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Leveraging Behavioral Science for Competitive Advantage

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Presentation by Heather Patrick, PhD, VP, Behavioral Science, Carrot Inc. at the Smart Health Conference 2018, held at Bally's Las Vegas on the 26-27th of April, 2018.

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Leveraging Behavioral Science for Competitive Advantage

  1. 1. Leveraging Behavioral Science for Competitive Advantage Heather Patrick, PhD VP, Behavioral Science Carrot Inc @HPatrick_PhD
  2. 2. The Popularization of Behavioral Science
  3. 3. You may have read...
  4. 4. You may be listening to...
  5. 5. And then these little happenings...
  6. 6. And then these little happenings...
  7. 7. Real-World Examples
  8. 8. The Popularization of Behavioral Science…
  9. 9. Changing Our Approach
  10. 10. Changing Our Approach to Behavior Change ● For some behaviors, a nudge is enough (or a habit does the trick) ○ Vaccines ○ Health screenings ○ Seatbelts
  11. 11. Changing Our Approach to Behavior Change ● For some behaviors, a nudge is enough (or a habit does the trick) ○ Vaccines ○ Screenings ○ Seatbelts ● But for most of what we’re trying to change... ○ Nutrition and dietary behaviors ○ Physical activity ○ Sleep ○ Stress management ○ Preventing or managing chronic conditions
  12. 12. Changing Our Approach to Behavior Change ● For some behaviors, a nudge is enough (or a habit does the trick) ○ Vaccines ○ Screenings ○ Seatbelts ● But for most of what we’re trying to change... ○ Nutrition and dietary behaviors ○ Physical activity ○ Sleep ○ Stress management ○ Preventing or managing chronic conditions NUDGE ISN’T ENOUGH
  13. 13. From Nudge to Sustained Motivation
  14. 14. Re-thinking motivation... LOWER MOTIVATIONAL QUALITY (e.g., less engagement, persistence) HIGHER MOTIVATIONAL QUALITY (e.g., greater engagement, persistence)
  15. 15. Re-thinking motivation... LOWER MOTIVATIONAL QUALITY (e.g., less engagement, persistence) AMOTIVATION EXTRINSIC MOTIVATION INTRINSIC MOTIVATION HIGHER MOTIVATIONAL QUALITY (e.g., greater engagement, persistence)
  16. 16. Re-thinking motivation... LOWER MOTIVATIONAL QUALITY (e.g., less engagement, persistence) AMOTIVATION EXTRINSIC MOTIVATION INTRINSIC MOTIVATION - Lack of perceived competence OR - Lack of value HIGHER MOTIVATIONAL QUALITY (e.g., greater engagement, persistence)
  17. 17. Re-thinking motivation... LOWER MOTIVATIONAL QUALITY (e.g., less engagement, persistence) AMOTIVATION EXTRINSIC MOTIVATION INTRINSIC MOTIVATION - Lack of perceived competence OR - Lack of value - Interest - Enjoyment - Inherent satisfaction HIGHER MOTIVATIONAL QUALITY (e.g., greater engagement, persistence)
  18. 18. Re-thinking motivation... LOWER MOTIVATIONAL QUALITY (e.g., less engagement, persistence) AMOTIVATION EXTRINSIC MOTIVATION INTRINSIC MOTIVATION EXTERNAL REGULATION - Lack of perceived competence OR - Lack of value - External rewards or punishments - Compliance - Reactance HIGHER MOTIVATIONAL QUALITY (e.g., greater engagement, persistence) - Interest - Enjoyment - Inherent satisfaction
  19. 19. Re-thinking motivation... LOWER MOTIVATIONAL QUALITY (e.g., less engagement, persistence) AMOTIVATION EXTRINSIC MOTIVATION INTRINSIC MOTIVATION EXTERNAL REGULATION INTROJECTION - Lack of perceived competence OR - Lack of value - External rewards or punishments - Compliance - Reactance - Ego involvement - Focus on approval from self and others HIGHER MOTIVATIONAL QUALITY (e.g., greater engagement, persistence) - Interest - Enjoyment - Inherent satisfaction
  20. 20. Re-thinking motivation... LOWER MOTIVATIONAL QUALITY (e.g., less engagement, persistence) AMOTIVATION EXTRINSIC MOTIVATION INTRINSIC MOTIVATION EXTERNAL REGULATION INTROJECTION IDENTIFICATIO N - Lack of perceived competence OR - Lack of value - External rewards or punishments - Compliance - Reactance - Ego involvement - Focus on approval from self and others - Personal importance - Conscious valuing of activity - Self- endorsement of goals HIGHER MOTIVATIONAL QUALITY (e.g., greater engagement, persistence) - Interest - Enjoyment - Inherent satisfaction
  21. 21. Re-thinking motivation... LOWER MOTIVATIONAL QUALITY (e.g., less engagement, persistence) AMOTIVATION EXTRINSIC MOTIVATION INTRINSIC MOTIVATION EXTERNAL REGULATION INTROJECTION IDENTIFICATIO N INTEGRATION - Lack of perceived competence OR - Lack of value - External rewards or punishments - Compliance - Reactance - Ego involvement - Focus on approval from self and others - Personal importance - Conscious valuing of activity - Self- endorsement of goals - Congruence - Synthesis and consistency of identifications HIGHER MOTIVATIONAL QUALITY (e.g., greater engagement, persistence) - Interest - Enjoyment - Inherent satisfaction
  22. 22. Re-thinking motivation... LOWER MOTIVATIONAL QUALITY (e.g., less engagement, persistence) AMOTIVATION EXTRINSIC MOTIVATION INTRINSIC MOTIVATION EXTERNAL REGULATION INTROJECTION IDENTIFICATIO N INTEGRATION - Lack of perceived competence OR - Lack of value - External rewards or punishments - Compliance - Reactance - Ego involvement - Focus on approval from self and others - Personal importance - Conscious valuing of activity - Self- endorsement of goals - Congruence - Synthesis and consistency of identifications - Interest - Enjoyment - Inherent satisfaction HIGHER MOTIVATIONAL QUALITY (e.g., greater engagement, persistence)
  23. 23. Supporting Basic Psychological Needs
  24. 24. Supporting Basic Psychological Needs AUTONOMY: The need to feel choiceful, and volitional; as the originator of one’s actions AUTONOMY
  25. 25. Supporting Basic Psychological Needs AUTONOMY AUTONOMY: The need to feel choiceful, and volitional; as the originator of one’s actions RELATEDNESS RELATEDNESS: The need to feel understood and valued by important others
  26. 26. Supporting Basic Psychological Needs AUTONOMY AUTONOMY: The need to feel choiceful, and volitional; as the originator of one’s actions RELATEDNESS RELATEDNESS: The need to feel understood and valued by important others COMPETENCE COMPETENCE: The need to feel capable, effective, “optimally challenged”
  27. 27. How do you do this?!
  28. 28. Helping people connect the dots
  29. 29. Creating an environment in which people feel accepted
  30. 30. Behavioral Science & Competitive Advantage
  31. 31. Market Differentiation ● Moving from engagement to retention ○ And identifying ways to measure meaningful engagement
  32. 32. Market Differentiation ● Moving from engagement to retention ○ And identifying ways to measure meaningful engagement ● Not building for lifetime members
  33. 33. Market Differentiation ● Moving from engagement to retention ○ And identifying ways to measure meaningful engagement ● Not building for lifetime members ● Redefining metrics ○ Obvious outcomes ○ Progress ○ Indicators in the pathway to change (mediators/moderators) ○ Return rates
  34. 34. The Catch
  35. 35. Questions? Heather Patrick, PhD email: heather@carrot.co Twitter: @HPatrick_PhD Web: https://pivot.co

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