Lccc moving the needle handouts 1-17-0830

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  • In Florida:Students with accelerated credit are 14% more likely to pass ENC 1101 with a C or better; In MAC 1105 they are 23% more likely to pass with C or higher
  • In Florida the median earnings is 27% greater for certificate holders than those who left without any credential. ($8,000 per year more)Overall median earnings was higher for those who gained certificates than for those who completed an AA degree and went immediately into the workforce.The longer the certificate the higher the earnings.
  • California Community College System -25% of FTIC students achieve this goal.ExampleIf your school increased the percentage from 25% to 30
  • 19% took classes in summerIf raised to 25%10% increase in your graduation rate or 2 graduates per 100 FTIC
  • California Community College System- Take Math = 29%54% attempt no math two years29% enrolled in math but only at the remedial level 17% enrolled in a college level math but dropped or failed.-Take College English = 36%Math if increased to 34% (from 29%)6% increase in graduation or 2 additional graduates per 100 FTICEnglish if increased to 41% (from 36%)5% increase in graduation or 1.5 additional graduates per 100 FTICIn Florida, students with accelerated credit are 14% more likely to earn a C or higher in ENC 1101 and 23% more likely to earn a C or higher in MAC 1105
  • Materials includedCourse ContentLearning ObjectsDiscussion Questions
  • Lccc moving the needle handouts 1-17-0830

    1. 1. Jim SimpsonFlorida State College at Jacksonville
    2. 2. Goal: 8,000,000 Additional Graduates Source: The College Board Advocacy & Policy Center., College Completion Graph, State-by-State College Completion
    3. 3. Ohio Share  290,111 additional degrees needed by 2020.  4,396 additional degrees needed each year to reach the goal  4.1% average annual percentage increase in degree production needed.Source: Kelly, Patrick; (April, 2010), “Closing the College Attainment Gap between the U.S. and Most EducatedCountries, and the Contribution to be made by the States”, National Center for Higher Education ManagementSystems
    4. 4. 10 Year Growth in GraduatesSource: Community College Week; June 16, 2012; Volume 24, No 22
    5. 5. LCCC Graduation History1,500 1,250 1,263 1,174 1,086 1,091 1,0741,000 941 750 2005-2006 2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011 GraduatesSource: Ohio Board of Regents
    6. 6. Community College Graduation Rates (150%) for Full Time Students24.0 23.6% 22.9% 22.9%23.022.0 21.9% 21.5%21.0 20.6% 20.3%20.019.018.0 1999 starting 2000 starting 2001 starting 2002 starting 2003 starting 2004 starting 2005 starting cohort cohort cohort cohort cohort cohort cohortSource: US Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Derived from: Graduation rates of first-timepostsecondary students who started as full-time students. Table 341
    7. 7. LCCC Graduates Needed2,5002,000 2,038 1,945 1,856 1,771 1,6901,500 1,612 1,538 1,468 1,401 1,174 1,2631,000 1,086 1,074 5,664 3,298 500 0 Graduates Needed Graduates
    8. 8. What Does this Mean to You?0.1850.180 You must improve your 0.1790.175 efficiency by increasing the 0.1760.170 number of graduates per FTE 0.170 0.1730.165 0.167 0.166 0.1640.160 0.161 0.158 0.1580.155 0.156 0.156 0.1540.1500.145 0.147 0.1440.140 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 Efficiency Needed Current Efficiency
    9. 9. Why Are We Falling Short? Inadequate Academic Preparation Poorly Designed and Delivered remediation Broken Credit Transfer Policies Confusing Financial Aid Programs A Culture that Rewards Enrollment Instead of Completion A System Too Often Out of Touch with the Needs of Today’s College Students. Source: Complete College America, (2010) The Completion Shortfall: Access without Success is an Empty Promise
    10. 10. Stopping ShortSource: Theuen, B. (2010), Most Community College StudentsNever Graduate, The Texas Tribune
    11. 11. Need to Rethink College Practices Connection Entry Progress Completion From interest to From enrollment to From program entry to From program enrollment entry into a program of 75% of program completion to study requirements credential of value for completed further education and labor market advancement Design (at scale) and align with every stageSource: Jenkins, D., January 2011, Redesigning Community Colleges for Completion: Lessons from Research onHigh –Performance Organizations, CCRC Working Paper No. 24; Columbia University TeacherCollege, Community College Research Center
    12. 12. Potential Graduates in a Year Students Who Have Completed Their Course Requirements for a Degree or Certificate
    13. 13. Typical College Profile Did Not Graduate POS POS Does Reflects Not Reflect Intent Intent Graduated
    14. 14. Goal 1: Capture Your Graduates Graduated POS Reflects Intent
    15. 15. Goal 2: Expand The Box Graduated POS Reflects Intent
    16. 16. 6 Key Strategies to Exponentially Increase Graduation Rates  Automate Processes  Implement Progression Tracking Tools  For Managers  For Students  Maximize Program Design  Advise for Impact  Schedule for Success  Promote Active Learning Strategies
    17. 17. System Design Does your college use automated systems in your graduation process? (Example: Automated Degree Audit Processes) Advantages of automated processes:  Sustain graduation rates without relying on manual processes which may have a single point of failure.  Translate gains a college may have in retention into graduates automatically.  Implementation of automated processes may allow a college to have substantial gains in graduation rates in a short period of time.
    18. 18. FSCJ’s Automated Processes Auto – Graduation Auto – Populate Auto – Program of Study Auto - Articulation
    19. 19. Automated-Graduation (Auto-GRAD) What is Auto-GRAD? Auto-GRAD is an automated degree audit that is run periodically on every degree seeking student at the college.
    20. 20. Typical College Profile Did Not Graduate POS POS Does Reflects Not Reflect Intent Intent Graduated
    21. 21. Auto-Grad ProfileGraduated Did Not Graduate POS POS DoesReflects Not Reflect Intent Intent Graduated
    22. 22. Automated-Graduation (Auto-GRAD)Impact of Auto-GRAD at FSCJ Students no longer are required to apply for graduation Number of total Workforce graduates increased by 42% in one year Graduate yield per Workforce FTE increased by 31% in one year.
    23. 23. Automated-Graduation (Auto-GRAD)As a Result of Auto-GRAD Led to creation of student Progression Matrix in the program managers’ dashboard and in the student portal. Led to the creation of the Auto – Population process Led to the creation of the Auto-Program of Study Process
    24. 24. Automatic-Graduation (Auto-GRAD)Limitation For Auto-GRAD to have a major impact on enhancing graduation rates the Program of Study codes in your student records must be reasonably accurate.
    25. 25. Automated-Population (Auto-POP) What is Auto-POP? Auto-POP is an automated process for populating program of study codes for college credit certificate programs that are embedded into existing Associate degrees.
    26. 26. Automated-Population (Auto-POP)Why Auto-POP is Needed For Auto-GRAD to work for college credit certificate programs a program’s program of study code must be in the student’s record. College credit certificate program of study codes are seldom added to a student’s record  Advisors very seldom added college credit certificate program of study codes to a students record when initially advising students.  Program Managers frequently forgot to add college credit certificate program of study codes to a student’s record when advising students.  Students seldom added college credit certificate program of study codes to their own record when changing their program of study.
    27. 27. Auto- Pop ProfileGraduated Did Not Graduate POS POS Does Reflects Not Reflect Intent Intent Graduated
    28. 28. Automated-Population (Auto-POP)Impact of Auto-POP at FSCJ Provided a technology solution to the issue of students not having the relevant program of study codes for embedded certificate programs in a student record Certificate graduates increased by 61% in one year Graduates per FTE for certificate programs increased by 48% in one year
    29. 29. Automated-Population (Auto-POP)Limitation For Auto-POP to have a major impact on enhancing graduating rates in certificate programs the Program of Study codes in your student records must be reasonably accurate.
    30. 30. Automated-Program of Study (Auto-POS)What is Auto-POS? Auto-POS is an automated process for populating program of study codes, in a students record, based on the student course taking behavior. The Auto-POS process is combined with Auto-POP to automatically populate certificate program of study codes.
    31. 31. Automated-Program of Study (Auto-POS) Why Auto – POS is Needed Tracking should be based on “students actual course-taking behaviors rather than declared major or intent, which can change and are unreliable indicators of student behavior.”Source: Jenkins, Davis, April 2011, Get with the Program: Accelerating Community College Students’ Entryinto Completion of Programs of Study. CCRC Working Paper No. 32. Columbia College TeachersCollege, Community College Research Center.
    32. 32. Automated-Program of Study (Auto-POS)Why Auto-POS is Needed For Auto-Grad to work well program of study codes that reflect the students course taking activity must be reasonably accurate. Program of study codes in student records are not as accurate as we would desire.  During advising rush, Advisors rely on program codes they have memorized  AA Intended Transfer is a “safe” program of study code.  Students don’t notify anyone when they change their program of study
    33. 33. Automated-Program of Study (Auto-POS)How is Auto-POS Performed? Most programs have unique courses found only in that program.  FSCJ has 173 total programs of which 122 are stand-alone programs (college has 51 embedded certificate programs)  119 stand-alone programs (97%) have unique courses that are taken either in the first semester or second semester of the program. Those unique courses serve as the “trigger” course for automatically adding program of study codes to a student record.
    34. 34. Automated-Program of Study (Auto-POS)How is Auto-POS Performed (continued)? When the student takes a “trigger” course the program of study for that program is automatically added to the student’s record.  If a degree program of study code is added that has embedded certificate programs, the certificate program of study codes are automatically added via the Auto-POP process.  The students “original” intent is highlighted.  No program of study codes are deleted from a students record.  Student can view the program of study codes (and the percentage of degree completion) in their student portal.
    35. 35. Auto – POS Profile Graduated POS Reflects Intent
    36. 36. Automated-Program of Study (Auto-POS)Impact of Auto-POS at FSCJ Number of total Workforce graduates increased by 14% in one year Total graduate yield per Workforce FTE increased by 3% in one years.
    37. 37. Automated-Program of Study (Auto-POS)Limitations of Auto-POS Auto-POP can not be used with VA students. 100% of programs will not have unique “trigger” courses occurring within the first year of program of study. Students will be duplicated in multiply programs of study for any reports you may generate. Students may be confused by seeing multiply program of study codes on their student portal
    38. 38. Automated-Articulation (Auto-ART)What is Auto-ART? Auto-ART is an automated process for awarding college credit based on existing institutions internal and external articulation agreements.
    39. 39. Automatic-Articulate (Auto-ART)Why Auto-ART is Needed Colleges have a large number of articulation agreements. FSCJ has 85 state mandated articulation agreements.  Most college’s processes for awarding articulated credit require individualized action and a student with a lot of patience.
    40. 40. Automatic-Articulate (Auto-ART)Why Auto-ART is Needed? Nationally, high school students with accelerated college credit are 18.1% more likely to enroll in college  In Florida, high school students with accelerated college credit are 19.8% more likely to enroll in college and 28% more likely to persist to the 2nd year. Nationally, each course of accelerated college credit results in a 5.9% increased likelihood of a student graduating.  In Florida, students with accelerated college credit are 2.4x’s more likely to graduate as compared to a student with no accelerated college credit Sources: 1. Adelman, C.; (2006), The Toolbox Revisited: Paths to Degree Completion from High School Through College; US Department of Education. 2. Copa, N., & Alexander, J.; (2008), High School Students Who Take Acceleration Mechanisms Perform Better in SUS Than Those Who Take None: Zoom Edition 2008-1, Florida Department of Education
    41. 41. Automatic-Articulation (Auto-ART)Limitation of Auto-ART Auto-ART will work best on articulated agreements with where the articulated course has been transcripted on an electronic transcript (high school or college).
    42. 42. Goal is to Expand the “Box” Graduated POS Reflects Intent
    43. 43. Progression Tracking ToolsFSCJ’s Progression Tracking Tools  75% Completion Report  Used by Program Managers to schedule courses for students nearing completion of their program.  Progression Matrix  Used by Program Managers and District Administrators  Student Portal  Used by Students
    44. 44. 75% Completion Report 75% Completion Report was run 3 times per year.  Listed those students who had completed 75% of their program course requirements.  Provide a listing of courses that the students needed to complete in order to graduate  Managers used the report for scheduling.
    45. 45. Progression Matrix - Example
    46. 46. Progression MappingCurrenty 25% 33% 50% 66% 75% 100% Graduated Active Completed Completed Completed Completed Completed Completed Current Status 3 Year Graduation Pace
    47. 47. Student Portal – Progression Tool
    48. 48. Goal is to Expand the “Box” Graduated POS Reflects Intent
    49. 49. Maximize Program DesignGuiding Principles  Relevant Programs. Programs leading to high- wage, high-skill jobs.  Program Length & Design. Ideally, Associate degrees should be designed to be no longer than 60 credit hours in length.  Certificates. Wherever possible, “building block” certificate programs should be embedded into Associate degrees.
    50. 50. Relevant ProgramsQuestions to Ask  Do you have a targeted program listed based on local labor market data?  Do you do periodic labor market reviews of existing programs?  Do you have an active Advisory Committee Structure?  Do you measure that activity?
    51. 51. Program LengthCore questions to ask in designingprogram length: Are you required by statute, licensure, or accreditation to offer a program over 60 credit hours? If the answer is no, ask yourself do the additional hours result in significant value added for the graduate?
    52. 52. Texas ExampleIn Texas, associate degrees are given anallowable range of credit hours (60 to 72). 10 largest community college in Texas were examined for length of identical programs.  Business  2 of 10 required 60 hours. Range from 60 to 69 hours. Average = 63.7; Median = 64  Office Systems  1 of 10 required 60 hours. Range from 60 to 72 hours. Average = 65.5; Median = 66
    53. 53. Texas Example Impact of Additional Hours  Assumptions: College A has a 66 credit hour program. 35% of the students are full time, these students have a F2F retention rate of 60%. Part time students have a 40% retention rate.  Theoretical graduation rate in three years for a 66 credit hour program is:  Full Time = 32.5%  Part Time = 4.9%  Weighted = 13.3%
    54. 54. Texas Example Impact of Additional Hours (continued)  Theoretical graduation rate in three years for a 60 credit hour program is:  Full Time = 36% (9.7% higher than 66 hour program)  Part Time = 6.4% (24% higher than 66 hour program)  Weighted = 16.8% (13.3% higher than 66 hour program) The college with the shorter program will need 21% fewer students to produce he same number of graduates as the longer program
    55. 55. Associate Median Length = 66 hours 15% 13% 72% Program Length 60 to 64 65 to 69 70 or Longer
    56. 56. Impact of Additional Hours at LCCC For every credit hour over 60, a LCCC program reduces the number of graduates it can produce by 2.6%.
    57. 57. Impact of CertificatePrograms onGraduation Rates A student is 33% morelikely to graduate withan associate degree ifthey graduate from anembedded certificateprogram. Source: Simpson, Jim (2007); Impact of Certificate Graduates on AS/AAS Graduate Rates at FCCJ; Florida Community College at Jacksonville Internal Study
    58. 58. Certificate ProgramsAdded Benefit  In Florida, the median earnings is 27% greater ($8,000 more per year) for certificate holders than those who leave without any credential.  In Florida, the overall median earnings are higher than those who complete an AA degree and went immediately into the workforce.  In Florida, certificate graduates did not attend high schools with either above average performance or graduation rates. These graduates were more likely to be in a disadvantaged groups Source: Jacobsen, L. & Mokher, C., (2008) Pathways to Boosting the Earnings of Low- Income Students by Increasing Their Educational Attainment, The Hudson Institute and CAN,
    59. 59. Certificate Median Length = 30 hours 45% 26% 5% 24% Credit Hour Length 12 to 19 20 to 28 29 to 38 39 or higher
    60. 60. Good Program Design  Limit Program Options  FSCJ Practice 1:2 Ratio on Electives  Limit “Or” Statements  Remove Hidden and Non- Enforceable Prerequisites  Remove Structural Barriers  Capitalize on Program Cluster SynergyAdapted From: D. Jenkis, S. Cho, 2012, Get with the Program: Accelerating CommunityCollege Students’ Entry into and Completion of Programs of Study, CCRC Working PaperNo. 32. Columbia College Teachers College, Community College Research Center
    61. 61. Good Example – Removing Structural BarrierCAS 101 Documents Processing (3)This course is an intermediate keyboarding classemphasizing further development of typing speedand accuracy, as well as the proper formatting andediting of business documents. Prerequisite: CAS 100Keyboarding or successful completion of the Special Examfor Course Credit.
    62. 62. Bad Examples of Program Design42 Credit Hour Digital Media Certificate  22 hours of hidden perquisites in the Certificate program made the certificate a 64 credit hour program. The AAS degree in Digital Media was 60 credit hours long. `64 Credit Hour AAS Accounting Program with 3credit hours of electives  Allowed for 69 hours of elective of which 33 credit hours were accounting courses not found in the AAS degree.62 Credit Hour AAS Marketing Program  No course prerequisites in the entire program.
    63. 63. The Ugly Death By Sequence Program  21 Credit Hour Networking Certificate  Every course in the certificate program (7 total) was a prerequisite for the previous course.  3.5 Years to complete for either full time or part time students
    64. 64. Impact of Program Design at FSCJ Total Programs250240 236230220 218210200190180 173170160150 2000-2001 2001-2002 2002-2003 2003-2004 2004-2005 2005-2006 2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010 2009-2010 2010-2011
    65. 65. Impact of Program Design at FSCJ Percent of Programs - High Wage/High Skill (Regional = mean $19.67 per hour)100.0% 92.5% 88.4% 87.8%90.0%80.0%70.0%60.0% 57.5%50.0% 40.9%40.0% 36.3% 37.7% 35.5% 29.4%30.0% 26.6% 26.9%20.0% 10.0% 0.0% 2000-2001 2001-2002 2002-2003 2003-2004 2004-2005 2005-2006 2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011
    66. 66. Impact of Program Design at FSCJImpact on FSCJ Associate Degrees  3% reduction in the median length of an Associate degree since 2000-2001  From 66.5 to 64.5 credit hours in length in 2010-2011  17% gain in projected (Theoretical) graduation rate  11.4% gain for full time students  30% gain for part time students
    67. 67. Impact of Program Design at FSCJImpact on Certificate Programs  63% increase in the number of certificate programs since 2000-2001.  From 60 to 98 certificate programs in 2010-2011  76% increase in the number of certificate programs that are 20 credit hours or less in length since 2000-2001  From 29 to 51 certificate programs that are 20 credit hours or less in length.
    68. 68. Advising QuestionsWhat intrusive strategies can youlaunch targeted at students whoearn W’s? Nationally, a student who receives a “W” on 20% or more of the credits they attempted decreases the probability of graduation within 3 years by 51%. In Florida community colleges, a student who receives a “W” on 20% or more of the credits they attempted decreases the probability of graduation within 3 years by 83%.
    69. 69. Advising QuestionsWhat student intrusive strategieswill you implement for Springsemester for those students whoreceive a letter grade of F in theFall? In Florida community colleges, a student who earns a “F” in 20% of their credit hours decreases the probability of a college ready student graduating within 3 years by 91+%.
    70. 70. Advising Questions 57.90% How are you going 60% to maximize the per 50% student course 40% yield? 19.40% 30%  A FTIC who earns 20 20% credit hours is 2.98 x’s more likely to graduate 10% than a student who 0% doesn’t earn 20 credit Earned 20+ Credits in First year in First Year Did Not Earn 20 Credits hours.Source: Colleen, Moore, Nancy Shulock, Jermey Ofenstein, October 2009, Steps toSuccess: Analyzing Milestone Achievement to Improve Community College StudentOutcomes, Institute for Higher Education Leadership & Policy.
    71. 71. Advising Questions How are you going 60% 45% to build a buzz for 50% Summer? 40%  A FTIC student who is 30% continuously enrolled in 20% 14.5% their first year has a 3.1 x’s higher graduation rate 10% than a student who did 0% not earn credits in the Earned Summer Did Not Earn summer. Credits Summer CreditsSource: Colleen, Moore, Nancy Shulock, Jermey Ofenstein, October 2009, Steps to Success: AnalyzingMilestone Achievement to Improve Community College Student Outcomes, Institute for Higher EducationLeadership & Policy.
    72. 72. Advising Questions Completed Course Did Not Complete Course What strategies will you 70% 61.10% use to encourage FTIC 60% 51.20% college-ready students 50% to take a college level 40% Math & English in the 30% first two years? 22% 21.20%  Students taking CL Math in first 20% two years have a graduation rate that is 2.78 x’s greater. 10%  Students taking CL English in first 0% two years have a graduation rate that is 2.4x greater. Complete CL Math Completed CL in 2 Years English in 2 YearsSource: Colleen, Moore, Nancy Shulock, Jermey Ofenstein, October 2009, Steps to Success: AnalyzingMilestone Achievement to Improve Community College Student Outcomes, Institute for Higher EducationLeadership & Policy.
    73. 73. Impact on FSCJ “W” Holds Process Implemented Fall 2010  College does not process student drops for one week in order to notify faculty member so that the faculty member can make contact with the student. Early Alert System Implemented Fall 2010  Allows students to identify students for follow-up services Programs increasingly require College English as a prerequisite for a Technical Course in the first 20 hours of a program.
    74. 74. Impact on FSCJ Implemented “Achievement” Coach’s in Workforce Programs.  5 full time Achievement Coach’s were hired utilizing Perkins funds.  Coach’s are assigned to specific programs that are having issues with student progression.  Overall goal of the Achievement Coach’s is to increase retention and graduation rates in targeted programs.
    75. 75. Scheduling Questions Are your students taking advantaged of “compressed” terms (Terms less than 16 weeks in length)  Study examined the impact of course length on student learning. n = 45,000+ students,  “After controlling for student demographics and other characteristics, intensive courses, do result in higher grades than traditional 16 week semester length courses and that this benefit peaks at about 4 weeks.  “Grades reflect a real increase in knowledge and are not the result of lowering the bar.”Source: Austin, A., Gustafson, L., (2006), Impact of Course Length on Student Learning.Journal of Economics and Finance Education., Volume 5, Number 1
    76. 76. The Advantage of Compressed Terms 4 Week Term 16 Week Term 95% 89% Richland College experienced an 8% increase 90% in student success (C or higher) and 29% 85% reduction in W’s as compared to students enrolled in same courses over 16 weeks. 79% 80% 77% 75% 70% 72% 65% 60% Session 1 Session 2 Session 3 Session 4 Source: de los Santos, G; Cruise, D, (1999), Get on the Fast Track to Learning; Learning Abstract, Volume 2, Number 1; League for Innovation in Community Colleges
    77. 77. Scheduling Questions Are your students taking advantaged of hybrid courses?  Study examined the impact of hybrid courses on completion (n = 50,102 students in 323,528 courses)  After controlling for student characteristics. students were equally likely to complete a hybrid course as to complete a face-to-face course and lower withdrawal rates than do fully online courses.Source: Xu, D., Jaggars, S. March 2011, Online and Hybrid Course Enrollment andPerformance in Washington State Community and Technical Colleges. CCRC WorkingPaper No. 31. Columbia College Teachers College, Community College Research Center.
    78. 78. Impact on FSCJ More use of Online and Hybrid Modalities to Increase Scheduling Choices  27.1% of total FTE is online  Workforce = 30.3% of FTE  AA = 25.9% of FTE  5.3% of total FTE is hybrid  Workforce = 9.6% of FTE  AA = 3.6% More use of Compressed Terms  Workforce = 42% of FTE
    79. 79. Active Learning Strategies Cooperative Learning Project Based Learning Internships/Coops Simulation Learning Communities Supplemental Instruction Technology Enhanced Classes “Right Start” Orientation On-going Active Teaching Strategy Training for Faculty
    80. 80. Strengthen On-Line Courses What are you doing to bolster and strengthen your online courses?  Student are more likely to fail or withdrawal from a fully online course as compared to a face-to-face course.  Students who took online coursework in early terms were significantly less likely to return to college in subsequent terms.  Students who took a high proportion of credits online were significantly less likely to attain an educational award or transfer to a four-year institution.Source: Xu, D., Jaggars, S.; March 2011, Online and Hybrid Course Enrollment and Performance inWashington State Community and Technical Colleges. CCRC Working Paper No. 31. Columbia CollegeTeachers College, Community College Research Center.
    81. 81. Sirius Course Elements Infusion of Mastery Learning  Research based Constructivist Approach  Activities grounded in everyday content  Topics with multiple perspectives  Collaboration Cooperative Learning  Social engagement  Group Projects
    82. 82. Impact Sirius on FSCJ Online  Impact on Online  2008-2009 27.0% of total online FTE used Sirius materials  2009-2010 38.8% of total online FTE used Sirius materials  2010-2011 45.6% of total online FTE used Sirius materials  2010-2011 Sirius Registrations  18% higher student success rate (A,B, or C)  4.8% lower withdraw rate
    83. 83. Impact on FSCJSource: SENSE: Survey of Entering Student Engagement: Florida State College at Jacksonville: 2011 Key Findings: ACCSSEE Initiative , University of Texas at Austin, College of Education, Community College Leadership Program, Centerfor Community College Student Engagement
    84. 84. Impact on FSCJ
    85. 85. Impact on Workforce Programs  150% Increase in total workforce graduates over 10 years.  Growth in graduates is 4.7x’s growth in FTE in workforce programs  Growth in graduates is 2.5x’s growth in unduplicated headcount served by workforce programs  83% increase in workforce graduates per FTE in 10 years  From 0.42 to 0.77
    86. 86. Impact on STEM Programs 249% Increase in STEM Graduates  From 143 to 534 total graduates  Growth in STEM graduates is 19.2x’s the national growth rate of 13% for STEM graduates over same 10 year period. Greater percentage of College graduates are from STEM programs  From 5.6% to 7.1% of total graduates produced by the College  From 0.3% to 1.08% of total STEM graduates in the nation. More graduates per program.  From 3.1 to 14.8 graduates per STEM program Source: Community College Week; June 13, 2011, Volume 23, No. 22
    87. 87. Contact Information Jim SimpsonAssociate Vice President of Degree and Career Programs Florida State College at Jacksonville 501 West State Street Jacksonville, FL 32202 E-mail: simpsonjamesd@gmail.com

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