     Understanding  of  Local  Markets  to     Engage  Poten'al  Applicants,  Effec'vely   CHALLENGES  for  MOST  US  UNIVERSITIES  
  50. 50.            IV.  What  every  GEM  Professional  Should  Know   1.  Define  your  University  Goals  :Branding/Prospects/Both   2.  Iden'fy  your  target  market(s)  and  budget   3.  Be  prepared  to  think  long(er)-­‐term   4.  Ensure  you  have  a  process  for  a  fluid  LatAm  experience   5.  Foster  partnerships,  unique  pipelines  and  funding  opportuni'es   6.  Iden'fy  a  La'n  American  resource  (internal/external)   7.  Think  and  be  “local”.    Consider  microsites.     8.  Expand  communica'on  channels  (Skype,  chat,  email,  Tel  #’s)   9.  Test,  test,  and  then  test  again.       10.  Con'nue  to  op'mize  campaign   Best  PracQces  for  Success:     Your  brand.    Your  prospects.    And  a  long  term  plan  for  LatAm.  
  51. 51. OUR  PRESENTERS   Raymond  A.  Lutzky      Senior  Director,  Graduate  Enrollment  Management  and  Admissions      New  York  University      Polytechnic  School  of  Engineering      Email:  rlutzky@nyu.edu      Web:  www.nyu.edu       Montgomery  L.  Byers,  Jr.      Managing  Director,  SMDigital  Educa/on      SMDigital  Partners      Email:  fmbyers@smdigitalpartners.com      Web:  www.SMDigitalEduca/on.com  

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